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By Patrick W. Quirk | January 6, 2014
The United States is developing its second Quadrennial Diplomacy and Development Review (QDDR) - a broad assessment of the State Department and United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and their effectiveness in furthering the country's foreign-policy objectives amid a changing world of rising powers. The first QDDR, completed in 2010, outlined an expansive framework for augmenting and leveraging U.S. "civilian power" to advance core American interests in a changing world of new threats and rising powers.
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NEWS
By Patrick W. Quirk | January 6, 2014
The United States is developing its second Quadrennial Diplomacy and Development Review (QDDR) - a broad assessment of the State Department and United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and their effectiveness in furthering the country's foreign-policy objectives amid a changing world of rising powers. The first QDDR, completed in 2010, outlined an expansive framework for augmenting and leveraging U.S. "civilian power" to advance core American interests in a changing world of new threats and rising powers.
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NEWS
May 24, 2002
FEW AFRICAN nations can escape occasional droughts. But six countries from Malawi to Zimbabwe have been hit by something far more insidious - killer floods that first wiped out crops, followed by a merciless aridity that has baked the soil hard as rock. Some 5 million people are threatened with starvation. Nature's vagaries are only a partial reason for this unfolding disaster. Zimbabwe, long regarded as the region's bread basket, is a case in point. Drought, combined with President Robert Mugabe's disastrous expulsion of white farmers, has produced a man-made calamity in which the area planted with corn fell by 54 percent in a single year.
NEWS
By David Horsey | December 25, 2012
If you want to see where rank hypocrisy sits in full flower, you have only to observe Republicans at their desks in the House and Senate. There, they have been openly ridiculing President Barack Obama's proposed $50 billion stimulus bill for desperately needed infrastructure work. When Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell heard of the president's plan, he derisively laughed out loud, as if he'd been handed a piece of road kill. At about the same time, Bill Shuster, a Pennsylvania Republican who is incoming chairman of the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, baldly declared: There will be no stimulus in any fiscal-cliff budget deal.
NEWS
October 23, 2011
The recent Republican presidential candidate debate in Las Vegas put a new spotlight on the issue of U.S. spending on foreign aid, although it may have escaped the notice of many ("Republicans take off gloves in Vegas debate," Oct. 19). Times are tough and Americans need to understand why it is vital that we continue to send development aid overseas: It increases jobs here in the U.S. and keeps our homeland safer. My firm is an international development company that employs American workers (and local partners as well)
TOPIC
By John McKenzie and John McKenzie,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 14, 2002
HO CHI MINH CITY, Vietnam -- At the United Nations conference last month in Monterrey, Mexico, world leaders agreed that the war on terrorism can only be won with a major effort to help the poorest. President Bush pledged a 30 percent increase in U.S. development aid, providing a $10 billion three-year program of additional funds. European leaders also pledged to increase spending by 18 percent. Good news for the poor? Not necessarily. Despite the brave words and pledges, the rich countries will have to deal more honestly, practically and even more generously.
NEWS
June 21, 2005
THIS YEAR has frequently been touted as pivotal for Africa. Stars have aligned to focus global attention on that rich but troubled continent, prompting calls for renewed attempts to make African economies self-sustaining and for redoubled efforts to combat poverty and disease. Rock musicians, evangelists, European leaders and world trade ministers have all signed on to a grand lobbying effort intended to free Africans from debt, boost humanitarian relief and development aid, and drop protectionist barriers to African products.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 18, 2001
WASHINGTON - As the war in Afghanistan nears a possible conclusion, Britain is putting increasing pressure on the United States to follow the fighting with a worldwide anti-poverty program unmatched in scale since the rebuilding of Europe after World War II. Gordon Brown, Britain's chancellor of the exchequer, lobbied Treasury Secretary Paul H. O'Neill yesterday to increase spending on anti-poverty programs globally by $50 billion annually. Brown said the increase - a doubling of all foreign aid - should underwrite a new Marshall Plan to improve education and health for the world's poorest people.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 22, 2004
WASHINGTON - With countries from Bolivia to Bangladesh competing for a rich new flow of foreign aid from the United States, the Bush administration and Congress are moving ahead with a fundamental overhaul of programs to assist developing nations. The new approach - an experiment intended to create competition among applicants, who must demonstrate their worthiness to receive financing - has won support in Congress. But it has already drawn criticism from those who say that some recipients of aid under existing programs may be shortchanged.
NEWS
By SCOTT CALVERT and SCOTT CALVERT,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | February 18, 2006
BIL BIL, Kenya -- Halima Hussein has to walk two miles to fetch water for her family, and for that she is grateful. Until 2002 the women of this village walked eight miles to the murky, crocodile-infested Tana River, then walked eight miles back home with donkeys carrying the water jugs. "From the heart I am very happy," Hussein said, standing in 105-degree heat at an earthen dam, where a hand pump pulls cold water through a gravel purifier. The four-year-old dam is a manmade oasis, now of critical importance because of a drought scorching much of East Africa.
