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By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2010
Since she first entered politics, state Sen. Lisa A. Gladden has kept a secret. More than a decade later, she wants to share it on her own terms: Gladden has multiple sclerosis. It's not all that dramatic, she says. Except for a weak left eye, the 46-year-old Baltimore Democrat says she is symptom-free. So why is she going public now about a condition she has kept to herself, her family and a handful of friends since she was first diagnosed in 1995? Gladden says she's tired of keeping the diagnosis a secret — as if it were something to be embarrassed about.
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NEWS
By Patricia Rice Doran | October 9, 2014
The mother's story was one that I have heard many times over the past few months, with some variation in detail. Her child, an A and B student with many friends and outside interests, had awoken one morning and refused to go to school. In the following weeks, he developed elaborate rituals that consumed his time, paralyzing fears that made it difficult to function in school or out of it, and intense and frequent rages. His teachers quickly ran out of ideas and strategies, and the student found himself failing five out of six classes.
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NEWS
By Ivan Oransky | August 22, 1997
NEW YORK -- Now that Deep Blue has bested mankind's chess champion, it may be time to revisit another far-fetched vision of the computer age: digital diagnosis. After all, if one machine's logic can muscle through 200 million chess moves a second to win a uniquely human game, why shouldn't another harness the power to synthesize signs and symptoms of disease?Computer-based diagnostic systems have been in development for more than 20 years. Not unlike mechanics' car-engine diagnostic systems, these programs typically incorporate artificial intelligence, or ''expert judgment,'' and one or more algorithms to come up with an assessment of clinical signs and symptoms leading to a list of diagnoses.
FEATURES
By Lisa Driscoll and The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2014
After 13 years of experience in Maryland real estate, David Orso decided to use his skills to better equip those entering the housing market by writing a book. That this effort would also become a way to pay tribute to his wife was a heartbreaking coincidence. The book, "Step Inside: The Unfiltered Truth About Listing and Selling Your Home," reveals insider advice on finding the best agent, listing and pricing a home, roles of listing agents, and how to go from listed to sold smoothly.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski | March 24, 2005
When Florida Gov. Jeb Bush challenged the diagnosis of Terri Schiavo's condition yesterday, attention focused on her state of awareness. On one point there is no dispute: Being "minimally conscious" is not the same as being in a so-called persistent vegetative state. The difficulty is in the diagnosis. Two neurologists examining the same person could, theoretically, reach different conclusions about the significance of even the slightest movement. Dr. Howard Moses, associate professor of neurology at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and consulting neurologist at St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson, said minimally conscious patients are generally unresponsive but can be aroused at times by physical stimuli or verbal commands.
NEWS
By KIM MURPHY and KIM MURPHY,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 12, 2006
SHELKOVSKAYA, Russia -- It started just after the midafternoon recess. As they lined up to return to class, Zareta Chimiyeva saw a girl in front of her collapse and begin convulsing wildly. A few minutes later, Zareta was at her desk when she said she smelled "a bad smell," and started feeling ill. She rushed out of the classroom but made it only as far as the stairs. "Darkness surrounded me, and there was darkness in my eyes, and I fell," said the 12-year-old from this small town in eastern Chechnya.
NEWS
By CARRIE MASON-DRAFFEN | October 5, 2005
I work for a large corporation that requires employees to bring in a doctor's note if we are out sick for three or more days. That's not the worst of it. The company also requires the note to include a diagnosis, prescribed medications for the illness and how long the employee was under a doctor's care. My physician refuses to include the diagnosis because he says it's illegal to publicize it. But the company will not compensate employees for sick leave unless the note includes a diagnosis.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor | July 25, 1991
Scientists at the Johns Hopkins University and the Shriners Hospital in Portland, Ore., have identified the gene responsible for Marfan syndrome, a discovery that has spawned a test capable of diagnosing the disorder before deadly symptoms appear.A cure might still be many years off, but the discovery could save lives, since it offers patients the chance of diagnosis early in life and treatment -- such as drugs or surgery -- to prevent or delay fatal complications.Within a year, scientists predict, a prospective parent whose family has been plagued by Marfan will be able to get a prenatal diagnosis.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 28, 2003
The disease, if it is a disease, afflicts most middle-aged and elderly women, and a large segment of men. But it has no symptoms, it is not clear what patients should do about it and it is being diagnosed more often. The condition is osteopenia, or low bone density. Many doctors consider it to be a first step toward osteoporosis, a serious disorder that leaves bone density extremely low and makes bones porous and prone to shattering. But researchers say that while bone density predicts fracture risk, more is involved, including age, family history and a poorly understood factor known as bone quality.
NEWS
By Carolyn Johnson and Carolyn Johnson,New York Times News Service | August 19, 2005
Nearly two centuries after King George III famously mistook a large tree for a Prussian king, produced red- and blue-tinged urine, and died blind, deaf and mad, scientists are still finalizing his diagnosis. In 1969, a mother-and-son team of psychiatrists with a penchant for diagnosing deranged, dead celebrities, suggested that the king suffered from a hereditary disorder called porphyria. The diagnosis stuck, and the British king's legacy brought fame to the rare metabolic disease -- though it remained hotly contested.
