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By Dave Rosenthal | January 18, 2012
Paula Deen's disclosure that she has type 2 Diabetes has triggered some harsh reactions. For years, Deen has featured high-calorie Southern foods in her cookbooks and on television. Some  folks are riled by the fact that that she was doing it while aware of her own diabetes, a disease that has been linked to a poor diets and excess weight. And they poked at Deen for aligning her new webste with Victoza, a diabetes medicine made by Novo Nordisk. Fellow celebrity chef Anthony Bourdain -- who has famously called Deen "the most dangerous person in America" -- issued a veiled tweet that did not mention her name, but was taken by many to refer to her. It said: "Thinking of getting into the leg-breaking business, so I can profitably sell crutches later.
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NEWS
October 3, 2014
Classes at hospital Howard County General Hospital will sponsor the following classes at the HCGH Wellness Center, Suite 100, 10710 Charter Drive, Columbia unless otherwise listed. Advanced registration for all programs at hcgh.com. Information: 410-740-7601. •CPR classes. Earn a two-year American Heart Association completion card. Classes are held from 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 8 and Monday, Oct. 27. This is not a health care provider course. Cost $55. •Depression.
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FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 20, 1996
Although my diabetes was diagnosed about 10 years ago, I had no significant problems with it until this past summer when both of my feet began to hurt, The pain has been getting worse, and pain killers like aspirin have not helped at all. Is there any treatment?You are almost certainly suffering from a common complication of diabetes referred to as distal or peripheral neuropathy.The most frequent symptoms are numbness and decreased sensitivity to touch and other sensory stimuli; tingling, pricking, or crawling sensations; and pain that can be severe at times.
HEALTH
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
The Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene has been awarded a $3.5 million federal grant to invest in diabetes and heart disease prevention efforts in five designated regions in the state, including Baltimore. The award is one of 21 grants totaling $69.5 million and issued to city and state health departments across the country by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, under an initiative "to support public health efforts to reduce chronic diseases, promote healthier lifestyles, reduce health disparities, and control health care spending," DHMH said Thursday.
NEWS
By NANCY MENEFEE JACKSON and NANCY MENEFEE JACKSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 6, 1999
In November of 1997, Linda McKeldin had to depend on her mother to dress her. She was facing surgery for a disc in her back that had herniated into her spinal cord, and she had just found out she was diabetic.Next Sunday, McKeldin -- fully recovered, 23 pounds lighter and with her diabetes under control -- is looking forward to competing in the second annual Avon Running -- Baltimore 5K Walk/Fun Run. "I'm going to try to run the 5K," says McKeldin, 48, of Ellicott City, "and next year hopefully I'll be able to run 10K."
NEWS
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2005
The people at St. Stephen African Methodist Episcopal Church in Essex believe their church and other black churches have been called by the spirit to break diabetes' destructive grip on the black community. Therefore, while St. Stephen still offers that old-time religion - with hymns to warm the soul and a Bible-based message to quench the hunger for spiritual knowledge - its health ministry might also throw in advice on healthy eating and exercise during the service. "We believe in the total development of a person," says St. Stephen's pastor, the Rev. William Gray III. "It's not good enough to be spiritual and not take care of the temple God has given you," he adds.
NEWS
April 12, 2005
Two medical institutions are collaborating in a five-year study to see whether intensive patient education and physician training can reduce complications of hypertension and diabetes. The University of Maryland School of Medicine is recruiting 800 people with hypertension, and Bon Secours Baltimore Health System is enrolling 800 diabetics. Doctors will counsel and follow them to see whether greater attention to diet, medication and other factors makes a difference. The study will focus primarily on blacks, who suffer disproportionately from both diseases.
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | August 31, 2006
The pain is still fresh, but Mary Ida Vandross has to find a way to face the music. A year after burying the last of her four children, the great song stylist Luther Vandross, the Philadelphia resident can hardly bear to hear recordings of her son's famed champagne tenor. "I'm getting a little adjusted to listening," she says. "Before, I just couldn't do it. It's one day at a time." She's promoting The Ultimate Luther Vandross, a posthumous best-of collection with two previously unreleased songs.
