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By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2005
Two pieces of news yesterday about the health benefits of DHA may benefit Martek Biosciences Corp., a Columbia company whose production of the omega-3 fatty acid has been a major force in the market for baby formula. A small-scale study, funded by the National Institutes of Health and released yesterday, showed that DHA could help prevent children with high cholesterol from developing heart disease. Meanwhile, new dietary guidelines from the U.S. Department of Agriculture also released yesterday claimed that DHA, which is found in shellfish and fish, may also help prevent cardiovascular disease.
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BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | January 9, 2011
It's nice — but rare — when shares of both companies rise on the announcement of a corporate takeover. Last month, DSM NV said it would buy Columbia-based Martek Biosciences for $1.1 billion in cash. Not only did Martek stock pop by more than 30 percent, reflecting the premium that Netherlands-based DSM agreed to pay over the shares' pre-announcement price; DSM rose by 4 percent, suggesting that its shareholders see the deal as sensible business and not a quixotic power grab by DSM boss Feike Sijbesma.
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BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2002
Martek Biosciences Corp., known for its algae-derived supplement for baby formula, said yesterday that it plans to pay up to $90 million in stock for a Colorado company that markets the same nutrient for use in foods and drinks consumed by adults. The Columbia company said the acquisition of privately held OmegaTech Inc. will ready it for a future in which the supplement, DHA, could be a standard added nutrient in everything from cheese to nutrition bars. The naturally occurring nutrient has been shown to aid infant eye and brain development, while an increasing number of studies by the National Institutes of Health, Martek and others show it also may boost the health of adults.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,sun reporter | October 18, 2006
Martek Biosciences can claim that its nutritional supplement helps develop infant minds and eyes, makes breast cancer treatments more tolerable and might prevent cardiovascular disease in adults. What the Columbia company hasn't quite nailed down is a correlation between its DHA - a vegetarian version of an omega-3 fatty acid typically found in fish - and slowed progression of Alzheimer's disease, despite animal studies showing a possible relationship. But yesterday, an arm of the National Institutes of Health announced that it will use Martek's DHA in a $10.5 million, 400- patient study into whether DHA can help slow Alzheimer's.
BUSINESS
By TRICIA BISHOP and TRICIA BISHOP,SUN REPORTER | March 31, 2006
On a morning news show broadcast across the country yesterday, Dr. Julian E. Bailes told the story of how a West Virginia miner's life was saved. And no one was more interested in his choice of words than the staff at Columbia's Martek Biosciences. Employees gathered before the television, tuned into CNN's American Morning, and hoped that three little letters would again spill from Bailes' lips. They didn't have to wait long. "We began [treating him with] DHA, which is an essential fatty acid to rebuild the myelin, the white [brain]
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2005
Shares of Martek Biosciences Corp. rose nearly 13 percent yesterday after news that the Kellogg Co. plans to fortify food with one of the Columbia biotech's products as early as next year. Martek announced the deal yesterday morning, but only described the partner as a Fortune 500 consumer-product food company. Kellogg, the Battle Creek, Mich., company that is the nation's top breakfast cereal manufacturer, was revealed as the company in a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission.
BUSINESS
By STACEY HIRSH and STACEY HIRSH,SUN REPORTER | June 17, 2006
Shares of Martek Biosciences Corp. jumped as much as 14 percent yesterday after the Columbia biotech company said it landed a deal for its nutritional supplements to be used by General Mills. The cereal giant is expected to launch a food item using Martek's product next year, Martek said in a news release. Martek manufactures DHA, an omega-3 fatty acid found in fish and some plants. Its product, which is derived from algae, is in more than two-thirds of the world's baby formula. Martek announced a similar deal last year with Kellogg Co., the country's No. 1 cereal maker.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1997
General Nutrition Center, the nation's largest mass marketer of vitamins and other nutritional supplements, has agreed to begin selling Neuromins, a nutritional supplement made with an oil developed by Columbia-based Martek Biosciences Corp.The oil contains DHA, a key fatty acid needed for brain function and development.General Nutrition said it will stock Neuromins sold by Nature's Way, one of the leading vitamin and supplement marketers.Martek, which lost $8.9 million on $4 million in revenue last year, is hopeful the move will boost revenue.
FEATURES
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,Contributing WriterUnited Feature Syndicate | March 16, 1993
Nobody can exercise vigorously every day. If you think you can, expect to be injured. All athletic training is done by stressing and recovering. It's called the hard-easy principle. On one day, you exercise vigorously and your muscles feel sore. Then, for the next few workouts you exercise far less intensely until the soreness disappears. Only then should you attempt another hard workout.There are three different ways to use the hard-easy principle. Athletes in competitive sports have to train specifically in their sports, so a basketball player may scrimmage for four hours on one day and then shoot baskets and run plays on the next.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | January 9, 2011
It's nice — but rare — when shares of both companies rise on the announcement of a corporate takeover. Last month, DSM NV said it would buy Columbia-based Martek Biosciences for $1.1 billion in cash. Not only did Martek stock pop by more than 30 percent, reflecting the premium that Netherlands-based DSM agreed to pay over the shares' pre-announcement price; DSM rose by 4 percent, suggesting that its shareholders see the deal as sensible business and not a quixotic power grab by DSM boss Feike Sijbesma.
