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BUSINESS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,New York Bureau | April 4, 1993
New York --Long seen as a luxury for harried Wall Street brokers and Hollywood wannabes, the cellular phone is recasting its image as -- of all things -- a vital economic link for developing countries.About 60 countries have gone cellular, including 15 developing countries last year, when new technology and foreign investment pushed cellular phones into Zaire, Laos, Hungary and Bolivia. Today, such phones have become crucial connections between village and capital, remote mine and rescue service.
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NEWS
December 3, 2013
A report this week that American students are lagging behind their top international peers in math, reading and science should give pause to those who argue that the nation's school reform efforts are going too far and too fast. In fact, they suggest just the opposite: The, at best, middling scores of American 15-year-olds not only challenge the notion of American "exceptionalism," they also threaten over time to erode the educational foundations of the world's largest economy and its global political and military influence.
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NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,david.kohn@baltsun.com | October 5, 2008
In 1964, when the U.S. surgeon general's office published the famed report that officially confirmed the link between smoking and cancer, nearly half of American adults smoked. To understand just how smoky life was back then, watch any episode of Mad Men, the TV series set on Madison Avenue in the early 1960s. Without a second thought, almost every character lights up regularly, at the office, at home, in restaurants, bars, cars, even at the dinner table in front of the kids. Happily, those days are over.
NEWS
By Rachel Abbott | November 1, 2013
Climate change is a looming problem that will affect developed and developing countries. Developed nations have historically - and primarily - contributed to this problem, despite the fact that developing nations will be disproportionately affected in coming years. Social and environmental justice issues are inherently linked to climate change. Thus, it is critical to produce behavior change in developed countries and help developing countries adapt to climate change. Part of tackling climate change is understanding why humans harm the environment.
BUSINESS
By David Rohde and David Rohde,The Christian Science Monitor | September 6, 1994
BOSTON -- Adam Smith's invisible hand is caressing Asia, ignoring the former Soviet Union, and slapping Africa.Economic principles put forth by the 18th-century British advocate of capitalism are being accepted wholeheartedly for the first time in decades by most of the world's developing countries: These nations are tearing down barriers to foreign investment.Multinational corporations, now free to invest where they please instead of where they can, invested a record $80 billion in developing countries in 1993, according to the United Nations World Investment Report 1994.
NEWS
By PETER MORICI | July 28, 2006
President Bush earlier this month urged the Group of Eight to recommit to successfully concluding the Doha Round of World Trade Organization negotiations. Now, the United States is being blamed for the talks' collapse last weekend. The final rift among representatives from the United States, the European Union, Australia, Brazil, India and Japan was sparked by the question of agriculture - the same issue that has made the climate of the talks tense from the start. The EU, especially, but also India and Brazil - the coordinators of the Group of 20 developing countries that share common agricultural interests - held the U.S. responsible for the failure of the talks because of its refusal to cut the subsidies shelled out to American farmers.
NEWS
By Laurie Goering and Laurie Goering,Chicago Tribune | December 16, 2007
NUSA DUA, Indonesia -- In a tumultuous final session at international climate talks in which the U.S. delegates were booed, the world's nations committed yesterday to negotiating a new deal by 2009 that would set the world on a course toward halving emissions of heat-trapping gases by 2050. The United States, diplomatically isolated and worried about being blamed for the expected collapse of the talks yesterday, was forced to join the world in agreeing that developing countries should be compensated for pushing ahead to cut their greenhouse gas emissions, a major demand of developing economic giants such as China and India.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 19, 1997
NAHUEL HUAPI NATIONAL PARK, Argentina -- Framed by the Patagonian wilderness, President Carlos Saul Menem of Argentina appeared with President Clinton yesterday to endorse Clinton's call for developing nations to join the effort to restrict gases that contribute to global warming.Clinton is seeking to negotiate limits on emissions for all countries, including developing ones. Many of those countries say that industrialized countries that have benefited most from polluting should bear the costs of addressing it.Menem said, "We agree with the United States when you say that a global problem such as climate change requires a global answer, coming from all countries."
NEWS
February 17, 1992
The World Health Organization has some good news about drug use: World-wide consumption of morphine more than tripled during the 1980s, rising from 2,345 kilos in 1980 to 7,206 kilos in 1990.That's good news? Yes, because it indicates that many more of the 51 million people who die of cancer each year are getting the only care that can make much difference -- relief from pain. This is especially important in developing countries, which record 40 million cancer deaths each year. In many cases, the disease is not diagnosed until it is so far advanced that little can be done even if adequate medical facilities are available.
NEWS
June 9, 1996
ISTANBUL IS a perfect location for the second United Nations conference on human settlements. Not because of its breathtaking views or its rich history. But because this Turkish city of 10 million people keeps growing by about 400,000 each year. Istanbul, in brief, is a case study in the rapid and uncontrolled urbanization that is evidenced in many countries, particularly in the Third World.The current tidal wave of urbanization is so huge that if U.N. estimates are correct, half the world will be living in cities by the year 2000.