FEATURES
By Gerri Kobren | September 24, 1991
After growing up with a diabetic father, Tom Parks knew enough about diabetes to recognize the symptoms even before he was diagnosed six years ago.But it happened while he was on the road with his comedy act.And it seemed so unfair: "Wait!" he told the doctor. "I'm in Missouri and I've got diabetes?"The 41-year-old comedian, co-anchor of "Not Necessarily the News" on HBO, was in Baltimore last week for the 18th annual meeting of the American Association of Diabetes Educators. A spokesman for the manufacturer of a blood-sugar measuring device, as well as a member of the board of the American Diabetes Association, he says he wants to show that there is, indeed, life after diabetes.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 2, 1996
I have been worried ever since my doctor discovered my diabetes three years ago, because my mother had a lower leg amputated as a result of this disease. What can I do to avoid an amputation?Diabetes is often complicated by a decrease or loss of sensation in the feet (peripheral neuropathy) and accelerated hardening of the arteries (atherosclerosis) that obstructs the delivery of blood to the feet. With the poor sensation, minor injuries or blisters often go unrecognized and untreated. Reduced blood supply prevents healing, leading to infections and the development of ulcers.
HEALTH
By Jonathan Pitts and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
As 7-year-old Zara Cheek packed her bags for her first sleep-away camp this summer, she found herself looking forward to more than just swimming, going on hikes and eating S'mores for two glorious weeks. To her, the experience meant a chance to live like a normal kid for a while - and even, quite possibly, to help thousands of others afflicted with the illness that has shaped her life. Zara, who lives in West Baltimore and started third grade this fall, is one of about 2 million Americans who suffer from Type 1 diabetes, a chronic and potentially lethal disorder of the pancreas that leaves the body unable to make insulin or turn blood sugar into the energy it needs.
NEWS
June 3, 2014
The Sun's recent article regarding diabetes test strips ( "Resold diabetes strips cause health concern," May 31) ends with a quote asking the question, "...how can we get this important expense covered for patients so they don't have to feel they need to turn to an alternative?" Unfortunately, The Sun misses the most important point and that is: "How can test strips, literally made in the millions, cost so much at the retail level?" That is where the investigation should be directed.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2014
On Charles Street, inside the Belvedere Galleria, a company run from a small office offers cash for people's leftover diabetes strips, the tiny tabs used to test glucose levels, which are crucial to managing the disease. An Internet search for "sell diabetes strips" turns up numerous websites offering to buy the strips via mail. The demand for more affordable strips — some brands cost $1 each and the typical testing regimen runs three times a day — has created what some call a "gray" market for reselling them.
NEWS
April 4, 2014
We were pleased to read the article "Sister of 11-year-old with diabetes raises $110K for research " (April 1), in The Sun because of our own family's experience with type 1 diabetes. Over 10 years ago, our grandson was diagnosed with the disease and has grown up so much faster than his brother or his sister who do not have it. We have watched him under our daughter's supervision endure a daily regimen involving checking blood sugar and multiple insulin injections daily so he can live.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2013
Normal wounds heal within weeks, but for people with health problems, the injuries may fester for much longer. In the worst cases, persistent wounds that aren't treated can infect the bone and even lead to amputation. Dr. Kapil Gopal, vascular surgeon and assistant professor of surgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and medical director of the Maryland Wound Healing Center at the University of Maryland Medical Center's Midtown Campus, talks about treatment options for severe wounds.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
Donna L. Hansen, a former congressional staffer whose lifelong struggle with diabetes led her to become an advocate for diabetes and cardiac research, died Nov. 15 from heart and kidney failure at Carroll Hospice's Dove House. The Sykesville resident was 56. "She was diagnosed with diabetes when she was 8 years old, suffered her first heart attack when she was 21, and a second heart attack when she was 31," said her husband of 25 years, Steven Hansen. "When her heart disease forced her to quit full-time work, she devoted herself to helping those with diabetes and cardiac disease, and helped initiate an important new outreach program in her Columbia church," said Mr. Hansen.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 30, 1992
In a discovery that could lead to a revolution in the way infants are fed, researchers have implicated exposure to a common milk protein during the first nine months of life as a major cause of insulin-dependent diabetes, which affects more than 1 million Americans.If confirmed by further studies, the controversial findings by Canadian and Finnish researchers could bring about a sharp decrease in the incidence of diabetes. About one-quarter of the population is genetically susceptible to diabetes.
FEATURES
By Judy Peres and Judy Peres,Chicago Tribune | June 21, 2007
Medicine has made life-saving advances in treating and preventing heart disease, the major killer of people with diabetes, yet female diabetics are dying at higher rates than three decades ago, researchers reported this week. "There's good news here; we are making progress," said Dr. Deborah Burnet, a diabetes expert at the University of Chicago. "The bad news is it appears to be limited to men." The trend has ominous public-health consequences, experts note. Diabetes is growing more common in the U.S. as the population gets older and fatter, and elderly women are the fastest-growing segment of society.
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