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BUSINESS
By PETER H. LEWIS | June 10, 1991
Displaymate is a remarkable new utility program for IBM PCs and compatibles that can help a computer user select the best monitor for the money, adjust it for optimum performance and identify any problems that can lead to eye strain, loss of productivity or costly repairs.People who use a personal computer at work typically spend between 200 and 2,000 hours a year staring at the screen.It is curious that many of these intensive computer users rarely give a conscious thought to the computer display that is staring them in the face all day, even though they may agonize over choosing just the right microprocessor, the optimum memory configuration, the fastest disk drives and other facets of the system they will never see.Displaymate ($79 from Sonera Technologies Inc. of Rumson, N.J., (800)
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2010
A shortage of imported radioactive material widely used to diagnose heart problems and other maladies has had doctors locally and across the country scrambling for alternatives, including some with higher costs and lower quality. The nation's supply of technetium has been low for the past 15 months since its main supplier, a Canadian nuclear reactor, went offline. And while production is now ramping back up, the incident has put a spotlight on the country's dependence on foreign sources of the workhorse isotope.
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BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | February 1, 2002
Igen International Inc. said yesterday that its fiscal third-quarter loss narrowed as revenue grew and litigation costs were offset by a payment from its rival in a breach-of-contract suit, Roche Diagnostics. Based in Gaithersburg, the maker of diagnostic tests said it lost $9.2 million, or 48 cents per share, on revenue of $10.4 million. That compares with a loss of $16 millon, or $1.04 per share, on revenue of $8.5 million in the quarter that ended Dec. 31, 2000. The company said the 23 percent increase in quarterly revenue was due to increases in royalty income, product sales and contract revenue.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,sun reporter | June 5, 2007
Dutch company Qiagen NV likely agreed to buy Gaithersburg's Digene Corp. over the weekend in a $1.6 billion deal for one main reason: to get its hands on the local company's HPV Test, which detects a cancer-causing virus. The acquisition puts Qiagen at the forefront of what analysts are calling one of the hottest areas in biotechnology. Known as molecular diagnostics, it is a relatively new discipline that uses genetic and protein information to better diagnose infectious diseases and cancer or predispositions toward them.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | December 13, 2001
Igen International Inc. said yesterday that it had raised $30 million by selling more than 1 million shares of common stock to a New York investment fund, providing cash needed for everything from acquisitions to legal bills. Gaithersburg-based Igen, a maker of biological diagnostic tests, said it sold 1,018,808 shares of its stock to Acqua Wellington Private Placement Fund Ltd. and Acqua Wellington Opportunity I Ltd. in a private placement. "This financing enhances our ability to continue advancing our business plan and maximizing shareholder value from all the opportunities before us," Samuel J. Wohlstadter, Igen's chief executive officer, said in a statement.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | November 22, 2001
Igen International Inc. shares continued to rise yesterday, closing at a six-month high of $36.73 on speculation that the Gaithersburg company will win a favorable court settlement in its contract dispute with Roche Diagnostics. Shares rose $1.30 yesterday, nearly 4 percent, on the Nasdaq stock market. The gain caps a surge of more than 26 percent since Oct. 25, when the trial of Igen's suit against Roche began in U.S. District Court in Greenbelt. In five months, shares have gained 75 percent from a low of $20.97 on June 18. "From what we can tell, the trial is going very well in Igen's favor," said John M. Putnam of Gruntal & Co. "We don't think Roche will have much to present in its defense."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | July 10, 2003
RICHMOND, Va. - Roche Holding AG may lose its license to use Igen International Inc. technology after an appeals court upheld yesterday Igen's right to end the contract even as the judges reduced by more than $486 million the damages Roche was told to pay. Roche, the world's biggest maker of diagnostic tests, will have to renegotiate the contract or lose access to technology used to evaluate body fluids for illnesses such as cancer and thyroid disorders....
