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March 6, 2013
I'd like to commend you on the fine article in the Columbia Flier entitled "Our society needs to find a solution other than abortion," by Maria Santo. I think both sides of the pro-choice/life issue see room for improvement in dealing with unwanted pregnancies. This article frankly and effectively laid out the case against abortion, although I wish it had also spoken more about alternatives, such as adoption. But it's articles like this that advance the dialogue and help us progress to a more thoughtful and caring society. Thanks to the Columbia Flier for its courage and open-mindedness in airing this issue!
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
Even in a group of overachievers, Monica Lopez-Gonzalez would likely stand out. The 30-year-old native Baltimorean has two bachelor's degrees - in French and psychology - and an M.A. and Ph.D. in cognitive science, all from the Johns Hopkins University, where she recently did a stint as a postdoctoral fellow researching "the cognitive neuroscience of artistic creativity. " "The joke among my friends is that I'm such a nerd that I will get another Ph.D. so I can put 'Ph.D.²' after my name," said Lopez-Gonzalez, who currently does consulting work in the field of data visualization.
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NEWS
May 13, 1991
Washington's Mt. Pleasant riots last week were a fresh reminder of how deeply this country depends on the ability of people of different ethnic groups, beliefs and cultural backgrounds to get along with one another. Baltimore has its share of racial and ethnic tensions, but it also has some reasons for pride. High on that list is the Institute for Christian-Jewish Studies, which in its four years has broken new ground in fostering innovative and substantive community dialogue between religious groups.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
When you paint on a wall in the middle of the city, people want to talk to you. They want to tell you how they would have painted things differently, choosing a different shade of green or a different subject entirely. They want to know why you're there. They want to tell you their stories. "You did that, man?" they ask. "That is all right. " For six days last month, the artist known as Gaia painted on the side of a Korean rice cake factory in the 2000 block of N. Charles St. in Station North.
NEWS
By Beverly Bickel | September 27, 2006
This summer, I traveled with some Latin American educators to the Gal?pagos archipelago, las islas encantadas. In every caf? and souvenir shop in those "enchanted islands," we encountered reminders of Darwin's work on evolution and how we are, as he wrote, "netted together" with "our fellow brethren," the animals. I was in Guayaquil, Ecuador, to attend a conference focused on the teaching of English and cultural exchanges between Latin American countries and the United States in the hope of improving understanding and dialogue - a word, I was reminded, that comes from the Greek dialogos, meaning "to speak between and across."
SPORTS
September 17, 2010
The University of Virginia honored the memory of Cockeysville native Yeardley Love with a symbolic display on the schools grounds in anticipation of Friday's "Day of Dialogue. " The columns of the school's Rotunda were draped with black material this week as part of an art project meant to remember the U.Va. lacrosse player. According to a release, 10 south-facing columns were draped in "black diaphanous fabric. " The University also announced Friday that they were planning a series of events the following Friday that are designed to encourage dialogue among U.Va.
NEWS
June 26, 2013
The Edward Snowden who once said he was prepared to "take his lumps" for releasing secret U.S. documents is now rethinking his position ("Snowden stays put in Moscow," June 25). This self-styled crusader for freedom and transparency is desperately trying to get to Ecuador, a dictatorship with little if any freedom of the press. And Mr. Snowden's travel plans seem anything but transparent. Perhaps he has realized that his fleeting bit of fame isn't exactly what he had hoped. Perhaps the "national dialogue" on security and surveillance that he said he wanted to start - with himself as the Great Moderator - isn't working out as he thought.
FEATURES
By Jocelyn McClurg and Jocelyn McClurg,Hartford Courant | January 11, 1994
Like David Mamet, George V. Higgins has an unerring ear fo the way men talk to men.When the men in question are cops, and crooks, the talk can get very salty, very expansive and very funny indeed.A good 98 percent of "Bomber's Law" is dialogue -- or, more accurately, exchanges of long bob-and-weave monologues. Soliloquies, really. Mr. Higgins' characters are Hamlets of the street, pontificating in Boston vernacular. Each speech is like a dTC jazz riff that seems improvised, but Mr. Higgins knows exactly where he's going.
NEWS
June 25, 2004
BLACK MEN IN America have a one-in-three chance of landing in prison in their lifetime. That chilling pronouncement and the fact that one in three black men in their 20s is either imprisoned, jailed, on probation or on parole cries out for a national dialogue on prison reform. Those who think otherwise should consider these statistics: American prisons hold 2.1 million people, about a quarter of the world's prison population. It costs more than $40 billion a year to house prisoners in the United States.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | August 6, 1997
The Great American Dialogue on Race may have already begun, no thanks to President Bill Clinton, who so far has given us nothing but platitudes on the subject after declaring it an imperative for this year.But dialogues must begin with tough or uncomfortable questions. One caller posed one Sunday."What if," he asked, "there had been no slavery? Black people are much better off with slavery than they would have been without slavery."This man, judging from the tone of his voice and his question, was no snide, babbling racist.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Scharper and The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
When you paint on a wall in the middle of the city, people want to talk to you. They want to tell you how they would have painted things differently, choosing a different shade of green, or a different subject entirely. They want to know why you're there. They want to tell you their stories. "You did that, man?" they ask. "That is allllright. " For six days last week, the artist known as Gaia painted on the side of a Korean rice cake factory in the 2000 block of N. Charles St. in Station North.
