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By Patrick Ercolano and Patrick Ercolano,Staff Writer | February 26, 1992
The number of people diagnosed with AIDS in Baltimore jumped sevenfold from 1985 through 1990, and the number of infected people in the surrounding counties more than tripled, according to statistics compiled by the state."
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NEWS
February 4, 2000
Sister Madonna Kolbenschlag, 64, an author and former House of Representatives policy analyst, died Saturday of a stroke in Santiago, Chile. She was 64. She taught American studies and women's studies at the University of Notre Dame in the 1980s, and was a legislative aide and research consultant in the U.S. House. She also was involved in human rights investigations in Central America. Thomas Joseph Peterson, 102, the oldest member of the Nez Perce tribe, died Sunday in Tacoma, Wash.
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NEWS
By NEWSDAY | January 25, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The number of New York City residents dying of AIDS plummeted nearly 30 percent from 1995 to 1996, far and away the most significant drop since the epidemic began.More than 7,000 people died of AIDS in New York City in 1995, but just 5,000 died last year, according to death records monitored by Dr. Mary Ann Chiasson and her staff at the New York City Department of Health.Experts at the fourth Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections in Washington said preliminary reports indicate that there are decreases being seen in other U.S. cities.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | December 2, 1997
Advances in AIDS therapies have begun to spare many children from acquiring the deadly virus in the womb, but authorities expressed concern yesterday that a rising infection rate among women of childbearing age has thwarted progress.As the nation observed World AIDS Day, doctors said they were encouraged by data showing that drug regimens have reduced the chance of passing the virus from mother to child from 25 percent to as low as 5 percent -- 5 out of every 100 children born to women receiving state-of-the-art care.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Staff Writer | December 12, 1993
The grim demographics of AIDS have made Maryland one of the states hardest hit by the epidemic.Though 19th in population, the state ranks in the top 10 for two important AIDS indicators: rate per 100,000 population and total cases since 1981.Maryland has the nation's eighth-highest rate, 47.6 documented cases of acquired immune deficiency syndrome per 100,000 residents, according to the national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.And, with 7,420 Marylanders diagnosed with the fatal disease since 1981, Maryland ranks ninth in cumulative AIDS cases.
NEWS
February 4, 2000
Sister Madonna Kolbenschlag, 64, an author and former House of Representatives policy analyst, died Saturday of a stroke in Santiago, Chile. She was 64. She taught American studies and women's studies at the University of Notre Dame in the 1980s, and was a legislative aide and research consultant in the U.S. House. She also was involved in human rights investigations in Central America. Thomas Joseph Peterson, 102, the oldest member of the Nez Perce tribe, died Sunday in Tacoma, Wash.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | December 2, 1997
Advances in AIDS therapies have begun to spare many children from acquiring the deadly virus in the womb, but authorities expressed concern yesterday that a rising infection rate among women of childbearing age has thwarted progress.As the nation observed World AIDS Day, doctors said they were encouraged by data showing that drug regimens have reduced the chance of passing the virus from mother to child from 25 percent to as low as 5 percent -- 5 out of every 100 children born to women receiving state-of-the-art care.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff writer | October 29, 1991
They're invisible in most school halls. Scared of being shunned by their peers, they laugh at the same jokes, put up the same posters andbrag with the rest of the guys in the locker room.In suburban high schools, where the pressure to fit in can be overwhelming, few teen-agers openly admit they're gay. But that anonymity often is a double-edged sword. While it shields them from being taunted or beaten up by classmates, it also can lead them to take dangerous risks.A rapidly growing number of Anne Arundel teen-agers and men in their 20s have been diagnosed with AIDS in the last year.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 1, 1993
As many as 40,000 Americans who are HIV-positive will start 1993 with a diagnosis of AIDS, the consequence of a new and more inclusive official definition that is likely to place a strain on already strapped social-service agencies and add to the emotional trauma of many who are infected.The broader definition, drafted by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention after a year of debate, is intended to give public health officials a truer picture of the scope of the disease by adding symptoms often found in women and intravenous drug users, who have been undercounted in the past.
NEWS
October 9, 1991
It would be gratifying to be able to report that after a decade of the AIDS scourge, public awareness in this country had been fully raised in order to combat the deadly epidemic. That is not the case. Most people do not even know that October has been designated AIDS Awareness Month. And today public policy regarding AIDS is, if anything, more confused and ineffectual than ever.Despite the extraordinary scientific advances that have allowed researchers to isolate the HIV virus and trace its routes of transmission through the population, AIDS has emerged as an unmitigated worldwide public health catastrophe.
