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Devolution

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By KALMAN R. HETTLEMAN | December 29, 1994
The $100 million federal empowerment-zone grant awarded to Baltimore will bring vast economic, social and psychological benefits. But it marks the end, not the beginning, of a period of large-scale aid from Washington. In fact, impoverished cities like Baltimore will be devastated by the Gingrich devolution.Proposals to devolve federal responsibility for welfare and social services to the states do not sound alarms, as do orphanages for the poor and tax breaks for the rich, but they pose a greater danger to urban American than any other goal of the new Republican majority.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | May 6, 2001
As the May 16 execution of Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh approaches and the debate over a closed-circuit telecast of the event grows, one thing seems dead certain: Soon, we are all going to get the chance to see executions on our television screens -- perhaps very soon. We are on the slick and fast part of a downward slippery slope in our cultural history. Night after night, prime-time entertainment television speaks to some of our worst impulses, while new communication technology offers ever more ways to capture and disseminate stupefying images that pander to those impulses.
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NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | February 13, 1995
Bronx, New York. -- The Republican Congress, governors and mayors, even the Clinton administration have been focusing this winter on ''devolution'' -- passing authority down from the federal government to states.Neal R. Peirce writes a column on state and urban affairs.
NEWS
August 14, 1999
THE STATE board of education in Kansas jeopardized the future of that state's children by censoring what they learn about the past. This will curtail their education and harm their opportunities as adults.If allowed to stand, the new curriculum would discourage parents of young children from moving to Kansas. The board could not have created a worse impediment to economic development.The board hired a panel of scientists to draw up a state curriculum required of all local schools. Three board members then rewrote the recommendation to banish evolution from the requirement, inhibiting the study of biology and harming that of geology.
NEWS
May 2, 1999
THE FIRST Scottish parliament in three centuries and first Welsh assembly in seven will be elected Thursday. This is part of the British Labor government's plan for "devolution," which restores elected regional government for Greater London and Northern Ireland, introducing it in Scotland and Wales. Devolution is also meant to solve such problems as periodic outbreaks of Celtic nationalism.All are different. Scotland was a kingdom, united to England in fact in 1603 and in law in 1707. Welsh is a language and culture seeking a country.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | January 7, 1994
The Mayan devolution retreated to the mountains. Th Mexican army, like the U.S. army, does deserts not mountains.No authority knows how to stop campus dissidents from stealing student newspapers. Maybe if they were sentenced to write essays demonstrating they had read them?
NEWS
By MONA CHAREN | September 11, 1995
Washington. -- Is devolution enough? Some Republican conservatives are doubtful. Thus begins one of the truly interesting philosophical debates we are likely to see this year in Washington -- and like all the significant debates, it is taking place not between liberals and conservatives but among conservatives.Devolution, returning power and resources to states and localities, symbolized by the block grant, was the rallying cry of the first months of the Republican Congress. For some Republicans, turning authority over to the states was seen as an end in itself.
NEWS
By Neal R. Peirce | February 10, 1997
"AN ANTIDOTE for anecdote'' is former Attorney General Dick Thornburgh's description of the $30 million ''Assessing the New Federalism'' project just launched by the Urban Institute.The idea is to track over several years the effects on children and families as the federal government hands off massive social responsibilities to the states.Programs like welfare, Medicaid and job training typically get bogged down in selective story-telling and ideological debate. Mr. Thornburgh, who co-chairs an advisory panel for the Urban Institute's research program, witnessed the rhetorical wars first-hand in two terms as governor of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | March 28, 1995
Washington -- ACCEPTED: THAT "gays in the military" has now passed beyond any notion of fairness for homosexuals and has entered our common speech as a paradigm for a president's ideological stupidity.Accepted: that the "New Republicans" in Congress genuinely care about culture, education, civic life and the devolution of power to the people.Suggested: that the Republicans now have their "gays in the military" problem, and it is public television!Why would I say something so outrageous? Because everything the Republicans say they stand for they are helping to throw away in this shortsighted, spiteful and stupid ideological stand.
NEWS
By RUSSELL WARREN HOWE | January 23, 1994
The explosion of the former Soviet Union into 16 republics, with more on the way -- some probably from within the great Russian Federation itself -- has encouraged the division of the former Yugoslavia into five of its earlier, Austro-Hungarian Empire parts, and the five seem likely to become seven or more.The former British Somaliland has announced its secession from the formerly Italian southern portion of Somalia. If Kibris (Turkish-speaking northern Cyprus) is anything to go by, this secession is unlikely to be reversed.
