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By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
Kamel Mahadin visited Baltimore 30 years ago as a graduate student studying landscape architecture at Louisiana State University. He returned Wednesday as the head of an ambitious, multibillion-dollar effort to build out Jordan's lone waterfront city into a tourist hub and expanded port. "Thirty years ago, when I visited … this was a slum area," said Mahadin, chief commissioner of the Aqaba Special Economic Zone Authority. "Why Baltimore? It's a waterfront development. … We want to see success story.
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NEWS
By Richard Eberhart Hall | June 25, 2014
Jacques Kelly 's recent column ("Movement to open more corner stores in Remington," June 21), could serve as testimony for why the Baltimore City Council should not eliminate corner stores in the city zoning code. Healthy, vibrant communities need a mix of land uses that fit their scale and other characteristics. The corner store, a community fixture of the past, can fill a need throughout Baltimore and elsewhere. As we've learned over and over again, older, organic development patterns are often preferable to those driven by auto-dependent design.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2014
Roland Brown likes to remember old Leadenhall Street and the people who lived there when he was a child: the Harts, Miss Mary, Emma Jane. They're gone now — dead or moved away, many of them forced out decades ago to make way for a never-realized highway. Brown, 82, now lives on Montgomery Street in the house where his grandfather founded a funeral home in 1909. His front steps face south into Sharp-Leadenhall, a historically African-American community between Federal Hill and M&T Bank Stadium, where tidy alleyway rowhouses give way to empty warehouses, cracked sidewalks and grassy vacant lots.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
Developers are set to receive tax credits designed to spur the construction of new apartments and homes in Baltimore under legislation the City Council approved Monday. The tax credits, which received no opposition from the council, are part of a plan by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake to keep families in Baltimore and attract new residents to the city. "We look at different trends in the market that help us to determine what credits might put the city in the best position to be competitive," said Kevin R. Harris, a spokesman for Rawlings-Blake.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2014
It's hard to see a benefit in a high-profile redevelopment project being delayed four years, but Caroline Moore has found one. Moore, the lead developer for the 28-acre State Center project, said the setback caused by a lawsuit - which was dismissed this spring - has created a chance to incorporate the latest environmental techniques into the designs. The project could introduce Baltimore's first "ecodistrict," creating a zone with a set of common environmental goals and infrastructure systems to help meet the targets.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2014
Baltimore County is adding additional police officers and improving nighttime lighting as part of a public safety focus for new developments in Towson, including next month's opening of a 15-screen movie theater. With multiple projects sprouting in the county seat, County Executive Kevin Kamenetz said Friday that public safety is the priority. He sought to assure residents that the county can handle crowds expected to flock to downtown Towson for the new Cinemark theater and restaurants at Towson Square.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2014
A Baltimore judge ruled this week that she will not enforce her decision to dismiss a multimillion-dollar lawsuit filed by the former developers of the "Superblock" until an appellate court rules on the case. City officials expressed disappointment with the ruling, which they said could further slow development of the long-stalled project on Baltimore's west side. "It's always frustrating to me when the legal process is protracted and it prevents meaningful development in the city," Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2014
Open retail strife has broken out in White Marsh as the owners of the area's mall and other established retail centers foment opposition to a proposed upscale outlet mall along Interstate 95. Paragon Outlet Partners proposed building a 525,000-square-foot center with about 100 outlet stores, including brands such as Calvin Klein, Coach and Kate Spade, that would draw customers from across the region and off I-95. The Baltimore-based firm specializes in such malls, developing centers closer to population centers than outlets historically have located.
NEWS
June 14, 2014
The hard-fought campaign for the Democratic gubernatorial nomination this year has provided voters with a difficult decision. All three of the major candidates bring formidable and unique strengths to the contest, and none is without serious flaws. After watching the race closely, conducting extensive interviews with each candidate and considering their stands on the issues, we conclude that Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown is the best choice. We did not come to this endorsement easily. Douglas F. Gansler has proven himself an able public servant during his long career, first as Montgomery County state's attorney and now as attorney general.
NEWS
June 13, 2014
Your recent article did a good job of updating readers on the status of transit-oriented development in Maryland ( "After delays, transit-oriented development starts to arrive," June 6). The economic recovery and renewed interest in living in smart growth, mixed-use communities is prompting developers to build around transit from White Flint to Owings Mills. However, the article lacked an explanation of why Marylanders need transit oriented development. Building housing, offices and stores next to transit in already-built communities is a key strategy to curb sprawl, protect the environment, create vibrant communities and make the best use of public investments in infrastructure.
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