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NEWS
August 8, 2014
Whatever the reason for Brenda McKenzie's decision to leave as head of the Baltimore Development Corporation after just two years, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake made a shrewd move by recruiting City Councilman William H. Cole IV to take her place. Ms. McKenzie never fully gelled with the downtown business community that has traditionally been the BDC's chief constituency, but Mr. Cole, who has represented the central business district for two terms on the council, has immediate credibility in that area.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
Researchers at the Johns Hopkins University and four other prominent institutions will spend the next five years trying to turn a theoretical "next-generation" form of encryption into a practical way to better protect software from hackers. Hopkins, the University of California, Los Angeles, Stanford University, the University of Texas and Columbia University are forming the Center for Encrypted Functionalities through a $5 million grant from the National Science Foundation. They are exploring a strategy known as obfuscation, which can hide the inner workings of programs from outsiders.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2014
WASHINGTON - When the Orioles were discussing trades last month with various teams, they fielded requests targeting their top four pitching prospects: right-handers Kevin Gausman, Dylan Bundy, Hunter Harvey and left-hander Eduardo Rodriguez, who they ultimately dealt Thursday to the Boston Red Sox for reliever Andrew Miller. But there was another wave of inquiries this summer, too. According to multiple sources, teams asked about the availability of several Orioles position prospects, including Triple-A Norfolk outfielder Dariel Alvarez and first baseman Christian Walker, Double-A Bowie outfielder Mike Yastrzemski and Low-A Delmarva catcher Chance Sisco.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | August 3, 2014
A few words about the "poor door. " Maybe you already know about this. Maybe you read on Slate, saw on Colbert or heard on NPR how a developer qualified for tax benefits under New York City's Inclusionary Housing Program by agreeing to add to its new luxury building on the Upper West Side set a number of "affordable" apartments. How the company won permission to build that building with two entrances, one in front for the exclusive use of upper-income residents, another, reportedly in the alley, for residents of more modest means.
NEWS
Jules Witcover | August 1, 2014
 For more than 60 years with hardly a break, the Republican Partyhas chosen as its standard-bearer someone who has been able to claim it's his turn. Not since military hero Dwight D. Eisenhower defeated Sen. Robert A. Taft of Ohio, whose supporters so contended in 1952, has a conspicuous outsider run away with the prize. Patience nearly always has been rewarded for party stalwarts, whether it was Richard Nixon in 1960, Barry Goldwater in 1964, Nixon again in 1968, Gerald Ford in 1976, Ronald Reagan in 1980, the senior George Bush in 1988, Bob Dole in 1996, the junior George Bushin 2000, John McCain in 2008 or Mitt Romney in 2012.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2014
Beatty Development Group said Thursday that it hopes to break ground early next year on its next building in Harbor Point — an 18-story complex with 285 apartments. The development firm, which is working with Henson Development Co. on the Point Street Apartments, outlined plans before the city's design review panel for the 290,000-square-foot building, which would be located on what is currently a parking lot just west of the historic Ferndale Fence & Awning building and behind Thames Street Wharf, where Morgan Stanley has its offices.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2014
Towson's brand-new movie palace comes with all the accouterments of modern filmgoing: 15 tiered auditoriums, floor-to-ceiling screens, leather seats, even a choice of wines. But the Cinemark theater, which opened July 10, also offers guests an unexpected sight from another age: a single, grizzled headstone from 1834. As construction crews built Towson Square, a four-acre, $85 million entertainment complex anchored by the multiplex on East Joppa Road, they worked around a tiny cemetery that holds the remains of about 18 of the town's earliest settlers.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2014
A chain-link fence marks the edge of Aberdeen Proving Ground, an Army installation where a nationwide base reorganization was supposed to bring so many people and jobs to Harford County that officials worried they would not have the space or resources to meet demand. Inside the fence, an estimated 21,000 people report to work, conducting research in massive new buildings. Shots fire in the distance. Sometimes bombs explode. But outside the fence, gleaming new offices completed in anticipation of economic spillover stand empty, a reminder that any growth that's taken place growth remains tightly contained.
SPORTS
By Jeff Ermann and Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
Editor's note: Each week,  InsideMDSports.com  provides this blog with a Maryland recruiting feature that previously appeared as premium content on its site. The past month was slow for hoops recruiting, thanks to the NCAA's limitation of early "open" periods. But with coaches allowed to hit the road again beginning last week, the pace in the class of 2015 has picked up considerably. Because of his growing interest in St. James point guard Justin Robinson , it seems Terps coach Mark Turgeon didn't press for a commitment from Kevin Dorsey . New offers Maryland handed out a couple of offers Tuesday to a pair of top-50 guards in Eric Davis and Prince Ali . It initially was thought that Mark Turgeon wouldn't pursue guards in 2015, but the transfers of Seth Allen and Roddy Peters, combined with transfer Terry Henderson's selection of North Carolina State, has him in the market for at least one and perhaps two in this recruiting class.
BUSINESS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
The Baltimore City Council passed a bill Thursday backed by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake to make 10 years of tax credits available citywide for developers of apartments. The council amended the legislation to include developers who renovate apartments as well as those who build new structures. "Expansion of the current apartment tax credit program continues to move us in the right direction by encouraging investment that supports neighborhoods, promotes historic preservation and generates millions of additional dollars for the city," Rawlings-Blake said in a statement.
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