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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 11, 2002
Del. Thomas E. Dewberry, a Catonsville Democrat and speaker pro tem of the House of Delegates, was named chief administrative law judge yesterday by Gov. Parris N. Glendening. The move had been expected since the end of the legislative session last month, and it continues the exodus of experienced legislators from the Baltimore County delegation. In his new job, Dewberry, 51, will oversee the Office of Administrative Hearings, which hears cases from citizens and businesses with complaints about the actions of state agencies.
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NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Jennifer Skalka,Sun reporter | March 31, 2007
Charles R. Boutin, the beleaguered Public Service Commission member who resigned last month, has been tapped to be an administrative law judge with the Office of Administrative Hearings. Boutin, a Republican member of the House of Delegates between 1999 and 2005, starts work April 4, according to J. Bernard McClellan, an administrative law judge and the organization's deputy director for quality assurance. McClellan said that Boutin was selected by Chief Administrative Law Judge Thomas E. Dewberry, a former colleague of Boutin's in the House.
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BUSINESS
By Rebecca Rodriguez and Rebecca Rodriguez,FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM | June 16, 2002
TYLER, Texas - From the aged bricks on the pathway to the sturdy cypress columns peeking through a canopy of 150-year-old trees, a visit to Dewberry is a walk through history. The plantation home south of Tyler was built in 1852 by Col. John Dewberry, a Georgia native who moved to Smith County in 1835. The property passed to the Edwards family of Kansas in 1908. Ninety years later, Tyler attorney Andy Bergfeld bought the property and has spent the past several years researching and restoring the home, which is on the National Register of Historic Places.
NEWS
December 9, 2004
Howard County Executive James N. Robey has named 10 people to serve on the new Friends of the Western Regional Park Committee. The committee, which will hold its first meeting at 7 p.m. today in the media center at Bushy Park Elementary School, was formed to encourage neighborhood involvement and facilitate communication about plans for the park. The public is invited to attend. Committee members are Joan M. Becker of Woodbine; Mark Carter of Glenwood; Clifton Clevenger of Glenwood; Don Croce of West Friendship; Rob Dewberry of Mount Airy; Jack Milani of Glenwood; Michael Shapiro of Woodbine; David Skeberdis of Cooksville; Pam Smith of Woodbine; and Karen Wynne of Woodbine.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | June 4, 1996
THOMAS E. DEWBERRY, who has represented Baltimore County in the House of Delegates since 1989, gets to try on the mantle of senior House leadership.House Speaker Casper R. Taylor Jr. tapped Dewberry as speaker pro tem last night after a daylong meeting with House leaders.Technically, Dewberry, 45, a lawyer who is a senior hearing examiner for the Public Service Commission, still must be elected to the post by the full House when it meets in January. But his "nomination" by Taylor is tantamount to an appointment.
NEWS
August 12, 1994
The House of Delegates primary races for district 47B in southwest Baltimore County feature a not-so-grand total of three candidates.On the Democratic side, first-term incumbent Thomas E. Dewberry of Catonsville has just one challenger, Woodlawn tavern owner John K. "Jack" Milani. Only one Republican, food service specialist Steve Cumby of Catonsville, has filed. He will run unopposed in the primary and represent the GOP in the November election.Mr. Milani is an owner of Monaghan's Pub in Woodlawn and an official of Baltimore County's Licensed Beverage Association.
NEWS
April 15, 1995
A photo caption on the front page of The Sun yesterday incorrectly stated the name of Rob Dewberry, head of the Baltimore County Narcotics Unit.The Sun regrets the error.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2001
A bill that would expand the number of hospitals in Maryland that can perform open heart surgery, pronounced dead late Friday, remained on life support last night after coming back from the legislative graveyard on Saturday. The legislation, which is being fought tenaciously by hospitals that already have open-heart programs, was killed on a 15-5 vote in the House Environmental Matters Committee on Friday. On Saturday, a report was distributed on the House floor listing the legislation under those receiving an unfavorable report - the legislative equivalent of an obituary.
NEWS
October 28, 1994
Legislative District 12 is among the more dichotomous creations of the state officials who a few years ago redrew Maryland's political boundaries. Roughly half of the new 12th is in conservative southwest Baltimore County; the rest lies in more liberal east Howard County.Perhaps fittingly, the District 12 state Senate race features a clear choice between conservative Republican David P. Maier of Elkridge, a construction contractor, and liberal Democrat Edward Kasemeyer of Columbia, a lobbyist for the Montgomery County government.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,Sun Staff Writer | May 7, 1994
Baltimore County police completed four days of drug seizures and arrests yesterday, seizing cocaine, other drugs, guns, cars and cash from an Eastside operation estimated to be importing 16 pounds to 18 pounds of cocaine a month.Six people were arrested and charged with distribution of cocaine."It should make an impact on the availability over there," said Lt. Rob Dewberry, commander of the narcotics unit. "What we did here was attack the upper echelon and take the drugs off the streets . . . the executive board of the organization, so to speak."
