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By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2010
A state employee who posted the Social Security numbers of nearly 3,000 Maryland residents online for weeks has been fired, according to the Maryland Department of Human Resources. "As of today, the employee is no longer employed with the state," said Nancy Lineman, DHR spokeswoman. She declined to comment further about the employee, stating that this was a personnel matter. "We are still not sure why he used the data in an unauthorized way," Lineman said. Lineman said that the DHR is still investigating this incident and that no decision has been made about the filing of criminal charges.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 4, 2014
Maryland's practice of shoring up its foster care budget by appropriating the Social Security survivor benefits of the children in its care is questionable and merits close scrutiny by legislators. Maryland is hardly alone in taking this step, and prohibiting it would present financial and logistical hurdles. But there is a strong case to be made that it is unfair to the children the state is supposed to be caring for. The state has an obligation to care for children who are abused or neglected, and the children are not expected to pay the state back.
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NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2011
Federal officials won't reimburse Maryland's Department of Human Resources for nearly $10 million in foster care-related expenses that the state had expected to recoup, according to a legislative audit released Wednesday. The funds would have paid Maryland for in-home, "pre-placement" services, provided to children with the aim of preventing them from being removed to foster care placement. The U.S Department of Health and Human Services denied the claim because DHR did not have a process to document that the children it served were in imminent risk of entering foster care, the auditors stated in the report.
NEWS
January 11, 2014
Fifty years ago this week, in his State of the Union address to the nation, President Lyndon B. Johnson announced a new "War on Poverty. " The legislation he proposed and was ultimately passed by Congress made reducing poverty a national priority. As a result, there are far fewer Americans living in poverty today than in 1964. Some of the key safety net programs the Maryland Department of Human Resources administers today were created as part of that war, including SNAP (food stamps)
NEWS
March 18, 2010
We thank The Sun for both the article and editorial that appeared in your March 18 edition ("State to extend review of those who have lost parental rights" and "Protecting our youngest"). They called attention to the need to move with haste to strengthen regulations implementing our state's current birth match law, bipartisan legislation that we authored. The lives of children hang in the balance. We have been haunted by a cadre of questions since the death of one-month-old Rajahnthon Haynie, a death in which his mother has been charged with murder.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | May 30, 2005
Elisha B. Pulivarti, an official at the state Department of Human Resources with close ties to a group home company regulated by the agency, has resigned. Pulivarti stepped down from the state post after a DHR investigation found that he was serving on the board of Evershine Residential Services Inc., a company that operates 10 group homes licensed by the department, DHR spokesman Norris West said yesterday. State regulations specifically bar agency employees from serving on the boards of group home companies.
NEWS
July 26, 2010
People who are wary of identity theft and protective of their personal information will find the actions of a state worker at the Maryland Department of Human Resources unsettling. The Social Security numbers of almost 3,000 Maryland residents who filed for assistance at the DHR were posted on the Internet for several months before it was discovered ("DHR fires worker who posted Social Security numbers on the Internet," July 23). Government agencies need to impose stricter policies and tougher regulations against employees violating the confidentiality of the people.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2010
A Maryland Department of Human Resources employee was placed on administrative leave after posting the Social Security numbers and other personal information of nearly 3,000 clients of a state agency on a third-party website, a spokeswoman for the agency said. There's no evidence that the information was used for identity theft, said DHR spokeswoman Nancy Lineman, but DHR, which provides benefits such as food stamps and other aid, will offer affected clients a year of credit monitoring.
NEWS
July 26, 2010
The impoverished face enough challenges without the government adding identity theft to their woes. But officials at Maryland's Department of Human Resources are dealing with just that prospect after recently learning that an employee caused nearly 3,000 names with corresponding Social Security numbers to be placed on an Internet site. That the DHR even learned that such a breach of protocol took place was only due to the efforts of the nonprofit Liberty Coalition, which works to maintain online privacy.
NEWS
By Brenda Donald | July 22, 2010
At the beginning of the O'Malley-Brown administration, Maryland had far too many children in foster care, too many foster children in group homes and too few foster parents. The law virtually required the Department of Human Resources to license any new group home meeting minimum standards, despite the fact that most of the state was already oversaturated with group homes. Our procedures for processing applications for social service programs were outdated and inefficient. It had been more than 20 years since the law was changed to update the amount of child support a parent had to pay. We knew our reforms would require a steady commitment, patience, tenacity and a willingness to challenge the status quo. We faced budget cuts, staff shortages and a skeptical group of advocates — most of whom were unconvinced that a historically troubled and underfunded agency could make real progress.