NEWS
By Jon Meoli, jmeoli@tribune.com | March 7, 2014
The Baltimore County Planning Board on Thursday gave its stamp of approval to the school board's $56.2 million capital budget request for fiscal year 2015, though it attached a caveat to a controversial school construction plan approved in the budget. In a memo to Baltimore County's Director of Budget and Finance Keith Dorsey, the Planning Board urged further discussions with stakeholders about the three-part central area elementary school overcrowding relief plan that, includes the closure of Halstead Academy in Hillendale.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2014
SARASOTA, Fla. - After adding two big-ticket free-agent acquisitions over the past week, the Orioles now appear to be focused on locking up shortstop J.J. Hardy to a contract extension. The Orioles had a face-to-face meeting with Hardy's representation late last week with the intention of initiating extension talks. The 31-year-old Hardy, who has been one of the top power-hitting shortstops in the game and is the glue of the Orioles infield, has long said he'd like to remain in Baltimore for the long term.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2013
It has been nearly 30 years since Francis Poulenc's haunting opera “Dialogues of the Carmelites” was staged in Baltimore. No telling when or if it might return, so the opportunity offered this weekend by Peabody Opera Theatre should not be passed up. This uneven, but ultimately moving, production marks the third annual collaboration between Peabody Conservatory and the Modell/Lyric Performing Arts Center. The public does not seem to appreciate the value of the venture; attendance each year has been modest, as was the case again Friday night for the first of two performances of “Dialogues.” This valuable partnership deserves to be sustained, not to mention enhanced - increased funding would enable larger, more Lyric-scaled sets, for one thing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2013
For many years, critics didn't take French composer Francis Poulenc or his music very seriously, even after his first opera was premiered in 1947. Then again, that entry into the operatic realm wasn't likely to win over skeptics. The title is "The Breasts of Tiresias," and the surreal plot includes a man who fathers 40,000 children in one day. But Poulenc was the real deal, a composer with a distinctive flair for lyrical melody and an ear for exquisite harmony to support it. Those gifts were widely recognized and acclaimed when he created his second work for the stage, "Dialogues of the Carmelites," first heard in 1957.
NEWS
November 7, 2013
On Nov. 5, my wife and I attended a rare public dialogue between Jews and Muslims at Columbia's Beth Shalom Congregation between Imam Yahya Hendi, Muslim chaplain at Georgetown University, and Rabbi Andrew Busch of Baltimore Hebrew Congregation. It is the first in a series of four Tuesday night discussions during November designed to explore the various aspects of the Arab-Israeli conflict. No reporters attended despite invitations, organizers said. In response to a question about how his message of personal good will and reconciliation might be spread more effectively, Imam Hendi recalled once being invited to appear on a network television show, but after a 35-minute "screening" interview, the show was canceled.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 15, 1993
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- In his first personal appeal to President Clinton, President Saddam Hussein has urged him to open a new chapter in U.S. relations with Iraq."
NEWS
By TRUDY RUBIN | May 8, 2007
PHILADELPHIA -- He was supposed to sit across from her at the dinner table. Everyone was waiting to see if they would start a conversation. But Iranian Foreign Minister Manouchehr Mottaki left the diplomatic dinner in Sharm el-Sheik, Egypt, before Condoleezza Rice got there. "I'm not given to chasing anyone," said the U.S. secretary of state when asked if she felt stood up. Thus ended the latest chapter of the saga of whether Iran and the United States will talk. This isn't the end of the story.
NEWS
June 26, 2013
The Edward Snowden who once said he was prepared to "take his lumps" for releasing secret U.S. documents is now rethinking his position ("Snowden stays put in Moscow," June 25). This self-styled crusader for freedom and transparency is desperately trying to get to Ecuador, a dictatorship with little if any freedom of the press. And Mr. Snowden's travel plans seem anything but transparent. Perhaps he has realized that his fleeting bit of fame isn't exactly what he had hoped. Perhaps the "national dialogue" on security and surveillance that he said he wanted to start - with himself as the Great Moderator - isn't working out as he thought.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2013
Former Ravens linebacker and outspoken same-sex marriage advocate Brendon Ayanbadejo is turning his attention from playing time to publishing. Weeks after being released by the Super Bowl champions, Ayanbadejo announced today that he will serve as the guest editor of a sports-themed issue of LGBT newspaper The Washington Blade. "I'm extremely honored to be able to work with the Blade," Ayanbadejo said at a press conference. "I think through sports is the easiest way to reach a lot of people in a demographic that typically wouldn't hear about equality and why it is so near and dear to us. " Since his playing days ended -- for now, at least -- Ayanbadejo has continued advocating for the LGBT community, has made several media appearances and took part in the NFL's inaugural sports journalism boot camp.
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