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Diabetic Retinopathy

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By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Contributing Writer | June 16, 1992
Q: My daughter is a diabetic, and I am concerned about the effects of diabetes on her eyes. She has been diabetic for 12 years and has only been to an ophthalmologist once. How often should she have her eyes checked?Diabetic damage to the eyes (diabetic retinopathy) is a frequent complication of both Type I (juvenile or insulin-dependent) and Type II (adult onset or non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus. The frequency of retinopathy increases with the duration of diabetes. Twenty years after the diagnosis of diabetes, some retinopathy is present in nearly all persons with Type I diabetes and in more than 60 percent of those with Type II. Among adults in this country, diabetic retinopathy is the most common cause of new cases of blindness.
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By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 28, 2012
Diabetes is the leading cause of new cases of blindness among adults 20 to 74 years old. Dr. Michael Grodin, co-director of retinal services and director of clinical research at Katzen Eye Group, discusses eye problems and the link to diabetes. Why is blindness from diabetes becoming so prevalent? As the number of people with diabetes is sharply rising, more people are developing complications like diabetic retinopathy — damage to the retina caused by diabetes. From 2000 to 2010, there was an 89 percent increase in the number of people with diabetic retinopathy, which is almost 7.7 million people.
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NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 28, 2012
Diabetes is the leading cause of new cases of blindness among adults 20 to 74 years old. Dr. Michael Grodin, co-director of retinal services and director of clinical research at Katzen Eye Group, discusses eye problems and the link to diabetes. Why is blindness from diabetes becoming so prevalent? As the number of people with diabetes is sharply rising, more people are developing complications like diabetic retinopathy — damage to the retina caused by diabetes. From 2000 to 2010, there was an 89 percent increase in the number of people with diabetic retinopathy, which is almost 7.7 million people.
HEALTH
By Kate Shatzkin | kate.shatzkin@baltsun.com | November 16, 2009
Diabetic retinopathy is the most common cause of moderate and severe vision loss in working-age Americans. It is a major public health problem now, and it will become even more so as the incidence of type 2 diabetes increases, says Dr. Peter Campochiaro, a professor of ophthalmology and neuroscience at the Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins. • Obesity predisposes people to type 2 diabetes, and thus, to retinopathy. A healthy diet and regular exercise help reduce obesity and the risk of diabetes.
HEALTH
By Kate Shatzkin | kate.shatzkin@baltsun.com | November 16, 2009
Diabetic retinopathy is the most common cause of moderate and severe vision loss in working-age Americans. It is a major public health problem now, and it will become even more so as the incidence of type 2 diabetes increases, says Dr. Peter Campochiaro, a professor of ophthalmology and neuroscience at the Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins. • Obesity predisposes people to type 2 diabetes, and thus, to retinopathy. A healthy diet and regular exercise help reduce obesity and the risk of diabetes.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | October 28, 2002
A medical technology company from Virginia is the latest firm to relocate to Howard County, thanks to a $100,000 investment by the state. EyeTel Inc., which develops equipment to help detect eye disease, moved its headquarters from Chantilly, Va., to Savage this month after the state Department of Business and Economic Development agreed to invest in the company through the Enterprise Investment Fund, closing its first round of financing in which the...
NEWS
By Korky Vann and By Korky Vann,Special to the Sun | October 6, 2002
Three years ago, when the vision in her right eye started to become cloudy, 85-year-old Georgia Just didn't know what was happening. She'd had the same pair of glasses for years and had never had any serious problems with her eyesight. Suddenly faces were blurry, household tasks were increasingly difficult, and reading and watching television were impossible. A retinal specialist told her she had developed a blood clot behind her eye. Laser surgery helped stabilize her remaining eyesight, but couldn't restore the vision she'd lost.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | May 28, 1997
An innovative eye care program in East Baltimore will expand in the city so that more poor people may improve their vision, prevent eye disease and keep ailing eyes from becoming worse.But for the program to succeed, a much greater number who are offered services must accept the low-cost or free help, officials said. Two-thirds of those who could have gotten help haven't.About 1,100 people -- roughly 95 percent of them black, including many who have received little or no eye care during their lives -- have been screened in the past 16 months at churches and community centers.
