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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2012
At Johnson , C.S.W. examines that odd form of English peculiar to newspapers, journalese . "Newspapers rarely, if ever, report the facts in the way you would in conversation," he comments, and anyone who knows Paula LaRocque's classic "In a surprise move ... " understands just how far apart ordinary English conversation and the stilted, formulaic lingo of newspapers have drifted. C.S.W. writes about the British form of journalese, which you can see from The Economist 's style guide differs in many particulars from the American.
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FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
Bawlamer, here's your chance to shine. Kinda. The fine elocutionists at gawker.com, ever on the prowl for clarion calls provocative enough to get a response from their site visitors, have announced a new contest that sounds right up Charm City's alley. They're looking for the country's ugliest accent. Prompted, they say, by a fear that American accents are flattening -- that is, that we're losing our regional dialects and beginning to sound blandly alike -- Gawker has thrown down the gauntlet.
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NEWS
By Wade Rawlins and Wade Rawlins,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 13, 1997
OCRACOKE, N.C. -- Ocracoke Island has long been separated from the rest of North Carolina by two things: the waters of Pamlico Sound and the islanders' brogue, echoing the speech of the early English settlers.Older islanders have their distinct pronunciations, turns of phrase and rich vocabulary. Their vowels clang together with a bell-like quality; their sentences contain relics of early English such as an extra "a" -- as in "The stars were a-shining."Their daily speech retains a few words long since vanished from mainstream English, such as "mommuck" ("to bother")
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2013
In 1936, Clare Booth Luce surprised theatergoers with “The Women,” a snappy - and snapping - play about catty New York socialities and wannabes, performed by an all-female cast. Three decades later, Canadian playwright Michel Tremblay delivered a kind of flip side. Tremblay's “Les Belles Soeurs” (“The Sisters-in-Law”), which has been given an intriguing production at Fells Point Corner Theatre, consists solely of female characters. These Montreal ladies are on a much lower socio-economic level than Luce's rhymes-with-”itchy” types, but just as prone to gossip, prejudgments and back-stabbing - and likewise capable of being awfully amusing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lorena Blas | May 19, 2005
Address: / / rinkworks.com / dialect / What's the point?: The Dialectizer takes text or other Web pages and instantly creates parodies of them. Try it out by selecting a dialect, then entering a URL or English text in the field provided. Among the "dialect" selections are Elmer Fudd, Pig Latin, Swedish chef and Cockney. What to look for?: Try out all the dialects on some serious Web sites. Also, try out the "dialectize text" feature and type in a phrase from a news story. Elmer Fudd is a favorite.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 1999
Bret Harte(1836-1902)Harte began his career writing sketches but gained wide public notice with his short stories. He helped launch the Californian and he edited the Overland Monthly.A collection of his writings titled "The Luck of Roaring Camp and Other Stories" was published in 1870.Harte's characters used a dialect that Mark Twain described as "no one on heaven or earth had ever used till Harte invented it."Harte helped make San Francisco the literary capital of the West.-- Benet's Reader's Encyclopedia of LiteraturePub Date: 06/06/99
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2013
In 1936, Clare Booth Luce surprised theatergoers with “The Women,” a snappy - and snapping - play about catty New York socialities and wannabes, performed by an all-female cast. Three decades later, Canadian playwright Michel Tremblay delivered a kind of flip side. Tremblay's “Les Belles Soeurs” (“The Sisters-in-Law”), which has been given an intriguing production at Fells Point Corner Theatre, consists solely of female characters. These Montreal ladies are on a much lower socio-economic level than Luce's rhymes-with-”itchy” types, but just as prone to gossip, prejudgments and back-stabbing - and likewise capable of being awfully amusing.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Staff Writer | October 6, 1992
Speech therapist Mary Wagner has one piece of advice for the hundreds of foreign-born residents getting established in area neighborhoods and companies."
FEATURES
June 30, 2006
THE QUESTION What is your favorite Meryl Streep film and why? The Academy Award-winning actress stars in Robert Altman's A Prairie Home Companion, which opened in theaters this month. And today, her next movie - The Devil Wears Prada - opens nationwide. WHAT YOU SAY I find it impossible to pinpoint a single film in which she starred since she adapts herself and excels in every role that she portrays. FREDA GARELICK, BALTIMORE Because I enjoy impersonations and accents, my favorite Meryl Streep role is Francesca in The Bridges of Madison County.
NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 27, 2001
When we grow up and leave home we take a load of emotional baggage with us. Da, a charming, funny comedy-drama by the Irish dramatist Hugh Leonard, shows us the attempts of a man to deal with this baggage - especially the part of it created by his infuriating stepfather. As the play opens, Da has just died at a great age, and Charlie, now a successful playwright in London, has flown back to Dublin to do the necessary things. Memories flood in on him as he looks around the house in which he grew up. He begins to relive scenes from his childhood and young manhood, sometimes taking part in them, sometimes looking on from the outside.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2012
At Johnson , C.S.W. examines that odd form of English peculiar to newspapers, journalese . "Newspapers rarely, if ever, report the facts in the way you would in conversation," he comments, and anyone who knows Paula LaRocque's classic "In a surprise move ... " understands just how far apart ordinary English conversation and the stilted, formulaic lingo of newspapers have drifted. C.S.W. writes about the British form of journalese, which you can see from The Economist 's style guide differs in many particulars from the American.