NEWS
By NEWSDAY | January 25, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The number of New York City residents dying of AIDS plummeted nearly 30 percent from 1995 to 1996, far and away the most significant drop since the epidemic began.More than 7,000 people died of AIDS in New York City in 1995, but just 5,000 died last year, according to death records monitored by Dr. Mary Ann Chiasson and her staff at the New York City Department of Health.Experts at the fourth Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections in Washington said preliminary reports indicate that there are decreases being seen in other U.S. cities.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Staff Writer | December 12, 1993
The grim demographics of AIDS have made Maryland one of the states hardest hit by the epidemic.Though 19th in population, the state ranks in the top 10 for two important AIDS indicators: rate per 100,000 population and total cases since 1981.Maryland has the nation's eighth-highest rate, 47.6 documented cases of acquired immune deficiency syndrome per 100,000 residents, according to the national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.And, with 7,420 Marylanders diagnosed with the fatal disease since 1981, Maryland ranks ninth in cumulative AIDS cases.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Staff Writer | November 21, 1993
A church is supposed to comfort the spiritually needy, but a Columbia man who has HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, says he and others with the virus often are shunned or ignored by religious congregations."
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 1, 1993
As many as 40,000 Americans who are HIV-positive will start 1993 with a diagnosis of AIDS, the consequence of a new and more inclusive official definition that is likely to place a strain on already strapped social-service agencies and add to the emotional trauma of many who are infected.The broader definition, drafted by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention after a year of debate, is intended to give public health officials a truer picture of the scope of the disease by adding symptoms often found in women and intravenous drug users, who have been undercounted in the past.
NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff Writer | November 19, 1992
It bothered Jessica Vanderhoof that AIDS patients at an Arnold outpatient house would have to walk down crumbled outdoor steps this winter to reach the washer and dryer in the basement.So she and several classmates from Anne Arundel Community College volunteered Saturday to rebuild the steps as part of a class project on group dynamics."I really don't know anybody who is HIV-positive, but I wanted to help them. Nobody wants to live in a house with a shabby exterior," said Ms. Vanderhoof, 20.While they were at it, the four women planted pink and yellow mums, tulip bulbs and small shrubs to spruce up the exterior.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | April 16, 1992
A nationwide team of scientists has found that people who take the anti-AIDS drug, AZT, early in their infection not only delay symptoms but also live longer than those who wait until they are diagnosed with full-blown AIDS."
NEWS
April 13, 1992
The disclosure that tennis star Arthur Ashe has AIDS is only the latest evidence that the path of the disease is shifting away from gay white men.Mr. Ashe appears to have been the victim of a tainted blood transfusion in 1983, before screening was as effective as it is now. His exposure is rare, but increasingly often new cases are cropping up among minorities, heterosexual intravenous drug users and women. Last month, the federal Centers for Disease Control reported that AIDS cases in the nation's capital will triple by mid-decade; in the Baltimore area, the number of AIDS patients is expected to double, to some 1,600 cases, by 1995, when as many as 25,000 people in the region may be infected with the virus that causes AIDS.
NEWS
By Doug Birch and Doug Birch,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | December 22, 1990
ANNAPOLIS -- Gov. William Donald Schaefer said yesterday that a close friend was now "scared to death" because her doctor died of AIDS, and he thinks physicians should tell their patients if they have the disease."
NEWS
April 13, 1992
The disclosure that tennis star Arthur Ashe has AIDS is only the latest evidence that the path of the disease is shifting away from gay white men.Mr. Ashe appears to have been the victim of a tainted blood transfusion in 1983, before screening was as effective as it is now. His exposure is rare, but increasingly often new cases are cropping up among minorities, heterosexual intravenous drug users and women. Last month, the federal Centers for Disease Control reported that AIDS cases in the nation's capital will triple by mid-decade; in the Baltimore area, the number of AIDS patients is expected to double, to some 1,600 cases, by 1995, when as many as 25,000 people in the region may be infected with the virus that causes AIDS.
NEWS
By Patrick Ercolano and Patrick Ercolano,Staff Writer | February 26, 1992
The number of people diagnosed with AIDS in Baltimore jumped sevenfold from 1985 through 1990, and the number of infected people in the surrounding counties more than tripled, according to statistics compiled by the state."
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