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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 5, 2000
UNITED NATIONS -- After years of treading carefully around the issue of why so many countries stay poor or get poorer, the United Nations said in a report yesterday that much of the blame goes to bad government, a message that many leaders seeking more aid and debt relief do not want to hear. The report from the U.N. Development Program, the world's largest aid agency, is a call to rethink traditional ideas about battling poverty in the Third World. The report elevates "good governance" to the top priority in fighting poverty by the development program's new administrator, Mark Malloch Brown, whose organization supports a range of governance projects.
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NEWS
Letter to The Aegis | March 4, 2014
Editor: During County Executive Craig's final State of the County Address, he extolled the accomplishments of his administration. Most notable among these were many construction projects, including a new sheriff's office, emergency operations center, new schools, etc. Presumably, Mr. Craig believes that these edifices alone fulfill his commitment to public safety and education. While Mr. Craig's commitment to development and construction cannot be questioned, his commitment to both public safety and education are suspect.
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FEATURES
April 22, 1998
The Sun has assembled a panel of professionals to address your concerns about how your child is learning to read. Your questions and their responses will appear regularly on these pages. Responding to today's question is Susan Rapp, M.Ed, a reading specialist and director of Village Reading Center in Columbia.Question: I have a 9-year-old daughter who struggles with reading and writing and has some difficulty with speech. A friend told me about a program called FastForward. Have you ever heard of this program?
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2013
As he traveled through Baltimore to promote his jobs agenda on Friday, President Barack Obama found himself sitting near a 29-year-old man who was uncertain how to reset his life after being released from prison two years ago. In one of the few spontaneous moments of the president's visit, Marcus Dixon - father of two boys - told Obama how he connected in 2011 with a workforce development group called the Center for Urban Families, put his life...
NEWS
December 13, 1998
Schools and literacy programs seek volunteers to help children and adults improve reading skills and assist in related projects.Among them are:Baltimore County's adult education program, run through the public schools and community college system, to work with adults in reading, math, General Educational Development studies and the English for Speakers of Other Languages program. Tutoring takes place during day and evening hours at locations across the county. Tutor training sessions, consisting of two three-hour classes, are planned in January, February and March.
NEWS
August 18, 1991
More than $3.2 million is now available for qualified first-time homebuyers through Harford County's Mortgage Purchase Program. The funding is made possible through a state Department of Housing and Community Development program.Under MMP, the maximum purchase price for an existing unit is $80,000, or $85,000 for new construction. The loan can be used toward the purchase of single-family residences, including town houses, detached or semi-detached homes or condominium units. The purchase of a modular home qualifies for financing it it carries the state seal of approval for safety code compliance.
NEWS
December 31, 2012
Over the past decade many studies have reached the conclusion that investing in high-quality early childhood education is a successful hedge against poverty. Students who attend Head Start, America's comprehensive early childhood education and development program for poor children, are far better prepared to learn when they enter kindergarten. They are referred for special education services less frequently and they are also more likely to graduate high school. As adults they are less likely to be incarcerated and more likely to be successful, contributing members of society than those who do not attend such programs.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff Writer | June 14, 1992
Harford is at risk of losing the rural character that lured many new residents to the county during the building boom of the late 1980s.That's the consensus of planners who last week made public a draft of a three-part program aimed at directing growth away from agricultural land.Planners have noticed for several years that more sprawling development was occurring in rural areas, said Michael Paone, the agricultural planner in the county's Department of Planning and Zoning.Between 1985 and 1990, Harford lost about 15,000 acres of farmland to development, said Paone.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | June 25, 1993
Washington. -- Ask an American which of the world's countries offers the highest quality of living, and you're likely to be told, ''The good old U.S.A.'' That's a reasonable, if predictable reply. On the whole, life is good here.But put the same query to a neutral party that has access to worldwide social and economic data -- someone, say, like the United Nations -- and you get a surprisingly different response.The United States ranks only sixth in the latest Human Development Index published by the U.N. Development Program behind Japan, Canada, Norway, Switzerland and Sweden.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2012
In former Orioles outfielder Brady Anderson's new role as special assistant to executive vice president of baseball operations Dan Duquette, his duties will include mostly player development and conditioning tasks. Duquette said on a conference call Thursday that Anderson's role with the team will be different from  former Phillies general manager Lee Thomas, who shares the same title but handles more of an assistant general manager role under Duquette. The Orioles announced their hiring of Anderson, an Orioles Hall of Famer, on Thursday afternoon.
