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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2012
The lawyer for a Catonsville community association tried unsuccessfully again Thursday to delay a Baltimore County hearing on a proposed medical office building, saying state prosecutors' requests for information on the project have raised questions about the county's development process. Attorney J. Carroll Holzer, representing the Kenwood Gardens Condominium Association, called the situation unprecedented as the administrative hearing opened. His clients oppose construction of the Southwest Physicians Pavilion planned by Whalen Properties.
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EXPLORE
Letter to The Aegis | October 3, 2013
The following comments were included in a more lengthy presentation to the Harford County Council on Tuesday. A copy was provided for publication. On Sept. 17 the Harford County Council acting as the Board of Appeals ratified and adopted the Hearing Examiner's Decision for Case 5781 for a special development to permit a planned residential development for the construction of 198 apartment units at Plumtree and Route 24. I was disappointed with this decision and have questions about the decision and concerns how the hearing was conducted for final arguments on Sept.
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NEWS
By Andrew Green and Andrew Green,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2004
In a move to give builders more flexibility while offering residents more input, the Baltimore County Council approved legislation unanimously yesterday to overhaul the rarely used "planned unit development" process. The bill also includes measures to encourage building more assisted-living facilities for senior citizens in the county. A handful of community activists worked extensively with the bill's prime sponsor, Councilman Kevin Kamenetz, a Pikesville-Ruxton Democrat, and succeeded in attaching several amendments to the bill aimed at making new developments compatible with existing communities.
EXPLORE
February 1, 2013
The "Inner Arbor" plan is a major breakthrough for CA and the community.  The plan is bold, exciting and wide ranging.  We should celebrate its introduction.  CA's now entrenched approach to community development is to act parochially; with a knee-jerk, anti-developer attitude to boot. Throughout the downtown redevelopment process CA testified and behaved as just another landowner - albeit a key one. In fact CA can be both a community leader...
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Baltimore County Bureau Patrick Gilbert contributed to this story | February 4, 1992
Baltimore County residents will have a much greater say in how growth affects their communities as a result of sweeping changes in the development process approved last night by the County Council.The seven-member council gave unanimous approval to the first major change in the process in a decade. The new laws include three key provisions that:* Require developers to meet with affected community groups before beginning the approval process, a move designed to avoid unwelcome surprises and give residents and builders a chance to negotiate their differences.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | April 5, 2004
The Baltimore County Council is likely to revamp today a rarely used development process that was meant to encourage creative, high-quality development. One of the most complicated pieces of legislation the council has attempted in years, the measure would also overhaul the way construction of assisted-living facilities is approved in the county. Councilman Kevin Kamenetz, the Pikesville-Ruxton Democrat who wrote the bill, said he has seen a great need for more housing for the elderly in the county.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | November 1, 2001
An advisory committee studying Howard County's development process recommended a list of modest steps yesterday designed to alert residents when something is proposed in their neighborhoods - and what to do about it - before the bulldozers show up. The recommendations deal with "conditional uses," which are projects such as child-care centers, gas stations and senior housing that require permission from the county Board of Appeals. Among other changes, committee members want to require that developers meet with residents before submitting plans to the county.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Mary Gail Hare and Brenda J. Buote and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | February 25, 1999
The Carroll Board of County Commissioners announced yesterday the reorganization of four departments, the elimination of several key positions and the goals of their four-year term, claiming the changes could save taxpayers $300,000.The commissioners said the county will save in salaries and benefits by eliminating six positions, most of them in the planning department. The changes take effect today."We're aiming for efficiency in government," said board President Julia Walsh Gouge. "We've outlined our goals for the next four years.
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Sun Staff Writer | May 15, 1995
J. Carroll Holzer has trampled through Baltimore County's garden of zoning and development regulations for more than 12 years, earning his living as a lawyer and growing a reputation for kicking dirt in the faces of developers and bureaucrats.He loses many more cases than he wins, but clients don't seem to mind because Mr. Holzer has chosen a specialty that few attorneys want to touch -- representing community groups in land use battles."It gives me a sense of completeness to take a case no one else wants, knowing all the while you're fighting an uphill battle," he says.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | June 11, 1998
Saying they are fed up with zoning loopholes and being shut out of the development process, some Baltimore County community leaders are calling for changes in the county's planning and land-use laws.The group last night released Project 98, a 111-page document demanding improvements in the county's comprehensive planning, zoning and development review process; stronger regulations to assure that projects are compatible with surrounding neighborhoods; a tougher adequate public facilities law; and better public access to meetings and information.