NEWS
October 23, 2011
The recent Republican presidential candidate debate in Las Vegas put a new spotlight on the issue of U.S. spending on foreign aid, although it may have escaped the notice of many ("Republicans take off gloves in Vegas debate," Oct. 19). Times are tough and Americans need to understand why it is vital that we continue to send development aid overseas: It increases jobs here in the U.S. and keeps our homeland safer. My firm is an international development company that employs American workers (and local partners as well)
NEWS
By Jane Perlez and Jane Perlez,New York Times News Service | July 16, 2007
GHALANAI, Pakistan -- The United States plans to pour $750 million of aid into Pakistan's tribal areas over the next five years as part of a "hearts and minds" campaign to win over the lawless region from al-Qaida and Taliban militants. But even before the plan has been fully carried out, documents and officials involved in the planning are warning of the dangers of distributing so much money in an area so hostile that oversight is impossible, even by Pakistan's own government, which faces rising threats from Islamic militants.
NEWS
By SCOTT CALVERT and SCOTT CALVERT,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | February 18, 2006
BIL BIL, Kenya -- Halima Hussein has to walk two miles to fetch water for her family, and for that she is grateful. Until 2002 the women of this village walked eight miles to the murky, crocodile-infested Tana River, then walked eight miles back home with donkeys carrying the water jugs. "From the heart I am very happy," Hussein said, standing in 105-degree heat at an earthen dam, where a hand pump pulls cold water through a gravel purifier. The four-year-old dam is a manmade oasis, now of critical importance because of a drought scorching much of East Africa.
NEWS
June 21, 2005
THIS YEAR has frequently been touted as pivotal for Africa. Stars have aligned to focus global attention on that rich but troubled continent, prompting calls for renewed attempts to make African economies self-sustaining and for redoubled efforts to combat poverty and disease. Rock musicians, evangelists, European leaders and world trade ministers have all signed on to a grand lobbying effort intended to free Africans from debt, boost humanitarian relief and development aid, and drop protectionist barriers to African products.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 22, 2004
WASHINGTON - With countries from Bolivia to Bangladesh competing for a rich new flow of foreign aid from the United States, the Bush administration and Congress are moving ahead with a fundamental overhaul of programs to assist developing nations. The new approach - an experiment intended to create competition among applicants, who must demonstrate their worthiness to receive financing - has won support in Congress. But it has already drawn criticism from those who say that some recipients of aid under existing programs may be shortchanged.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 7, 2003
WASHINGTON -- With Congress set to increase foreign development aid to the world's poorest nations by nearly $2 billion, President Bush is overseeing the biggest increase in development assistance since 1962 -- the year after President John F. Kennedy created the Peace Corps and the Alliance for Progress in South America. With most of that money aimed at combating HIV/AIDS and creating a new development program, Africa would be the main beneficiary of this latest expansion in foreign aid. In a turnaround that caught even Democrats by surprise, Republican lawmakers agreed to nearly double the amount of aid money going to Africa.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 7, 2003
WASHINGTON -- With Congress set to increase foreign development aid to the world's poorest nations by nearly $2 billion, President Bush is overseeing the biggest increase in development assistance since 1962 -- the year after President John F. Kennedy created the Peace Corps and the Alliance for Progress in South America. With most of that money aimed at combating HIV/AIDS and creating a new development program, Africa would be the main beneficiary of this latest expansion in foreign aid. In a turnaround that caught even Democrats by surprise, Republican lawmakers agreed to nearly double the amount of aid money going to Africa.
NEWS
By David Horsey | December 25, 2012
If you want to see where rank hypocrisy sits in full flower, you have only to observe Republicans at their desks in the House and Senate. There, they have been openly ridiculing President Barack Obama's proposed $50 billion stimulus bill for desperately needed infrastructure work. When Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell heard of the president's plan, he derisively laughed out loud, as if he'd been handed a piece of road kill. At about the same time, Bill Shuster, a Pennsylvania Republican who is incoming chairman of the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, baldly declared: There will be no stimulus in any fiscal-cliff budget deal.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 24, 2002
SEOUL, South Korea - The CIA told members of Congress last week that North Korea's uranium-enrichment program, discovered this summer, would produce enough material for weapons in two to three years. The CIA also says North Korea has two weapons that were created before a previous program was halted by the United States in 1994. But the CIA didn't mention how one of the world's poorest and most isolated nations assembled such complex technology. According to officials interviewed in the past three weeks in Washington, Pakistan and Seoul, North Korea managed the feat through a relationship with Pakistan - a series of transactions that now appears much deeper and more dangerous than the United States and its Asian allies first suspected.
NEWS
May 24, 2002
FEW AFRICAN nations can escape occasional droughts. But six countries from Malawi to Zimbabwe have been hit by something far more insidious - killer floods that first wiped out crops, followed by a merciless aridity that has baked the soil hard as rock. Some 5 million people are threatened with starvation. Nature's vagaries are only a partial reason for this unfolding disaster. Zimbabwe, long regarded as the region's bread basket, is a case in point. Drought, combined with President Robert Mugabe's disastrous expulsion of white farmers, has produced a man-made calamity in which the area planted with corn fell by 54 percent in a single year.
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