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Sarah Koenig and Michael Dresser and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2003
HAPPINESS IS being a former Maryland lawmaker appointed to a high-ranking state job: You get a wonderful "funeral," but you don't have to die. Former Sens. Perry Sfikas and Michael J. Collins and Del. Thomas E. Dewberry were eulogized to their faces last week as they appeared before the Senate Executive Nominations Committee for confirmation to the plum jobs given them by Gov. Parris N. Glendening last year. The nominations of the three Democrats were put on a fast track so that they could be confirmed before Gov.-elect Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s inauguration tomorrow.
BUSINESS
By Rebecca Rodriguez and Rebecca Rodriguez,FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM | June 16, 2002
TYLER, Texas - From the aged bricks on the pathway to the sturdy cypress columns peeking through a canopy of 150-year-old trees, a visit to Dewberry is a walk through history. The plantation home south of Tyler was built in 1852 by Col. John Dewberry, a Georgia native who moved to Smith County in 1835. The property passed to the Edwards family of Kansas in 1908. Ninety years later, Tyler attorney Andy Bergfeld bought the property and has spent the past several years researching and restoring the home, which is on the National Register of Historic Places.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 15, 2002
Gov. Parris N. Glendening appointed three people yesterday to fill vacancies in the Baltimore County legislative delegation. John R. Schneider of Perry Hall will replace Thomas L. Bromwell as state senator in the 8th District. Schneider, a Democrat, is a longtime friend and aide to Bromwell. He retired from AlliedSignal in 1995 and has been heavily involved in recreational council activities. Dana M. Stein, chairman of the county's Democratic State Central Committee, will replace Michael J. Finifter as a delegate in the 11th District.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 11, 2002
Del. Thomas E. Dewberry, a Catonsville Democrat and speaker pro tem of the House of Delegates, was named chief administrative law judge yesterday by Gov. Parris N. Glendening. The move had been expected since the end of the legislative session last month, and it continues the exodus of experienced legislators from the Baltimore County delegation. In his new job, Dewberry, 51, will oversee the Office of Administrative Hearings, which hears cases from citizens and businesses with complaints about the actions of state agencies.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | January 25, 2002
WHATEVER happened to civility, right? You want civility, you should sit at home, put doilies on the table and have high tea with your American Girl dolls. I don't think you can expect a lot of civility when you dress up in Ravens purple and go to Heinz Field in Pittsburgh during a National Football League playoff game. You're not asking for civility. You're asking for trouble. But that's me. I guess Tom Dewberry, a state delegate from Baltimore County and the speaker pro tem of the Maryland House of Delegates, has higher expectations for society, and to his credit.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | July 11, 2001
I WAS DAYDREAMING about dessert, scanning Web sites looking for provocative photos of raspberries and strawberries, when I saw a mention of a berry that I had never heard of: the dewberry. Not only was this berry edible, it was also local. It grew right here in Maryland; an encyclopedia said so. "The Western shore of Maryland," declared an online version of the World Book, "has many kinds of berries, including blackberries, dewberries, raspberries and wild strawberries." Dewberries? Say what?
NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Jennifer Skalka,Sun reporter | March 31, 2007
Charles R. Boutin, the beleaguered Public Service Commission member who resigned last month, has been tapped to be an administrative law judge with the Office of Administrative Hearings. Boutin, a Republican member of the House of Delegates between 1999 and 2005, starts work April 4, according to J. Bernard McClellan, an administrative law judge and the organization's deputy director for quality assurance. McClellan said that Boutin was selected by Chief Administrative Law Judge Thomas E. Dewberry, a former colleague of Boutin's in the House.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,Sun Staff Writer | August 29, 1994
Both Democratic candidates for the House of Delegates seat in District 47B are making the same promises: tougher crime laws, improved schools and putting priorities on state government spending.First-term Del. Thomas E. Dewberry of Catonsville and challenger John K. "Jack" Milani of Woodlawn are running similar no-frills campaigns of old-fashioned door-knocking, handshaking and posting roadside signs. The two, both Baltimore County natives, even have raised about the same amount of money -- nearly $30,000.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2001
A bill that would expand the number of hospitals in Maryland that can perform open heart surgery, pronounced dead late Friday, remained on life support last night after coming back from the legislative graveyard on Saturday. The legislation, which is being fought tenaciously by hospitals that already have open-heart programs, was killed on a 15-5 vote in the House Environmental Matters Committee on Friday. On Saturday, a report was distributed on the House floor listing the legislation under those receiving an unfavorable report - the legislative equivalent of an obituary.
SPORTS
By Andy Knobel and Andy Knobel,SUN STAFF | December 3, 2000
Notre Dame Stadium usher Victor Couch, 86, gives new meaning to the term "longtime employee." Couch was first hired by Knute Rockne at the age of 12 to be an usher at football games in 1926 at Cartier Field. Yes, Knute Rockne. When Notre Dame Stadium was built in 1930, the powers-that-be determined that Couch was not old enough. He was put on the wait list. For 11 years. Finally, in 1941, Couch was hired as a stadium usher. He has been on staff since then and has more than made up for lost time.
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