EXPLORE
January 31, 2013
CA's plans to circumvent the county-mandated 16-step development approval process should not be allowed. During the lengthy downtown rezoning discussions residents argued long and hard for a process that would keep them informed of planned development in advance with opportunities to provide input into the process. This resulted in the county adopting the 16-step approval process. CA pushed the original plan for Symphony Woods, which included some ground-level walkways with a few amenities on the north side of Merriweather Post Pavilion, through the first eight steps to achieve the Planning Board's approval. CA is now changing the plan to elevated walkways with numerous different amenities on the east side of MPP and claims it can just start with step nine to acquire the rest of the needed approvals.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2013
Once upon a time, people interested in taking a picture used a device known as a camera. Taking pictures was all that this device did. It could never make phone calls. Or play music and video. The pictures were captured on something called film, which came in a roll and had to be inserted into the camera. A certain number of photographs could be taken on each roll, and the used roll had to be removed from the camera to be developed. The development process took time. And chemicals.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2012
The lawyer for a Catonsville community association tried unsuccessfully again Thursday to delay a Baltimore County hearing on a proposed medical office building, saying state prosecutors' requests for information on the project have raised questions about the county's development process. Attorney J. Carroll Holzer, representing the Kenwood Gardens Condominium Association, called the situation unprecedented as the administrative hearing opened. His clients oppose construction of the Southwest Physicians Pavilion planned by Whalen Properties.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2012
A Baltimore County administrative law judge turned down Monday a request from a community association to postpone a hearing on a proposed medical office building in Catonsville that has drawn scrutiny from state investigators. Last week, the Office of the State Prosecutor subpoenaed eight county agencies for information about the Southwest Physicians Pavilion, a proposed project by Whalen Properties on a 2.5-acre site next to the Baltimore Beltway. The prosecutor's office has not commented on the reason for the subpoenas.
NEWS
July 8, 2012
In the tussle over mega-development projects in Owings Mills, it's about time we had an adult in the room. Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz, who is ordinarily loath to interfere with the County Council's prerogatives when it comes to land use and zoning, is stepping into that role with his promise to veto a piece of legislation that amounted to a massive giveaway to two developers. The bill, passed by the council on Monday, represented legislative sausage making at its worst and could have swamped Owings Mills' already overtaxed infrastructure.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2012
Baltimore County Councilman Kenneth Oliver wants his colleagues to reject a proposal to allow a retail development anchored by a Wegmans supermarket at the former Solo Cup plant site in Owings Mills. Oliver represents a district near the site and said his main concern about the proposed Foundry Row development is traffic congestion on Reisterstown Road. The Randallstown Democrat said he also believes the site, which is in Council Chairwoman Vicki Almond's district, should be preserved as manufacturing property and said using it for retail is not "smart growth.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,sun reporter | February 7, 2007
The Howard County Council approved one bill this week and received two more aimed at making it easier for residents to learn what developers have in store for their neighborhoods. The bill approved unanimously at Monday night's session would require developers to hold information meetings about their plans in public or institutional buildings within five miles of the construction site, unless a waiver is issued by county officials, before formally submitting plans to the county. The council also approved the appointment of Kevin Doyle and James D. Walsh to the county Board of Appeals.
BUSINESS
By PHILIP MOELLER | November 21, 1990
M E M O R A N D U MTo: Mayor Kurt L. SchmokeFrom: Mr. Rockthrower, ofthe Calvert St. RockthrowersRe: City development issuesYour recent naming of David M. Gillece as acting president of Center City-Inner Harbor Development Inc. raises some significant issues for how Baltimore manages the development process. It also provides a good opportunity to conduct a thorough review of this process. And, should you wish to view this as a strategic issue, your handling of this matter could have a positive impact on your re-election efforts.
NEWS
July 6, 2011
The Baltimore County Council managed to wring something of real value from an ugly confrontation over a townhouse development in Catonsville on Monday night when it agreed to an amendment adding meaningful community input and professional analysis to the planned unit development process. PUDs are meant to allow the construction of high-quality projects that benefit the community even if they don't conform to traditional zoning rules, but community leaders increasingly see them as a way for politically connected developers to skirt the law. The proposal introduced Monday by Councilman David Marks, a Perry Hall-Towson Republican, and adopted 6-1, requires a community input meeting and initial analysis by county agencies before a council member introduces a resolution authorizing the formal consideration of a PUD proposal, and that is unquestionably an improvement.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2011
The Baltimore County Council approved significant changes on Tuesday evening to a land development approach that has often drawn fire from community activists, a move that council members said would stop bad projects early and make the development process more open. At the same time, the council reversed itself and revived a planned unit development project in Catonsville that has already received poor reviews from county planning and environmental agencies. The council voted in May to kill the Thistle Landing project, which calls for 10 townhouses off Frederick Road, the main thoroughfare through the Catonsville town center.
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