FEATURES
By Louis Krauss, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
Cathy Teodosio, a 55-year-old special education teacher, has been biking in fundraising events for more than two decades, but next weekend's Ride to Conquer Cancer will be especially personal for her. In April 2013, her father, Joseph Teodosio, was diagnosed with kidney cancer. Soon after moving from Connecticut to Fells Point in October, she heard about the event - which benefits Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center, Sibley Memorial and Suburban Hospitals. "It took several months with the move and his recovery for me to actually sign up for something like this, but I knew I had to do it," Cathy Teodosio said.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
The towering height that helped 20-year-old Isaiah Austin shoot to the top ranks of the NBA draft this year also was a symptom of the genetic disorder that, less than one month ago, ended his pro career before it began. But the 7-foot-1-inch Baylor University student counts himself lucky - at least it didn't end his life. Austin learned he has Marfan syndrome thanks to a blood test administered during the NBA draft process. Sometimes the diagnosis of the connective tissue disorder - which can cause the aorta, the main vessel that carries blood from the heart, to grow until it bursts - comes too late.
NEWS
April 17, 2014
I write in response to Susan Peschin's recent commentary on Alzheimer's disease ("Alzheimer's again gets the short shrift," April 14). Ms. Peschin contends that we are not doing enough to screen for Alzheimer's Disease, and she faults the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, an independent panel charged with developing guidelines for primary care clinicians, for not recommending widespread dementia testing. As a geriatric physician who has been caring for dementia patients for more than 20 years, I have found several problems with screening.
NEWS
By Michelle Landrum | April 6, 2014
My bookshelves attest to my worries. They hold book after book about parenting, about temperamental children, about children with sensory challenges, about raising boys, about how to get an accurate diagnosis for your child, about the importance of avoiding diagnostic labels for your child, and so on. Today, in hindsight, I know this: I was wasting precious time on the wrong things. Instead of looking in books and online for clues about my preschooler, our youngest of two sons, I should have acted sooner, been more persistent with his pediatrician about my concerns, and called my county's Infants & Toddlers program.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2013
Two years after Giuliana Rancic was diagnosed with breast cancer , the E! News anchor says she has "come to a really good place where it doesn't take over my life everyday. " Rancic, who grew up in Bethesda and was scheduled to visit Maryland Live! Casino last week in honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, told CBS.com that she was not as "sad or rattled" about the diagnosis now and was focused on "empowering other women" to seek testing and treatment. The television star discovered she had breast cancer while undergoing in vitro fertilization treatments two years ago. Since then, she and husband Bill Rancic have welcomed a son born to a surrogate mother.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2013
The Orioles received good news today after Manny Machado's visit to Dr. James Andrews in Gulf Breeze, Fla. Machado went to see Dr. Andrews to receive a second opinion on his injured left knee, and Andrews' evaluation concurred with that of the Orioles team doctors, according to an industry source. Orioles team orthopedist Dr. John Wilckens recommended a conservative approach of rest and rehab and no surgery. The team hopes Machado can be doing light running drills in six to eight weeks and be ready for spring training.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,Special to the Sun | January 26, 2007
Late last fall, Dartmouth Medical School researchers reported in the journal Cancer that 100 percent of newly diagnosed breast cancer patients experienced at least some level of distress, and nearly half met the criteria for a significant psychiatric disorder such as major depression or post-traumatic stress disorder. Well, duh! Is it really news that a serious medical diagnosis can shake a person to the core? The only surprise, to me, is that a study like this is necessary. While some medical schools are adding classes in things such as how to deliver bad news, the medical establishment as a whole still isn't as good as it could be at helping people who go in a heartbeat from merely having a medical appointment to wondering how long they have to live.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,special to the sun | September 16, 2007
Holly Campbell is a young doctor with a problem. Shaken by her mother's death, Holly quits her job, leaves her boyfriend and finds herself living in England, unsure of what to do next. Dr. Campbell is the fictional counterpart of real-life doctor and novelist Maggie Leffler, who grew up in Columbia. In her first book, Diagnosis of Love, Leffler follows Holly's adventures in medicine and love. Unlike her main character, Leffler has always known what she wanted to do with her life -- become a doctor and a writer.
NEWS
By Joseph R. Hughes | January 27, 2013
Here's a big question: When does old age begin? Will 30 years do it? Is being 50 and the holder of an AARP card with senior discounts enough? Both would be wrong guesses. Until recently, I hadn't thought much about it. Yet, I got the answer to this eminent question without asking. A while ago, I saw my physician for a semi-annual examination and health review. Near the end of our meeting, the doctor declared for the record that I had arrived at old age. Crash the cymbals and blare the trumpets!
HEALTH
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2012
A junior at Glen Burnie High School in Anne Arundel County died Tuesday after becoming ill the day before with symptoms associated with bacterial meningitis, school officials said Wednesday. A letter was sent home to students' parents Wednesday outlining the girl's death and providing facts about bacterial meningitis, which is less contagious than viral meningitis but still deadly, said Bob Mosier, a school system spokesman. The girl's illness has not been confirmed by doctors or a medical examiner to have been from meningitis, but the school system - in consultation with the county health department - decided to move proactively to alert the school community in case meningitis is confirmed, Mosier said.
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