FEATURES
June 30, 2006
THE QUESTION What is your favorite Meryl Streep film and why? The Academy Award-winning actress stars in Robert Altman's A Prairie Home Companion, which opened in theaters this month. And today, her next movie - The Devil Wears Prada - opens nationwide. WHAT YOU SAY I find it impossible to pinpoint a single film in which she starred since she adapts herself and excels in every role that she portrays. FREDA GARELICK, BALTIMORE Because I enjoy impersonations and accents, my favorite Meryl Streep role is Francesca in The Bridges of Madison County.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lorena Blas | May 19, 2005
Address: / / rinkworks.com / dialect / What's the point?: The Dialectizer takes text or other Web pages and instantly creates parodies of them. Try it out by selecting a dialect, then entering a URL or English text in the field provided. Among the "dialect" selections are Elmer Fudd, Pig Latin, Swedish chef and Cockney. What to look for?: Try out all the dialects on some serious Web sites. Also, try out the "dialectize text" feature and type in a phrase from a news story. Elmer Fudd is a favorite.
FEATURES
By Justin Davidson and Justin Davidson,NEWSDAY | January 5, 2005
It'd be nice to report that PBS' new linguistic safari, Do You Speak American?, is tubular, pro-nasty or even just mad real, but omg, it's, like, so not. If that sentence mystifies you, it could be because: a) it's an inauthentic scramble of surfer- speak, hip-hop street talk, instant-message shorthand and Valley Girlish; b) neither you nor anyone you know is 25 or younger; or c) you hold your nose well clear of the bubbling language stew of popular culture. Whatever the root of this ignorance, the implacably pleasant Robert MacNeil, former co-anchor of public television's MacNeil/Lehrer Newshour, will take you by the hand and guide you through the infernal byways of American speech, that up-side-underworld where "sick," "ill" and "nasty" are terms of approval.
NEWS
By Michael Duck and Michael Duck,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 14, 2003
Many church communities socialize over coffee and doughnuts Sunday mornings. But the Chinese Bible Church of Howard County may be the only local congregation sharing rice and stir-fried vegetables after each week's services. "Food is very important in Chinese churches," church elder Desmond Chan said. "When [Chinese people] sit down to eat, they share in the food, they talk, they share about their lives." The weekly meal celebrates the cultural and spiritual community of this Columbia-based independent Bible church, an offshoot of Rockville's Chinese Bible Church of Maryland.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | January 22, 2003
EHOHOO. Almost-Baltimoreans know this sound. Real Baltimoreans say it. No, it's not the whoop of the first swimmer downyocean on Memorial Day, nor the bellow of Willie Don Schaefer contemplating Parris Glendening's gift of African violets, nor the frustrated cry of the pixilated Ravens fan. EHOHOO is the classic Baltimore "O." As in "NO," when you clinch your brows, crinkle your nose, pucker your lips and emit the sound "NEHOHOO." As ancient Highlandtowners once vowed, "Nehohoo way I'm moving out Blair Road."
NEWS
January 20, 1997
Black dialect fine in some situationsAfter working for the Baltimore County school system for 32 years as a speech-language pathologist, I admit to having encountered the situation of black dialect use with hundreds of wonderful African-American youngsters on countless occasions.I never had a problem with it. Black dialect was described as one way of talking. It is an honorable and legitimate form of oral communication. Like many other dialects, its use is limited.My students were never urged to discard it as an alternative form of talking.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
Bawlamer, here's your chance to shine. Kinda. The fine elocutionists at gawker.com, ever on the prowl for clarion calls provocative enough to get a response from their site visitors, have announced a new contest that sounds right up Charm City's alley. They're looking for the country's ugliest accent. Prompted, they say, by a fear that American accents are flattening -- that is, that we're losing our regional dialects and beginning to sound blandly alike -- Gawker has thrown down the gauntlet.
NEWS
By Faye Fiore and Faye Fiore,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 23, 2001
WASHINGTON - Two months ago, Christopher Ross was languishing in diplomatic exile, his 30-year career as a foreign service officer topped out with two ambassadorships. After the catastrophe he saw that awful Tuesday on television in his Capitol Hill townhouse, he wondered, like most Americans, what he could do. But unlike most Americans, Ross had a skill that could help the U.S. government but was dismissed when he was nudged into retirement two years ago at 55: He is reputed to be the most fluent non-native Arab speaker in the diplomatic corps, conversant in many dialects of a complex tongue, a man said to speak Arabic better than some Arabs do. It wasn't long before former colleagues at the State Department were floating his name.
NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 27, 2001
When we grow up and leave home we take a load of emotional baggage with us. Da, a charming, funny comedy-drama by the Irish dramatist Hugh Leonard, shows us the attempts of a man to deal with this baggage - especially the part of it created by his infuriating stepfather. As the play opens, Da has just died at a great age, and Charlie, now a successful playwright in London, has flown back to Dublin to do the necessary things. Memories flood in on him as he looks around the house in which he grew up. He begins to relive scenes from his childhood and young manhood, sometimes taking part in them, sometimes looking on from the outside.
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