NEWS
December 31, 2012
Over the past decade many studies have reached the conclusion that investing in high-quality early childhood education is a successful hedge against poverty. Students who attend Head Start, America's comprehensive early childhood education and development program for poor children, are far better prepared to learn when they enter kindergarten. They are referred for special education services less frequently and they are also more likely to graduate high school. As adults they are less likely to be incarcerated and more likely to be successful, contributing members of society than those who do not attend such programs.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2012
Byron Mouton has often had to reinvent himself. A big scorer in high school in Louisiana who turned into more of a defensive stopper during his two seasons at Maryland, Mouton tried to start an online basketball apparel company while finishing his professional career in China three years ago. "I called it '6th Man For The True Fan,'" Mouton recalled recently. "People could take any jersey and we'd put their name on it. But after I came back to Maryland after the season, the business connection I had for the fabric in China went away.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2012
In former Orioles outfielder Brady Anderson's new role as special assistant to executive vice president of baseball operations Dan Duquette, his duties will include mostly player development and conditioning tasks. Duquette said on a conference call Thursday that Anderson's role with the team will be different from  former Phillies general manager Lee Thomas, who shares the same title but handles more of an assistant general manager role under Duquette. The Orioles announced their hiring of Anderson, an Orioles Hall of Famer, on Thursday afternoon.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | August 28, 2008
J. Lee Majeskie, a retired professor in the department of animal and avian sciences at the University of Maryland and an internationally known dairy cattle judge, died Friday of a heart attack at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The Centreville resident was 67. Dr. Majeskie was born in Waukesha, Wis., and raised on his family's Holstein dairy farm near Pewaukee, Wis. After graduating from Waukesha South High School in 1959, he earned his bachelor's and master's degrees in dairy science from the University of Wisconsin.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | May 28, 2005
CHARLOTTE, N.C. - About 17 years ago, a frustrated race driver named Janet Guthrie said this during a preseason Winston Cup media tour: "Do you realize that Winston Cup racing and Indy Car racing are the only top-level major sports in this country that meet the Aryan Nation's exclusively white and male laws? "If you think there is an absence of women and blacks in the top echelons of racing because there is an absence of women and blacks with talent, you better re-examine your thinking.
NEWS
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,SUN STAFF | May 1, 2005
For Severna Park resident Ken Gill, it was not enough to thank the doctors at Anne Arundel Medical Center and walk away. Instead, ever since he was successfully treated for prostate cancer 15 years ago, Gill has been planning to give back to the institution that saved his life. Gill and his wife, Joanne, recently donated $1 million to the Anne Arundel Medical Center Foundation, funds they designated for the hospital's "personal navigator" program. Run by nurses, the program supports, mentors and educates patients diagnosed with prostate cancer, which the American Cancer Society ranks as the second-most-common type of cancer found in men. "I wanted to help men and their families go through the very emotional process of deciding what their treatment options are," said Gill, 67, a father of three.
NEWS
By Jonathan Freedman | September 29, 1993
THE declining fortunes of America's children are starkly visible to all of us. But for every social problem that causes children to suffer, someone has developed a preventive or healing technique somewhere. The most promising efforts start before birth, with prenatal care, and follow through as a child learns to crawl, toddle and run. They can't replace parental love but can support parents struggling to raise their young.Two programs stand out as models: The Comprehensive Child Development Program, a federal demonstration project in 24 sites nationally, and the Center for Family Life, a community program in Brooklyn, N.Y. They reflect different approaches -- public and private -- for distinct communities.
NEWS
September 19, 1991
Howard County Executive Chuck Ecker, who has spent a good deal of his first year plugging the fiscal leaks in the budget, deserves commendation for looking up from the balance sheets and looking ahead 20 years.A study commissioned by Ecker, released this week, recognizes the long-term social problems that will arise from continued budget crunches, and proposes a new and invigorated role for the Office of Economic Development to meet them head-on. The plan is loosely called "Eckernomics."It basically calls on local government to perform functions far beyond the scope of its traditional pothole-patching role -- to set up a venture-capital fund to attract new business, to support existing businesses, to ensure a stock of affordable housing, spur small business development, run employment and job-training programs and more.
NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | April 12, 2005
PHILADELPHIA - One of the most hotly debated questions in the Arab world - and in the United States - is whether the Bush administration has sparked a democratic tsunami in the Middle East. U.S. officials argue that Iraqi elections, along with presidential rhetoric on Arab democracy, have inspired reformers throughout the region. Many Arab intellectuals retort that they have been struggling for years to effect social and political change but have been blocked by U.S. support for authoritarian rulers.
SPORTS
By KEN MURRAY | August 22, 2004
As if the selection of J.P. Losman in the first round of April's draft weren't warning enough, Buffalo quarterback Drew Bledsoe gets a wakeup call whenever he shuffles into the pocket at Bills practices this summer. It's a hand-held, mail-order, $49 timer that rings four seconds after Bledsoe gets the ball. In an attempt to condition Bledsoe to get passes off more quickly, new coach Mike Mularkey has conditioning coach Brad Roll hold the device during seven-on-seven and 11-on-11 drills.
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