BUSINESS
By STACEY HIRSH and STACEY HIRSH,SUN REPORTER | June 17, 2006
Shares of Martek Biosciences Corp. jumped as much as 14 percent yesterday after the Columbia biotech company said it landed a deal for its nutritional supplements to be used by General Mills. The cereal giant is expected to launch a food item using Martek's product next year, Martek said in a news release. Martek manufactures DHA, an omega-3 fatty acid found in fish and some plants. Its product, which is derived from algae, is in more than two-thirds of the world's baby formula. Martek announced a similar deal last year with Kellogg Co., the country's No. 1 cereal maker.
BUSINESS
By TRICIA BISHOP and TRICIA BISHOP,SUN REPORTER | March 31, 2006
On a morning news show broadcast across the country yesterday, Dr. Julian E. Bailes told the story of how a West Virginia miner's life was saved. And no one was more interested in his choice of words than the staff at Columbia's Martek Biosciences. Employees gathered before the television, tuned into CNN's American Morning, and hoped that three little letters would again spill from Bailes' lips. They didn't have to wait long. "We began [treating him with] DHA, which is an essential fatty acid to rebuild the myelin, the white [brain]
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2005
Shares of Martek Biosciences Corp. rose nearly 13 percent yesterday after news that the Kellogg Co. plans to fortify food with one of the Columbia biotech's products as early as next year. Martek announced the deal yesterday morning, but only described the partner as a Fortune 500 consumer-product food company. Kellogg, the Battle Creek, Mich., company that is the nation's top breakfast cereal manufacturer, was revealed as the company in a filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2005
Two pieces of news yesterday about the health benefits of DHA may benefit Martek Biosciences Corp., a Columbia company whose production of the omega-3 fatty acid has been a major force in the market for baby formula. A small-scale study, funded by the National Institutes of Health and released yesterday, showed that DHA could help prevent children with high cholesterol from developing heart disease. Meanwhile, new dietary guidelines from the U.S. Department of Agriculture also released yesterday claimed that DHA, which is found in shellfish and fish, may also help prevent cardiovascular disease.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2002
Martek Biosciences Corp., known for its algae-derived supplement for baby formula, said yesterday that it plans to pay up to $90 million in stock for a Colorado company that markets the same nutrient for use in foods and drinks consumed by adults. The Columbia company said the acquisition of privately held OmegaTech Inc. will ready it for a future in which the supplement, DHA, could be a standard added nutrient in everything from cheese to nutrition bars. The naturally occurring nutrient has been shown to aid infant eye and brain development, while an increasing number of studies by the National Institutes of Health, Martek and others show it also may boost the health of adults.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | January 7, 1998
Shares in Martek Biosciences Inc. jumped more than 10 percent yesterday on news that a study published in a leading medical journal suggests that babies who are breast-fed perform better in school, score higher on standardized math and reading tests, and are more likely to graduate from high school.One of the Columbia-based company's key products, docosahexaenoic acid, or DHA oil, contains a key fatty acid found in breast milk. Martek's product is derived from micro-algae.The study, said Alex Zisson, a biotechnology analyst with Hambrecht & Quist, "is one more arrow in the quiver for those who believe DHA should be included in infant formulas."
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Staff Writer | February 14, 1992
Give $50 to Henry "Pete" Linsert Jr. and he will make your baby smarter.Sound like the pitch of a snake oil salesman? Some people think so.But if it's not, and Mr. Linsert is right, the eager 50-year-old former venture capitalist could be the chairman of a very big company some day.Mr. Linsert, president of a Columbia biotechnology company, Martek Corp., is promoting an ingredient -- Docosahexaenoic acid, or DHA -- that he thinks can make a difference in a child's intelligence when added to infant formula.
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Staff Writer | February 14, 1992
Give $50 to Henry "Pete" Linsert Jr. and he will make your baby smarter.Sound like the pitch of a snake oil salesman? Some people think so.But if it's not, and Mr. Linsert is right, the eager 50-year-old former venture capitalist could be the chairman of a very big company some day.Mr. Linsert, president of a Columbia biotechnology company, Martek Corp., is promoting an ingredient -- Docosahexaenoic acid, or DHA -- that he thinks can make a difference in a child's intelligence when added to infant formula.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1997
General Nutrition Center, the nation's largest mass marketer of vitamins and other nutritional supplements, has agreed to begin selling Neuromins, a nutritional supplement made with an oil developed by Columbia-based Martek Biosciences Corp.The oil contains DHA, a key fatty acid needed for brain function and development.General Nutrition said it will stock Neuromins sold by Nature's Way, one of the leading vitamin and supplement marketers.Martek, which lost $8.9 million on $4 million in revenue last year, is hopeful the move will boost revenue.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | May 26, 1997
Dr. David Kyle wasn't surprised when a British research study published earlier this month concluded that infants deprived of breast milk may be at higher risk for developing schizophrenia later in life.As one of the developers of a nutritional oil derived from micro algae, the Martek Biosciences Corp. researcher has long followed the growing body of scientific evidence that a certain fatty acid found in breast milk plays a critical role in the visual and neurological development of children.
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