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SPORTS
By Jeff Ermann and Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
Editor's note: Each week,  InsideMDSports.com  provides this blog with a Maryland recruiting feature that previously appeared as premium content on its site. The past month was slow for hoops recruiting, thanks to the NCAA's limitation of early "open" periods. But with coaches allowed to hit the road again beginning last week, the pace in the class of 2015 has picked up considerably. Because of his growing interest in St. James point guard Justin Robinson , it seems Terps coach Mark Turgeon didn't press for a commitment from Kevin Dorsey . New offers Maryland handed out a couple of offers Tuesday to a pair of top-50 guards in Eric Davis and Prince Ali . It initially was thought that Mark Turgeon wouldn't pursue guards in 2015, but the transfers of Seth Allen and Roddy Peters, combined with transfer Terry Henderson's selection of North Carolina State, has him in the market for at least one and perhaps two in this recruiting class.
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BUSINESS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
The Baltimore City Council passed a bill Thursday backed by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake to make 10 years of tax credits available citywide for developers of apartments. The council amended the legislation to include developers who renovate apartments as well as those who build new structures. "Expansion of the current apartment tax credit program continues to move us in the right direction by encouraging investment that supports neighborhoods, promotes historic preservation and generates millions of additional dollars for the city," Rawlings-Blake said in a statement.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
Developer Patrick Turner is negotiating with a new group over his role in an ambitious mixed use development project he had planned for waterfront property in Westport. Citigroup Global Markets Realty Corp., which made a $30 million loan to Turner in 2007 to help finance the development, transferred ownership of the note July 2 to Westport Property Investments, LLC. Earlier this year, the bank moved to foreclose on the properties securing the loan, on which Turner owes more than $32 million.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
Retired former Ravens center Matt Birk is staying involved with the NFL. The six-time Pro Bowl center and former Walter Payton NFL Man of the Year was named the league's director of football development today. Birk spent this past year working as an appeals officer for the NFL and NFL Players Association after retiring in 2012 following the Ravens' Super Bowl XLVII victory over the San Francisco 49ers. Now the former Ravens and Minnesota Vikings offensive lineman will be involved in development of the game and administration of game-day operations.
NEWS
By Mike Gesker | July 9, 2014
Sharing the bounty of America's farms is a lifesaving tradition almost as old at the Republic itself. In 1812, President James Madison sent emergency aid to earthquake victims in Venezuela. President Herbert Hoover started a large feeding program in Russia during the 1920s. And after World War II, President Harry Truman launched the Marshall Plan, named for George C. Marshall, which delivered tons of food to the people of Western Europe. In times of emergency, the U.S. government and the American people respond vigorously and generously.
HEALTH
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2014
Around 3 billion people worldwide cook in their homes over fires fueled by everything from wood and eucalyptus leaves to dried cow dung and quinoa and every year, the World Health Organization estimates, 4 million people die because of the smoke. The problem is the smoke from many home cooking fires is not properly vented outside. The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health is working to develop a safer way to cook for more than half of the world's population. The project aims to decrease the amount of harmful smoke residents of rural communities can be exposed to using cookstoves in thatched huts with little ventilation.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2014
Eighty-eight-year-old Alfred Clasing Jr. and his wife, Marie, had hoped to spend their final years at a retirement community for veterans at Fort Howard, part of a scenic Baltimore County peninsula that juts into the Chesapeake Bay. But a developer's ambitious blueprint for the federally owned property fell through, contributing to a decade of inactivity at the site. Now, even as the government and another developer work on a project that would bring about 1,300 residential units for veterans and others to the 94-acre site, the Clasings doubt they will ever find a home there.
HEALTH
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2014
For those waiting on surgery to place a defibrillator inside their chest, special vests can deliver lifesaving shocks in the event of a heart arrhythmia. But the downside, some say, is that the vests are so uncomfortable some patients don't wear them all the time. A team of undergraduate Johns Hopkins University students, led by an alumnus inventor, set out to build a new prototype defibrillator vest that is more comfortable and works more effectively. The result — a vest that has won competitions and might be headed for approved medical use. "Each aspect of this had to not only function correctly but we had to think of it separately, like, how do we make it convenient and comfortable for the patient?"
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
Kamel Mahadin visited Baltimore 30 years ago as a graduate student studying landscape architecture at Louisiana State University. He returned Wednesday as the head of an ambitious, multibillion-dollar effort to build out Jordan's lone waterfront city into a tourist hub and expanded port. "Thirty years ago, when I visited … this was a slum area," said Mahadin, chief commissioner of the Aqaba Special Economic Zone Authority. "Why Baltimore? It's a waterfront development. … We want to see success story.
NEWS
By Richard Eberhart Hall | June 25, 2014
Jacques Kelly 's recent column ("Movement to open more corner stores in Remington," June 21), could serve as testimony for why the Baltimore City Council should not eliminate corner stores in the city zoning code. Healthy, vibrant communities need a mix of land uses that fit their scale and other characteristics. The corner store, a community fixture of the past, can fill a need throughout Baltimore and elsewhere. As we've learned over and over again, older, organic development patterns are often preferable to those driven by auto-dependent design.
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