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BUSINESS
October 11, 2011
Baltimore officials have finalized the $1.1 million sale of a 19-acre "brownfields" site on Pulaski Highway to construction magnate Willard Hackerman, who plans to develop a big-box store or warehouses or both, a city economic development official said Tuesday. The sale of the lot, the former site of a waste incinerator, was completed Friday, said M.J. "Jay" Brodie, president of the Baltimore Development Corp. The city's Planning Commission approved a "planned unit development" designation for the property a day earlier, allowing the uses proposed by Hackerman, president and chief executive of the Whiting-Turner Contracting Co. Hackerman formed Pulaski Limited Partnership to develop the Northeast Baltimore site and still needs City Council approval to proceed.
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NEWS
August 22, 2014
I can't recall the last time that a commercial real estate development site spilled more than 3 million gallons of raw sewage into the Maryland waterways but that's what the state of Maryland did last week ( "3 million-gallon sewage spill reported at Wagner's Point," Aug. 15). Maryland has instituted overwhelming changes over the last few years on commercial real estate development concerning storm water runoff on all development sites throughout the state. These changes were made to control the amount of rain water that leaves commercial sites.
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NEWS
By Frank Lynch and Frank Lynch,Staff Writer | August 15, 1993
A developer who is building more than 700 homes on Abingdon property that includes two closed landfills overcame the last obstacle to completing the project last week.Nineteen 55-gallon drums containing material thought to be printer's ink were removed from the construction site Monday.The drums were discovered Aug. 4 in a section of the former Johnson landfill, which operated as a rubble fill in the late 1970s and early 1980s. County records show that mostly tree stumps and dirt were deposited there.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2014
Eighty-eight-year-old Alfred Clasing Jr. and his wife, Marie, had hoped to spend their final years at a retirement community for veterans at Fort Howard, part of a scenic Baltimore County peninsula that juts into the Chesapeake Bay. But a developer's ambitious blueprint for the federally owned property fell through, contributing to a decade of inactivity at the site. Now, even as the government and another developer work on a project that would bring about 1,300 residential units for veterans and others to the 94-acre site, the Clasings doubt they will ever find a home there.
NEWS
August 22, 2014
I can't recall the last time that a commercial real estate development site spilled more than 3 million gallons of raw sewage into the Maryland waterways but that's what the state of Maryland did last week ( "3 million-gallon sewage spill reported at Wagner's Point," Aug. 15). Maryland has instituted overwhelming changes over the last few years on commercial real estate development concerning storm water runoff on all development sites throughout the state. These changes were made to control the amount of rain water that leaves commercial sites.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Staff writer | April 23, 1992
County planners may soon require residential developers to set asidelarge parcels, instead of numerous smaller ones, to ensure adequate space for parks in new communities.County Planning Director Ardath Cade said yesterday she hopes to have proposed regulations tightening requirements for developers submitted to County Executive Robert R. Neall soon after County Council budget hearings are completed next month.The proposed changes will spell out how much land developers of large parcels would be required to set aside as either pastoral open space or for recreational uses, Cade said.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff writer | April 26, 1992
A Baltimore development company has filed suit against the County Council, contending that it improperly delayed water and sewer service to a development site where the company wants to build 1,600 homes.Security Management Corp. is asking the county Circuit Court to strike the council's approval of a plan that downgrades its development site.Security Management, operated by Victor Posner, is planning to build single-family houses and multifamily units at a 315-acre site offRoute 7, west of Aberdeen.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff writer | January 19, 1992
The way Jan Stinchcomb sees it, somebody has to look out for the health of her future neighbors in Abingdon.So she's organized a group of about 30 Abingdon residents to keep watch on county reviews of aproposed Abingdon development of more than 700 homes that would be built near four closed landfills.One of the dumps is on the federal Superfund list of hazardous waste sites.Many of the concerned citizens don't live near the development site, but want to make sure that health and environmental questions about the dumps are answered before the development is allowedby county planners to proceed, Stinchcomb said.
NEWS
January 31, 2012
Your editorial about the proposed Maryland flush tax failed to mention a number of facts ("The flush tax blues," Jan. 27). For one, the upgrade of the treatment plants was originally budgeted at $550 million by the Glendening administration. It's easy to pass on the financial responsibility for a bill to your successor. What about the farms? According to the Chesapeake Bay Program, agriculture is responsible for 40.9 percent of the nitrogen and 46.5 percent of the phosphorus released into the Chesapeake Bay. Nothing is being done about this.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Chris Guy and Tom Pelton and Chris Guy,Sun reporters | November 7, 2006
Cambridge -- The Ehrlich administration announced yesterday that it plans to spend $10.4 million to preserve about two-thirds of a contested development site near the Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge. The effort to save 754 acres of Eastern Shore farmland marks a change in direction for the administration, which previously declined to get involved in what it called a mostly local land-use decision. The purchase agreement will still allow developer Duane Zentgraf to build more than 600 homes, marketed to senior citizens, on 326 acres of farmland on the southern fringe of this city.