NEWS
July 31, 2003
Free eye screenings to detect glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy, two of the country's leading causes of blindness, will be offered starting today at Mondawmin Mall. The screenings are being offered through Focus on Eyes, a partnership of the University of Maryland School of Medicine, Times Community Services and the mall's Penn Optical store, to detect vision problems in the African-American community. The painless screening uses a retinal imaging camera to photograph the eye without dilation.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Staff Writer | March 29, 1994
Arnold Ray believes he owes his vision to a free diabetic eye screening program offered by the Johns Hopkins Hospital's Wilmer Eye Institute.Spurred on by the American Academy of Ophthalmology's Diabetes 2000 Project, a campaign to eliminate preventable diabetic blindness by the turn of the century, doctors at the Wilmer decided in November 1992 to begin offering free eye checks. Since then, 189 people have taken advantage of the offer, says Dolores Rytel, who coordinates the screening program.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | October 28, 2002
A medical technology company from Virginia is the latest firm to relocate to Howard County, thanks to a $100,000 investment by the state. EyeTel Inc., which develops equipment to help detect eye disease, moved its headquarters from Chantilly, Va., to Savage this month after the state Department of Business and Economic Development agreed to invest in the company through the Enterprise Investment Fund, closing its first round of financing in which the...
NEWS
By Korky Vann and By Korky Vann,Special to the Sun | October 6, 2002
Three years ago, when the vision in her right eye started to become cloudy, 85-year-old Georgia Just didn't know what was happening. She'd had the same pair of glasses for years and had never had any serious problems with her eyesight. Suddenly faces were blurry, household tasks were increasingly difficult, and reading and watching television were impossible. A retinal specialist told her she had developed a blood clot behind her eye. Laser surgery helped stabilize her remaining eyesight, but couldn't restore the vision she'd lost.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | May 28, 1997
An innovative eye care program in East Baltimore will expand in the city so that more poor people may improve their vision, prevent eye disease and keep ailing eyes from becoming worse.But for the program to succeed, a much greater number who are offered services must accept the low-cost or free help, officials said. Two-thirds of those who could have gotten help haven't.About 1,100 people -- roughly 95 percent of them black, including many who have received little or no eye care during their lives -- have been screened in the past 16 months at churches and community centers.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Contributing Writer | June 16, 1992
Q: My daughter is a diabetic, and I am concerned about the effects of diabetes on her eyes. She has been diabetic for 12 years and has only been to an ophthalmologist once. How often should she have her eyes checked?Diabetic damage to the eyes (diabetic retinopathy) is a frequent complication of both Type I (juvenile or insulin-dependent) and Type II (adult onset or non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus. The frequency of retinopathy increases with the duration of diabetes. Twenty years after the diagnosis of diabetes, some retinopathy is present in nearly all persons with Type I diabetes and in more than 60 percent of those with Type II. Among adults in this country, diabetic retinopathy is the most common cause of new cases of blindness.
NEWS
April 22, 2007
Screenings offered at medical van Upper Chesapeake HealthLink's medical van will be in Upper Chesapeake Medical Center's parking lot M, MacPhail and Tollgate roads, from 4 to 7 p.m. Tuesday. Free blood pressure, sleep disorder and body fat analysis screenings will be offered. Also available: cholesterol screenings for $10; osteoporosis screenings for $15; and cardiac risk assessments for $20 (cash or check only). Information: 800-515-0044. Ultrasound labs are accredited The echocardiography laboratories at Harford Memorial Hospital and Upper Chesapeake Medical Center have been granted accreditation by the Intersocietal Commission for the Accreditation of Echocardiography Laboratories.
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