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NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | June 28, 2002
State officials have granted Baltimore County a 90-day extension to find a home for its first detoxification center for teen-agers, a decision that allows the county to hold onto a $450,000 grant it was ready to return to the state. Peter F. Luongo, director of the Maryland Alcohol and Drug Abuse Administration, sent the county a letter yesterday saying that it has until Sept. 30 to find a site or lose the money. County administrators said earlier this week they would forfeit the grant Sunday, the end of the fiscal year.
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NEWS
July 20, 2006
Closing detox center shuts a door to help The decision by Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center to expand services to methadone maintenance patients is to be applauded ("Bayview closes its drug detox center," July 12). Funding these services by eliminating the detoxification program is a tragic mistake. Addiction is a chronic, relapsing condition, and permanent abstinence clearly will not be achieved by a 10-day to 14-day period of detoxification. But even a brief respite from the compulsive need to use opiates can mean the difference between life and death and, when provided to large numbers of patients, will yield substantial benefits to the community as a whole as well.
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NEWS
October 7, 1994
The United Way of Central Maryland voted yesterday to give a $35,000 grant to the former hospital ship Sanctuary, a decommissioned Navy vessel that may be resurrected as a drug and alcohol rehabilitation center.The 562-foot Sanctuary, which saw extensive duty during the Vietnam War, is owned by Project Life. The local nonprofit organization hopes to have a 100-bed detoxification unit on board by June of next year.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | August 4, 2003
At Hope House, you can't watch TV in the room you share, and nearly all of your waking hours are scheduled. You have to do chores and your own laundry. And caffeinated drinks and foods are off-limits. The list goes on - a strict regimen for a clientele typically known to ignore responsibilities and restrictions. But there's always a clamor to get into Hope House, an alcohol and drug rehabilitation center on the grounds of Crownsville Hospital Center. The nonprofit center is the only one in Anne Arundel County that provides three progressive levels of residential addiction treatment - in-patient detoxification, intermediate follow-up treatment and therapy and extended care and integration into the community.
NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Staff Writer | February 5, 1993
North Arundel Hospital announced yesterday it will close its 12-bed chemical dependency unit this June, leaving Anne Arundel County without a facility where people can kick their drug habits in a hospital setting.Hospital spokesman Kevin Murnane said officials at the Glen Burnie hospital could no longer justify the financial drain caused by the unit -- particularly in light of new state regulations making it harder to get Medicaid reimbursement for patients going through detoxification.It costs about $800 a day to treat a patient in the unit, he said, and this year the hospital will not receive payment for almost 80 percent of those patients.
NEWS
By Michael K. Burns | September 11, 1991
An article in yesterday's editions of The Sun inadvertently suggested that Mass Transit Administration subway drivers had failed random drug tests. The MTA says none of its 88 subway drivers has ever tested positive for drug use.The Sun regrets the error.Twenty-six state Mass Transit Administration drivers and mechanics who failed random drug tests will get their jobs back if they remain drug-free for a year and complete rehabilitation programs, an arbitrator has ruled.While arbitrator Richard Bloch upheld MTA's right to continue the 20-month program of random drug testing, he agreed with the Transit Union's position that automatic firing of first-time violators was too severe.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | December 21, 2000
Anne Arundel County will expand substance abuse treatment programs to about 400 residents who now can't afford it, local Health Department officials said yesterday in announcing a $1 million state grant. "This is a good day, it's a day for changing lives," Health Officer Frances B. Phillips said shortly after the county received the gift-wrapped check during a briefing in Crownsville. "Substance abuse touches every family in this county." About 24,000 county residents need substance abuse treatment, but one-fourth have received such services, the department estimates.
NEWS
November 14, 1990
It is a truism that sooner is better than later in matters of child care. Whether you're talking special classes for 4-year-olds or nutrition programs for new mothers and infants, experts agree it's far easier to head off a problem before it develops than try to RTC reverse its consequences down the line.That's particularly true in the area of prenatal care for expectant mothers. As reported in The Evening Sun on Monday, the John Hopkins Health Plan, in fact, is so convinced of the virtues of prevention that it is adopting a policy of paying at-risk pregnant women to come in for regular checkups and attend health education classes.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff writer | October 28, 1990
WESTMINSTER - The eight pairs of ears in the lounge of the Shoemaker Detoxification Center have heard it a thousand times: Drugs and alcohol are bad for you.But these eight people seem to listen more closely with acupuncture pins stuck in their ears.That's how Bruce Marshall uses one ancient medicine to open up patients to another age-old therapy -- common sense.Patients say Marshall's approach helps them realize how much damage they had been inflicting on their bodies."(Acupuncture) more or less opens your mind to a lot of thinking.
