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NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,Sun Staff Writer | April 3, 1995
The Annapolis Finance Committee will hold a public hearing tonight to consider how much money to put toward several large-scale development projects in the city next year, including a high-profile renovation of City Dock.Annapolis officials launched the $10 million project for the city's historic waterfront last month. This year, the city had hoped to put $1.5 million into the project, with the city and state contributing equal shares of the cost.The state House Appropriations Committee rejected the idea, but the state Senate Budget and Taxation Committee brokered a deal with city officials last week to grant Annapolis $500,000 for preliminary work on the project.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2014
Maryland developers are once again digging into plans to build near rail stations, a sign that the appetite for development projects focused on transit may be coming back. This week, developers will break ground on a new 700-car parking garage and commuter station in Savage, the first part of an 18.5-acre development anchored by a MARC rail station. In March, the state court of appeals cleared the lawsuit blocking development of State Center near a Metro and light rail stop. Construction began in April on a new headquarters for the Department of Housing and Community Development near the New Carrollton Metro.
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NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN REPORTER | February 8, 2007
Development projects under way last year in downtown Baltimore totaled nearly $1.9 billion, more than the area has seen for years, according to a report scheduled for release today. Much of that - about $1.6 billion worth - is still under construction, the nonprofit Downtown Partnership of Baltimore said in its annual State of Downtown report.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2014
The city is seeking development ideas for a 16-acre group of properties close to Old Town Mall, an East Baltimore shopping strip that has struggled despite being the target of revitalization efforts for more than 40 years. The request for proposals, expected to be released Thursday, involves two city-owned parcels, a 7.5-acre triangle at the corner of Ensor and Orleans Streets and the roughly 8.7-acre former site of the Somerset Homes, a public housing complex that was torn down in 2009.
NEWS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,Sun Staff Writer | December 1, 1994
Mathias J. DeVito, the Rouse Co. leader who transformed the real estate company from an entrepreneurial developer to one of the country's largest commercial property owners, announced yesterday that he will retire as chief executive officer in February.During his tenure as CEO, Rouse cemented its reputation as the creator of urban "festival marketplaces," such as Baltimore's Harborplace and Faneuil Hall Marketplace in Boston, and his departure from daily operations comes at a time of record earnings for the Columbia-based company.
NEWS
March 13, 1991
The Office of Economic Development will conduct a briefing session on how to apply for a Maryland Industrial Partnerships (MIPS) grant at8:30 a.m. Mar. 20, Room 209-C, Arundel Center North, Glen Burnie.The MIPS program matches state firms with resources at the University of Maryland to develop new and improved products, services of processes that will help the firms compete in their markets and lead to economic benefit to the state. Firms need not be technology-oriented toqualify.Since January 1988, 179 matching grants have been awarded for research and development projects performed by University of Maryland faculty in partnerships with local companies.
NEWS
June 13, 2007
The bill passed Monday by Baltimore's City Council that will require developers to include a percentage of affordable housing units in new developments is a welcome strategy to provide more opportunities for low-income residents to remain in the city. Similar policies have been successfully implemented in Montgomery and other counties. This major step forward should work in Baltimore - so long as it dovetails with the city's efforts to convert vacant houses into viable places to live. Like many surrounding areas, Baltimore's housing prices have climbed significantly in recent years.
NEWS
November 4, 1991
The following bond referendums will appear on tomorrow's general election ballot. If approved by voters, they would authorize the city to borrow money for projects listed in each individual question.* Question A -- $8 million for the Community Development Loan Program. Specific projects include $3.6 million for city matching funds for existing federal Community Development Block Grants; $200,000 for rental housing for low-income families; $200,000 for Nehemiah Housing Two in Cherry Hill; $100,000 for tree-planting and other improvements to approach-ways to the city; $300,000 for the Conservation Area Program, which funds development and improvements in communities outside urban renewal areas; $100,000 for waterfront development improvements; $200,000 for grants to neighborhoods for local projects such as a small park; $800,000 for other community-based development projects; $500,000 for Charles Center-Market Center street improvements; and $1.5 million for the city's share of the Christopher Columbus Maritime History Center at Piers 5 and 6.* Question B -- $4 million for loans for the Community Development Financing Corp.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | July 19, 1995
A mayoral task force has come up with a new round of suggestions on how to boost Baltimore's economy, ranging from directing $20 million of the city's pension investments to local development projects to increasing the marketing budget for tourism.The Economics Incentives Task Force, created by Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke in 1992 to encourage business growth and job creation, also recommended that the mayor appoint an economic development coordinator to work out of his office and initiate a "Buy Baltimore" program for goods and services.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,SUN STAFF | October 14, 2002
Baltimore voters will be asked to approve $120 million in community and economic development projects intended largely to improve neighborhoods and schools and spur business development. Voters will decide on 14 bond proposals Nov. 5. M. J. "Jay" Brodie, president of Baltimore Development Corp., the city's main economic development arm, said the borrowed money is needed to "continue to allow Baltimore to be competitive with other cities and to take advantage of the great assets and build on them."