NEWS
May 2, 1999
THE FIRST Scottish parliament in three centuries and first Welsh assembly in seven will be elected Thursday. This is part of the British Labor government's plan for "devolution," which restores elected regional government for Greater London and Northern Ireland, introducing it in Scotland and Wales. Devolution is also meant to solve such problems as periodic outbreaks of Celtic nationalism.All are different. Scotland was a kingdom, united to England in fact in 1603 and in law in 1707. Welsh is a language and culture seeking a country.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and Thomas W. Waldron and C. Fraser Smith and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | April 12, 1998
These are the billion-dollar days at the Maryland General Assembly.As important bills get their final fine-tuning in the last moments of this year's legislative session, big money rides on every word change -- with much of the work done by small clusters of legislators in so-called conference committees.Some of this shaping and reshaping can translate to millions -- even billions -- of dollars for utilities, teachers, the tobacco industry, the state and a host of other competing interests.
NEWS
By Neal R. Peirce | February 10, 1997
"AN ANTIDOTE for anecdote'' is former Attorney General Dick Thornburgh's description of the $30 million ''Assessing the New Federalism'' project just launched by the Urban Institute.The idea is to track over several years the effects on children and families as the federal government hands off massive social responsibilities to the states.Programs like welfare, Medicaid and job training typically get bogged down in selective story-telling and ideological debate. Mr. Thornburgh, who co-chairs an advisory panel for the Urban Institute's research program, witnessed the rhetorical wars first-hand in two terms as governor of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
December 2, 1995
SOME LEADFOOTS may view President Clinton's signing of a bill to eliminate all federal speed limits as a victory over Big Brother government, but many others are simply left wondering what to make of the litany of public safety advice and findings they have absorbed and believed during the past generation.What happened to "55 saves lives"? Or statistics showing the immense medical costs of unhelmeted motorcyclists who receive head injuries in accidents? Or the thousands of lives said to be saved by the lower speed limits and mandated safety devices?
NEWS
By MONA CHAREN | September 11, 1995
Washington. -- Is devolution enough? Some Republican conservatives are doubtful. Thus begins one of the truly interesting philosophical debates we are likely to see this year in Washington -- and like all the significant debates, it is taking place not between liberals and conservatives but among conservatives.Devolution, returning power and resources to states and localities, symbolized by the block grant, was the rallying cry of the first months of the Republican Congress. For some Republicans, turning authority over to the states was seen as an end in itself.
NEWS
By Daniel Patrick Moynihan | August 8, 1995
A CONSIDERABLE debate has commenced in the Senate, but it is not, as commonly portrayed, about welfare.The subject, rather, is the devolution -- "causing to descend" -- of social welfare programs from the federal government to the states. This takes the form of block grants. It may well prove the next stage in the long, alternating history of federalism.At issue is the political economy of the New Deal, or at least a goodly portion of it. As a matter of policy, the New Deal brought about a great shift in resources from the North to the South and West.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and Thomas W. Waldron and C. Fraser Smith and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | April 12, 1998
These are the billion-dollar days at the Maryland General Assembly.As important bills get their final fine-tuning in the last moments of this year's legislative session, big money rides on every word change -- with much of the work done by small clusters of legislators in so-called conference committees.Some of this shaping and reshaping can translate to millions -- even billions -- of dollars for utilities, teachers, the tobacco industry, the state and a host of other competing interests.
NEWS
By BARRY RASCOVAR | April 30, 1995
The counties had better get used to it: ''Devolution'' is headed their way.From Washington to Annapolis to localities. That's how the downsizing of American government works. Washington takes welfare and Medicaid and hands them off to the states. The states, in turn, send along a big chunk of the programs to the cities and counties.It's already started. Welfare reform likely to pass Congress will return control of this program to the states. But the amount of federal money will no longer be unlimited.
NEWS
By BARRY RASCOVAR | April 30, 1995
The counties had better get used to it: ''Devolution'' is headed their way.From Washington to Annapolis to localities. That's how the downsizing of American government works. Washington takes welfare and Medicaid and hands them off to the states. The states, in turn, send along a big chunk of the programs to the cities and counties.It's already started. Welfare reform likely to pass Congress will return control of this program to the states. But the amount of federal money will no longer be unlimited.
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | March 28, 1995
Washington -- ACCEPTED: THAT "gays in the military" has now passed beyond any notion of fairness for homosexuals and has entered our common speech as a paradigm for a president's ideological stupidity.Accepted: that the "New Republicans" in Congress genuinely care about culture, education, civic life and the devolution of power to the people.Suggested: that the Republicans now have their "gays in the military" problem, and it is public television!Why would I say something so outrageous? Because everything the Republicans say they stand for they are helping to throw away in this shortsighted, spiteful and stupid ideological stand.
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