NEWS
June 30, 2014
In response to Baltimore County Councilman David Marks' recent letter about the proposed Nottingham Ridge Outlet Mall, I would again point out the project's appalling lack of community input ("Marks: Consider the alternative to the outlet mall plan," June 23). As Councilman Marks is aware, I have been a long-time supporter of both his work with the Baltimore County Council and his volunteer work within the community. In fact, I believe our working friendship began in 2008, when he was president of the Perry Hall Improvement Association and I was president of the Perry Hall Middle School PTSA.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2013
Baltimore County Council members rejected state funding Monday for a planned low-income housing development in Rosedale, passing a resolution expressing disapproval of the project. In a 6-0 vote, with Councilman Kenneth Oliver abstaining, council members turned down more than $1 million in funding from the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development for a project planned by the nonprofit Homes for America. "Baltimore County is becoming poorer and poorer, and a lot of people can't afford high-end housing," said Oliver, a Randallstown Democrat, after the council meeting.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | October 28, 2013
A Baltimore City-mandated citizens' advisory committee that few people knew existed until this month scrambled to meet Saturday, ahead of a Monday deadline to make recommendations to the Planning Department about a proposed shopping center with a Walmart store in Remington. Although 15 area residents attended the meeting at Corky's Grill near the development site, only two were committee members, so the five-member committee lacked a quorum and can only issue "a report of those present," said John Viles, who chaired the meeting.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | October 22, 2013
The court of mixed public opinion about a planned shopping center in Remington is in full fact-finding and soul-searching modes this week. Developers of 25th Street Station are going back before several community groups and a key city panel with proposed changes that they say would make the center and its centerpiece, a 104,000-square-foot Walmart store, more pedestrian-friendly and easier on the eye. Also, a Baltimore City councilman is...
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2013
The developer of Harbor Point plans to buy the initial offering of city-issued bonds for the $1.8 billion project, accruing millions in interest from the controversial public financing deal, city officials confirmed Thursday. Developer Michael S. Beatty's Harbor Point Development Group LLC plans to purchase about $35 million of the $107 million in bonds and would earn an estimated 6.5 percent interest rate, enabling him to pay for a construction loan. Stephen M. Kraus, the city's chief of treasury management, said the arrangement would save the city money because a private sale is cheaper to orchestrate than a public bond offering.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2013
The Inn at the Black Olive, a 12-suite boutique hotel in Fells Point known for eco-friendly amenities, will be offered for sale at a foreclosure auction Thursday. An auction by Alex Cooper Auctioneers Inc. is slated for 9 a.m. at the South Caroline Street site of the two-year-old inn, which touts features such as organic bedding and towels, harbor-view balconies and spa bathrooms with aqua-therapy tubs. The inn is owned by the Spiliadis family, which operates the Black Olive Restaurant on Bond Street, also in Fells Point.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Staff Writer | November 25, 1992
A major Canton condominium development site will go to auction Dec. 17 when A. J. Billig & Co. tries to sell land once slated to become Lighthouse Point, a luxury development that fell victim to the recession.The land for the stalled development is being sold on behalf of Maryland National Bank, said Jack F. Billig, head of the auction firm.The developers, Baltimore International Yachting Centre L.P., owed Maryland National $8.65 million on June 1, representing money borrowed against the 7.9-acre tract on Boston Street.
NEWS
December 6, 2005
What a difference a day makes - and some public grousing. An invitation-only meeting on development guidelines for a prime piece of waterfront property in South Baltimore that sparked criticism from the uninvited is now a "come one, come all" event. Openness is always in the public's interest and especially on matters involving a development site that has generated such intense community interest and debate. But let's put the Baltimore Development Corp.'s meeting, planned for tonight, in perspective.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2013
The redevelopment of an 11-acre tract in Baltimore's Remington neighborhood can move ahead now that the state's highest court has ruled on a zoning appeal that held up the plan for years. "The project would have been done, generating benefits for the community and taxes for the city if these petitions had not been filed," said Jon Laria, the attorney for the developer of the mixed-used project, called 25th Street Station. On Tuesday, the Maryland Court of Appeals released its unanimous opinion that two people who live near the development site, one in Remington and the other in Charles Village, are not eligible to appeal the Baltimore City Council's decision to grant the zoning approval for the project.
BUSINESS
By Steve Earley, The Baltimore Sun | December 21, 2012
If it's already better to give than to receive, technology has made giving even better by making donating to charity more accessible and participatory. Or, as Bill and Melinda Gates put it last week, "easier and more fun. " The combination is especially attractive to seasonal or infrequent donors, such as the many now catching the holiday spirit, gifting for an altruistic friend or seeking to increase their tax deductions. With this audience in mind, the Gateses blogged five ways to give online they believe are innovative and well-run.
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