NEWS
March 29, 2014
A decade ago, the redevelopment of the state office complex in midtown Baltimore — now known as State Center — looked like a no-brainer. Built in the 1950s and 1960s, the five buildings in the 28-acre complex, which hadn't exactly been architecturally inspired to begin with, needed to be replaced. And the site's access to Baltimore's Metro subway system suggested great potential for transit-oriented development. But wait, it was even better than that. State Center is also convenient to the city's major cultural attractions and to the light rail line as well as MARC commuter rail, so state and city officials thought big — a $1.5 billion mixed use project with apartments for a variety of income levels, a grocery store and shopping as well as a parking garage and office space for state employees, all of which could be accomplished as a public-private partnership.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2014
HBO's Martin Luther King miniseries is going to have a strong Baltimore flavor with David Simon confirming Wednesday that he will be involved in the project based on the books of Baltimore author Taylor Branch. Deadline.com first reported Simon's involvement in the project as speculation today, with Mike Fleming Jr. writing , "I'm hearing that David Simon , the architect of the HBO series The Wire, Homicide and most recently Treme , will spearhead the HBO six-hour miniseries adaptation of America: In The King Years , based on the celebrated book trilogy by Pulitzer Prize-winner Taylor Branch.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2014
Developers of the Foundry Row retail project in Owings Mills say they are on track to start construction this summer on a $140 million shopping center featuring Baltimore County's second Wegmans grocery store. In an opinion issued this week, the county Board of Appeals upheld an administrative law judge's earlier decision to approve the development at the site of the former Solo Cup plant on Reisterstown Road. And Thursday, officials at Greenberg Gibbons, the center developer, said their company has settled a lawsuit that Solo Cup filed against it involving damage to energy plant equipment on the 50-acre property.
NEWS
July 22, 2013
The Four Seasons at Kent Island may be viewed as many things, but surely one of them is a reality check for all the complaints of state government usurping control over land use decisions from local government (not mention all the harping on Maryland as an anti-growth state or a developer's worst nightmare). On Wednesday, the state Board of Public Works will once again take up the topic of the Four Seasons, a project that in 2007 came to symbolize the lack of teeth in Maryland's efforts to protect the Chesapeake Bay from excess development in the "critical" areas near the bay and its tidal tributaries.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2013
Owings Mills-based developer David S. Brown Enterprises Ltd. plans to construct a 30-story mixed-use building on West Baltimore Street on the eastern edge of the University of Maryland, Baltimore campus. A parking structure and four-story building would be demolished to make way for the mid-block tower, which would be flanked on its western side by the historic Abell Building. Early plans for the structure were approved by the city's architectural review panel Thursday. The building, at 325 W. Baltimore St., is planned to contain roughly 100,000 square feet of office space, about 225 apartments and above-ground parking for approximately 400 vehicles.
NEWS
May 3, 2013
I applaud The Sun for its recent editorial on income inequality ("Labor reawakens," April 27). The increasing income inequality in this country affects the ability of families to survive, much less thrive, on what they earn from minimum wage jobs. The editorial highlighted a labor strike by Chicago low-wage workers and their "Fight for 15" rally. Yet the fact that Baltimore workers are organizing around "fair development" was mentioned in only one sentence. I wonder why The Sun did not find it important to cover the local "reawakening" here by reporting on the Fair Development Rally and March held April 20th.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney | January 21, 1992
BTR Realty Inc., a Linthicum developer that has hit hard times during the recession, said yesterday that it will fold its development division into other operations to concentrate on managing its existing properties, which include the Harford Mall and York Road Plaza.The consolidation will mean that four of the division's seven executives will leave the company, BTR President F. Patrick Hughes said. One of them, Vernon D. Kalkman, was president of BTR until Mr. Hughes replaced him in 1990.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney | January 21, 1992
BTR Realty Inc., a Linthicum developer that has hit hard times during the recession, said yesterday that it will fold its development division into other operations to concentrate on managing its existing properties, which include the Harford Mall and York Road Plaza.The consolidation will mean that four of the division's seven executives will leave the company, BTR President F. Patrick Hughes said. One of them, Vernon D. Kalkman, was president of BTR until Mr. Hughes replaced him in 1990.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2011
Baltimore County Council members said Tuesday that county development chief Arnold Jablon should not have acted as the attorney for a local environmental engineer who has worked for builders on projects in Baltimore County. Jablon, who worked for the Venable law firm before becoming head of the county's department of permits, approvals and inspections this year, is the lawyer of record in a small-claims case brought in Baltimore County District Court this summer by George Perdikakis.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2011
The City Council's finance committee chairman threatened Thursday to impose a moratorium on tax breaks for developers until City Hall implements more transparency in the process and funds more projects outside of downtown. Carl Stokes, who chairs the Taxation, Finance and Economic Development Committee, said he wants to see City Hall implement nearly a dozen recommendations from a task force composed of some of Baltimore's best-known business and political leaders before he would allow any more PILOT (payment in lieu of taxes)
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