NEWS
By Ruth A. Karron and Ruth R. Faden | August 17, 2009
As the nation prepares for the return of the H1N1 influenza pandemic, public health officials are faced with difficult choices. While some doses of the vaccine for what is known as "swine flu" will be ready by October, the entire supply will not be available for several more months. Recently, two landmark meetings have been convened to discuss plans for the evaluation and use of vaccines against H1N1. On July 23rd, the Vaccine and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee (VRBPAC)
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | February 3, 2009
Dr. Michael A. Koenig, an international expert in partner violence and child abuse in developing countries, died of cancer Jan. 27 at his Roland Park home. He was 56. Born and raised in Ishpeming, Mich., he earned a bachelor's degree from Colgate University in 1974. In 1976, he earned a master's degree in sociology from the University of Michigan, and he earned a doctorate in population planning in 1981, also from the University of Michigan School of Graduate Studies. From 1981 to 1983, he was a postdoctoral fellow in population dynamics at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, where he completed a series of studies on adolescent pregnancy and contraceptive use in the United States.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,david.kohn@baltsun.com | October 5, 2008
In 1964, when the U.S. surgeon general's office published the famed report that officially confirmed the link between smoking and cancer, nearly half of American adults smoked. To understand just how smoky life was back then, watch any episode of Mad Men, the TV series set on Madison Avenue in the early 1960s. Without a second thought, almost every character lights up regularly, at the office, at home, in restaurants, bars, cars, even at the dinner table in front of the kids. Happily, those days are over.
NEWS
By Laurie Goering and Laurie Goering,Chicago Tribune | December 16, 2007
NUSA DUA, Indonesia -- In a tumultuous final session at international climate talks in which the U.S. delegates were booed, the world's nations committed yesterday to negotiating a new deal by 2009 that would set the world on a course toward halving emissions of heat-trapping gases by 2050. The United States, diplomatically isolated and worried about being blamed for the expected collapse of the talks yesterday, was forced to join the world in agreeing that developing countries should be compensated for pushing ahead to cut their greenhouse gas emissions, a major demand of developing economic giants such as China and India.
NEWS
By James Gerstenzang and James Gerstenzang,Los Angeles Times | June 7, 2007
Rostock, Germany -- President Bush presented himself yesterday as caught in the middle of the international climate debate, fending off allies' calls for specific steps to reverse global warming while encouraging major developing nations to join eventual climate negotiations. The dispute over how to wrestle with the changing climate is emerging as a focal point of the annual Group of Eight summit that began last night in Heiligendamm, a seaside resort village 14 miles northwest of here on the Baltic Sea. The gathering has drawn tens of thousands of protesters to this northeastern corner of Germany.
NEWS
By PETER MORICI | July 28, 2006
President Bush earlier this month urged the Group of Eight to recommit to successfully concluding the Doha Round of World Trade Organization negotiations. Now, the United States is being blamed for the talks' collapse last weekend. The final rift among representatives from the United States, the European Union, Australia, Brazil, India and Japan was sparked by the question of agriculture - the same issue that has made the climate of the talks tense from the start. The EU, especially, but also India and Brazil - the coordinators of the Group of 20 developing countries that share common agricultural interests - held the U.S. responsible for the failure of the talks because of its refusal to cut the subsidies shelled out to American farmers.
NEWS
By Jane Williams | September 16, 2005
THE FIRST real sign of the end of summer arrived when students, me included, zipped up their backpacks, organized their folders and headed back to school. For some, this year marks the beginning of a new chapter in their lives - the end of elementary school and the beginning of the dreaded middle school. For some, this year will be their first, for others, their 12th. But for more than 100 million children around the globe, this school year does not exist. Whether it is because they must work all day to bring money home to their families, because the schoolhouse is too far from home or simply because a schoolhouse does not exist, over 100 million children ages 6 to 12 are not enrolled in school.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 2, 1997
KYOTO, Japan -- A conference that is supposed to cap more than two years of negotiations on what to do about global warming opened yesterday amid widespread concern that too many hard issues remained to allow the completion of an effective agreement.Melinda Kimble, a senior State Department official who is leading the U.S. delegation in Kyoto, hinted at some flexibility in the American position on setting targets for reducing gases that trap heat in the atmosphere.Scientists advising the negotiators say that if emissions are not reduced, the average global surface temperature will rise by 2 to 6 degrees Fahrenheit over the next century.
NEWS
May 15, 2006
It has pledges from 180 industrialized nations, but the effort to provide free universal primary education for all children in the developing world by 2015, which is part of the United Nations Millennium Project, is still short on a key ingredient: money. Last month, the United Kingdom pledged $1.5 billion a year for the next 10 years to the cause. The United States, which has an economy six times as large as that of the U.K., is way behind. It's time for America to step up and pay more of its fair share.
BUSINESS
By JAMIE SMITH HOPKINS and JAMIE SMITH HOPKINS,SUN REPORTER | January 19, 2006
Ingrid B. Smith was a connoisseur of low-paying jobs - baby-sitting, ice cream vending, fast-food slinging -before taking a better position: CEO. The cleaning company that she and husband, Larry A. Smith, started is still in business after four years, and the East Baltimore residents say needed loans are a big part of the reason. Tiny loans: $1,500 to buy equipment; $3,000, more recently, to help them expand. Though such "microfinancing" is better known as an effort to put sewing machines and other inexpensive business tools into the hands of villagers in the developing world, advocates think it's an equally good strategy for struggling Americans trying to improve their lives.
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