NEWS
October 17, 2013
I am writing in response to the recent commentary regarding foster care, "How Maryland robs its most vulnerable children," (Oct. 14). The author incorrectly asserts that the Department of Human Resources is improperly taking assets from children in its care. The truth is that Maryland is among at least 39 states that routinely apply for Social Security benefits on behalf of the children in its custody and use those benefits to partially cover the cost of their care. Every dime goes to helping that child.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2011
Federal officials won't reimburse Maryland's Department of Human Resources for nearly $10 million in foster care-related expenses that the state had expected to recoup, according to a legislative audit released Wednesday. The funds would have paid Maryland for in-home, "pre-placement" services, provided to children with the aim of preventing them from being removed to foster care placement. The U.S Department of Health and Human Services denied the claim because DHR did not have a process to document that the children it served were in imminent risk of entering foster care, the auditors stated in the report.
NEWS
July 26, 2010
The impoverished face enough challenges without the government adding identity theft to their woes. But officials at Maryland's Department of Human Resources are dealing with just that prospect after recently learning that an employee caused nearly 3,000 names with corresponding Social Security numbers to be placed on an Internet site. That the DHR even learned that such a breach of protocol took place was only due to the efforts of the nonprofit Liberty Coalition, which works to maintain online privacy.
NEWS
By Brent Jones, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2010
When Brian Wilbon becomes interim secretary of the Department of Human Resources today, the former accountant will have a good idea of what he'll need to accomplish to get the temporary tag removed from his title. Just how much time he will have to do it remains the question. Wilbon, 40, will replace Brenda Donald, who left the position last week and begins working for the Annie E. Casey Foundation in August. Success, Wilbon said, lies in expanding the strategies put in place by his predecessor, singling out the progress the department has made in reducing the number of children in foster care and group homes.
NEWS
July 26, 2010
People who are wary of identity theft and protective of their personal information will find the actions of a state worker at the Maryland Department of Human Resources unsettling. The Social Security numbers of almost 3,000 Maryland residents who filed for assistance at the DHR were posted on the Internet for several months before it was discovered ("DHR fires worker who posted Social Security numbers on the Internet," July 23). Government agencies need to impose stricter policies and tougher regulations against employees violating the confidentiality of the people.
NEWS
By Brent Jones, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2010
When Brian Wilbon becomes interim secretary of the Department of Human Resources today, the former accountant will have a good idea of what he'll need to accomplish to get the temporary tag removed from his title. Just how much time he will have to do it remains the question. Wilbon, 40, will replace Brenda Donald, who left the position last week and begins working for the Annie E. Casey Foundation in August. Success, Wilbon said, lies in expanding the strategies put in place by his predecessor, singling out the progress the department has made in reducing the number of children in foster care and group homes.
NEWS
By Brent Jones, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2010
Maryland Department of Human Resources Secretary Brenda Donald will step down from her position next month to accept a job with the Annie E. Casey Foundation, a move the former Casey fellow said feels like going home. Donald spent more than three years as DHR secretary, focusing on decreasing the number of children living in group homes and finding work for people receiving welfare and child support payments. Donald will become the vice president of the Center for Effective Family Services and Systems, where she will formulate policies for disadvantaged children on a national level.
NEWS
January 11, 2014
Fifty years ago this week, in his State of the Union address to the nation, President Lyndon B. Johnson announced a new "War on Poverty. " The legislation he proposed and was ultimately passed by Congress made reducing poverty a national priority. As a result, there are far fewer Americans living in poverty today than in 1964. Some of the key safety net programs the Maryland Department of Human Resources administers today were created as part of that war, including SNAP (food stamps)
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2010
A state employee who posted the Social Security numbers of nearly 3,000 Maryland residents online for weeks has been fired, according to the Maryland Department of Human Resources. "As of today, the employee is no longer employed with the state," said Nancy Lineman, DHR spokeswoman. She declined to comment further about the employee, stating that this was a personnel matter. "We are still not sure why he used the data in an unauthorized way," Lineman said. Lineman said that the DHR is still investigating this incident and that no decision has been made about the filing of criminal charges.
NEWS
By Brenda Donald | July 22, 2010
At the beginning of the O'Malley-Brown administration, Maryland had far too many children in foster care, too many foster children in group homes and too few foster parents. The law virtually required the Department of Human Resources to license any new group home meeting minimum standards, despite the fact that most of the state was already oversaturated with group homes. Our procedures for processing applications for social service programs were outdated and inefficient. It had been more than 20 years since the law was changed to update the amount of child support a parent had to pay. We knew our reforms would require a steady commitment, patience, tenacity and a willingness to challenge the status quo. We faced budget cuts, staff shortages and a skeptical group of advocates — most of whom were unconvinced that a historically troubled and underfunded agency could make real progress.
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