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | November 20, 2000
Harold P. Roth, a physician and former director at the National Institutes of Health, died Tuesday of complications from a stroke at his home in Pikesville. He was 85. Dr. Roth was senior gastroenterologist emeritus at NIH in Bethesda, which he joined in 1974 as associate director of the Division of Digestive Disease and Nutrition. He became the division's director in 1983. Two years later, his interest in epidemiology and the use of computers for medical records led to his appointment as director of epidemiology and data systems at the same division.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | May 12, 1999
Digene Corp. a Beltsville-based developer of DNA-based medical tests for diseases, said yesterday that drug giant Abbott Laboratories will act as the marketer and distributor for its tests in Europe, the Middle East and Africa.Among the tests Abbott will market are Digene's diagnostic products for hepatitis B and the human papillomavirus (HPV), considered a precursor to cervical cancer.In the United States, Abbott, one of the world's largest marketers of medical diagnostics, will launch sales of Digene's new automated tests for chlamydia, a urinary tract infection, and gonorrhea, a sexually transmitted disease.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | June 4, 2007
Facing increased competition for its main product - the HPV Test - and questions about its plans for growth, Gaithersburg's Digene Corp. agreed yesterday to be acquired by a foreign company in a $1.6 billion cash and stock deal designed to boost the local biotech firm's international sales effort and speed technology development. Under the agreement, Netherlands-based Qiagen N.V. would pay $61.25 for Digene shares - up to $880 million - on a first-come, first-served basis. That represents a 37 percent premium over Digene's $44.77 closing price Friday on the Nasdaq.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | June 4, 2007
Facing increased competition for its main product - the HPV Test - and questions about its plans for growth, Gaithersburg's Digene Corp. agreed yesterday to be acquired by a foreign company in a $1.6 billion cash and stock deal designed to boost the local biotech firm's international sales effort and speed technology development. Under the agreement, Netherlands-based Qiagen N.V. would pay $61.25 for Digene shares - up to $880 million - on a first-come, first-served basis. That represents a 37 percent premium over Digene's $44.77 closing price Friday on the Nasdaq.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 6, 2005
Scientists are identifying a variety of abnormalities in autistic children that might make it possible to diagnose the disorder at a much earlier age, when it may be possible to mitigate its effects or perhaps prevent it, researchers said yesterday. The findings "suggest the possibility for future diagnostic tests for autism at birth" and might mean that "we can get children into effective treatment much earlier than is now possible," said Dr. Helen Tager-Flusberg of the Boston University School of Medicine, who chaired the fourth International Meeting for Autism Research in Boston, where the research was reported.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | July 10, 2003
RICHMOND, Va. - Roche Holding AG may lose its license to use Igen International Inc. technology after an appeals court upheld yesterday Igen's right to end the contract even as the judges reduced by more than $486 million the damages Roche was told to pay. Roche, the world's biggest maker of diagnostic tests, will have to renegotiate the contract or lose access to technology used to evaluate body fluids for illnesses such as cancer and thyroid disorders....
BUSINESS
October 3, 2002
In the Region Igen says sales in quarter rose 28% to $4.6 million Igen International Inc. said yesterday that it had product sales of $4.6 million in its fiscal second quarter, a 28 percent increase from the corresponding period a year ago. The Gaithersburg maker of diagnostic-testing technology plans to report full financial results for the quarter that ended Sept. 30 after the market closes Oct. 29. Igen said record sales were driven by growth in its life sciences business, which sells products used by biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies, as well as sales to the Pentagon of products used in detecting biological agents and food-borne pathogens.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2002
Shares of Digene Corp. fell 19 percent yesterday after the Gaithersburg company announced that this year's revenue will fall below expectations because its agreement with the world's biggest maker of diagnostic tests failed to produce the expected sales for its human papillomavirus test. The company's revenue for the fiscal year that ended June 30 will be $48.5 million to $49 million, according to preliminary figures. Digene had expected revenue of $51 million for the year. Digene will report final results next month.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | July 2, 2002
Digene Corp., a Gaithersburg-based maker of diagnostic tests, announced yesterday the termination of its merger with Cytyc Corp. The decision was widely expected after the Federal Trade Commission voted last week to attempt to block the merger on anti-competition grounds. Evan Jones, Digene chairman and chief executive officer, said the key factor in cancellation of the merger was the company's unwillingness to fight an uncertain court battle with the FTC. "The litigation path could have taken up to a year in the courts, and we didn't feel - given the strength of our underlying operations - that would have been the best use of resources," Jones said.
NEWS
June 19, 2001
College schedules one-day seminars on Lyme disease Noting that Maryland has the seventh-highest rate of occurrence for Lyme disease in the country, Anne Arundel Community College has scheduled one-day courses on the tick-borne illness this summer - one for health care professionals and another for members of the general public. "Lyme Disease Update for Health Care Professionals" will be presented 8:30 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. June 30 and 5:45 p.m. to 10 p.m. Aug. 15 in Room 411 at the college's Glen Burnie Town Center site.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | July 2, 2002
Digene Corp., a Gaithersburg-based maker of diagnostic tests, announced yesterday the termination of its merger with Cytyc Corp. The decision was widely expected after the Federal Trade Commission voted last week to attempt to block the merger on anti-competition grounds. Evan Jones, Digene chairman and chief executive officer, said the key factor in cancellation of the merger was the company's unwillingness to fight an uncertain court battle with the FTC. "The litigation path could have taken up to a year in the courts, and we didn't feel - given the strength of our underlying operations - that would have been the best use of resources," Jones said.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | June 25, 2002
The Federal Trade Commission announced yesterday that it would seek a court injunction to block Digene Corp.'s acquisition by fellow diagnostic testing company Cytyc Corp., dealing the proposed merger a possibly lethal blow. The FTC, which is charged with ensuring fair competition, said in a statement that the combination would lead to reduced competition and increased prices for cervical cancer screening. The panel voted 5-0 to seek the court order. "This merger as proposed raises serious competitive concerns within the highly concentrated market for this important diagnostic tool," said Joseph J. Simons, director of the Bureau of Competition, referring to cervical cancer tests.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | February 1, 2002
Igen International Inc. said yesterday that its fiscal third-quarter loss narrowed as revenue grew and litigation costs were offset by a payment from its rival in a breach-of-contract suit, Roche Diagnostics. Based in Gaithersburg, the maker of diagnostic tests said it lost $9.2 million, or 48 cents per share, on revenue of $10.4 million. That compares with a loss of $16 millon, or $1.04 per share, on revenue of $8.5 million in the quarter that ended Dec. 31, 2000. The company said the 23 percent increase in quarterly revenue was due to increases in royalty income, product sales and contract revenue.
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