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Diabetes

NEWS
By A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 13, 1996
It was bad enough having to grow up with two younger sisters, but then Kristan Bosch learned that she had diabetes. Her sisters could have candy, and she couldn't, she complained.Worse, she felt she was the only seventh-grader at Old MillMiddle School with the disease until she learned about the support group founded by school nurse Beverly Lesher and met Becky, Christopher and Eric -- other Old Mill students with the disease."I've learned I'm not the only one with diabetes," Kristan said.
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NEWS
By LOWELL E. SUNDERLAND | June 16, 2002
NOT EVERY memorable player in sports scores the most points, wins championships or flashes super-athletic moves. Some players become unforgettable by overcoming adversity. Columbia youth soccer coach Jill Fritsch just finished her fourth season with one such player. Her name is Sara McNeeley and, well, it seems appropriate that she introduce herself to you. "So, tell me about Sara McNeeley," a grown-up stranger said as a way of starting an interview with her one afternoon last week. "I'm 12 years old, I'm going to be in the eighth grade and I have diabetes," Sara replied.
NEWS
By NEWPORT NEWS DAILY PRESS | January 13, 1999
NORFOLK, Va. -- Researchers from NASA Langley and Eastern Virginia Medical School are teaming up to develop an interactive computer system that could help improve blood flow in diabetic patients. Loss of blood flow can lead to nerve damage, gangrene and amputation.The technology, which draws on NASA experiments for airplane pilots, lets patients see a simulated, three-dimensional network of their own blood vessels. Shown as red and blue images, the vessels move with the patient's own pulse and contract and expand depending how well blood is flowing.
FEATURES
By Linda Siemon and Linda Siemon,Special to the Sun | December 15, 1999
For most people, candy and desserts are sweet indulgences to be enjoyed anytime. But for those with diabetes, the sugary temptations can make them sick, very sick.This can be especially difficult for the parents of children with diabetes. They constantly have to monitor what their child is eating, especially during the holidays, when treats seem to be everywhere."It takes over your life," says Joyce Mason of Glen Arm, whose 9-year-old son, Tyler, was diagnosed with juvenile diabetes when he was 2. "You don't have a child with diabetes.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 27, 2001
The American Diabetes Association issued new dietary guidelines yesterday saying that people with the disease can eat sweets occasionally as long as they keep their blood sugar levels under control. The new guidelines are designed to improve the treatment and prevention of diabetes and to simplify the lives of an estimated 16 million Americans who have it. Although specialists have advised patients for years that they can consume sugary foods if they control their blood sugar levels, there is still widespread belief that a person with diabetes should never eat concentrated carbohydrates, such as sweets.
FEATURES
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,Sun reporter | March 27, 2008
In the hunt for better treatments for the growing and related epidemics of diabetes and obesity, researchers may have uncovered an unlikely drug: sugar. Tagatose is a natural, low-calorie sugar that has been used to sweeten such things as orange juice and candy in Europe. And, for a short time, it was used in Diet Pepsi Slurpees at 7-Eleven in the United States. But now tagatose is in a yearlong clinical trial to show that it's not just a palate pleaser but a manager for the most common form of diabetes, Type 2. If the trial goes well, it could be a big step in tagatose becoming a medicine, and eventually, an uber-sweet diet aid, according to an article in February's Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.
SPORTS
By Joe Strauss and Joe Strauss,SUN STAFF | July 25, 1999
On his best days, Orioles fifth starter Jason Johnson carries what his manager describes as an "electric" fastball plus an obedient breaking ball and a developing changeup. Johnson also possesses the potential that the club sees in Sidney Ponson and Matt Riley, arms projected as the backbone of their rotation for at least the next four seasons.Johnson also lives with diabetes, a disease so intrusive he often carries a syringe with him to the bullpen. He is never far from the kit that tests his blood sugar level every two or three waking hours.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 17, 1998
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- An experimental insulin inhaler worked just as well as injections in a study of diabetics, which was released yesterday at the annual American Diabetes Association conference in Chicago.If the inhaler is effective in large trials starting this fall, it may some day replace most or all of the daily shots that diabetics need, a University of Miami professor said in releasing the study."This could dramatically change the way we treat diabetes," said Dr. Jay Skyler, lead researcher in the study.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 27, 2001
ROCKVILLE - Otis Brawley tells the story with no rancor, no anger, but with more than a bit of sadness. It is a story of his mother. Brawley heads the federal Office of Special Populations Research for the National Cancer Institute here, essentially in charge of finding out why there is a gap in cancer care for minorities and other groups and how to change that. It is a warm spring day when he tells the story. But when it is over, there is a chill in the air. His mother has diabetes; she has had it for a long time.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,Sun Reporter | February 21, 2007
When we first heard about Maggie Smith's situation, it didn't seem as serious as some we've dealt with in The Sun's monthly Make Over My Meal series. Boy, were we wrong. The 32-year-old working mother of two does a good job of getting a meal on the table every night in spite of a lengthy commute from Owings Mills to her home in Frankford. Usually the family has dinner together, and everyone pretty much eats the same thing. While 4-year-old Melina and 2-year-old Myles aren't great eaters, they enjoy some fruits; and Smith makes sure they drink lots of milk.
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