NEWS
July 20, 2006
Closing detox center shuts a door to help The decision by Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center to expand services to methadone maintenance patients is to be applauded ("Bayview closes its drug detox center," July 12). Funding these services by eliminating the detoxification program is a tragic mistake. Addiction is a chronic, relapsing condition, and permanent abstinence clearly will not be achieved by a 10-day to 14-day period of detoxification. But even a brief respite from the compulsive need to use opiates can mean the difference between life and death and, when provided to large numbers of patients, will yield substantial benefits to the community as a whole as well.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | June 28, 2002
State officials have granted Baltimore County a 90-day extension to find a home for its first detoxification center for teen-agers, a decision that allows the county to hold onto a $450,000 grant it was ready to return to the state. Peter F. Luongo, director of the Maryland Alcohol and Drug Abuse Administration, sent the county a letter yesterday saying that it has until Sept. 30 to find a site or lose the money. County administrators said earlier this week they would forfeit the grant Sunday, the end of the fiscal year.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | December 21, 2000
Anne Arundel County will expand substance abuse treatment programs to about 400 residents who now can't afford it, local Health Department officials said yesterday in announcing a $1 million state grant. "This is a good day, it's a day for changing lives," Health Officer Frances B. Phillips said shortly after the county received the gift-wrapped check during a briefing in Crownsville. "Substance abuse touches every family in this county." About 24,000 county residents need substance abuse treatment, but one-fourth have received such services, the department estimates.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | December 3, 1998
One of Howard County's top addictions specialists went before the Kings Contrivance Village Board last night to answer questions about a proposed heroin detoxification program that could treat as many as 70 addicts a week from a mobile unit near the village center.Frank McGloin, program director for the county Bureau of Mental Health and Addictions in Columbia, told Kings Contrivance officials that heroin use is on the rise in Howard County -- particularly among ages 18 to 25. He outlined the details of a program he hopes will help substance abusers get clean of drugs and steer clear of crime.
NEWS
October 7, 1994
The United Way of Central Maryland voted yesterday to give a $35,000 grant to the former hospital ship Sanctuary, a decommissioned Navy vessel that may be resurrected as a drug and alcohol rehabilitation center.The 562-foot Sanctuary, which saw extensive duty during the Vietnam War, is owned by Project Life. The local nonprofit organization hopes to have a 100-bed detoxification unit on board by June of next year.
NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Staff Writer | February 5, 1993
North Arundel Hospital announced yesterday it will close its 12-bed chemical dependency unit this June, leaving Anne Arundel County without a facility where people can kick their drug habits in a hospital setting.Hospital spokesman Kevin Murnane said officials at the Glen Burnie hospital could no longer justify the financial drain caused by the unit -- particularly in light of new state regulations making it harder to get Medicaid reimbursement for patients going through detoxification.It costs about $800 a day to treat a patient in the unit, he said, and this year the hospital will not receive payment for almost 80 percent of those patients.
NEWS
By Michael K. Burns | September 11, 1991
An article in yesterday's editions of The Sun inadvertently suggested that Mass Transit Administration subway drivers had failed random drug tests. The MTA says none of its 88 subway drivers has ever tested positive for drug use.The Sun regrets the error.Twenty-six state Mass Transit Administration drivers and mechanics who failed random drug tests will get their jobs back if they remain drug-free for a year and complete rehabilitation programs, an arbitrator has ruled.While arbitrator Richard Bloch upheld MTA's right to continue the 20-month program of random drug testing, he agreed with the Transit Union's position that automatic firing of first-time violators was too severe.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | August 4, 2003
At Hope House, you can't watch TV in the room you share, and nearly all of your waking hours are scheduled. You have to do chores and your own laundry. And caffeinated drinks and foods are off-limits. The list goes on - a strict regimen for a clientele typically known to ignore responsibilities and restrictions. But there's always a clamor to get into Hope House, an alcohol and drug rehabilitation center on the grounds of Crownsville Hospital Center. The nonprofit center is the only one in Anne Arundel County that provides three progressive levels of residential addiction treatment - in-patient detoxification, intermediate follow-up treatment and therapy and extended care and integration into the community.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Evening Sun Staff | March 28, 1991
A well-used drug- and alcohol-detoxification center in Baltimore, slated to close because of budget problems, has received a last-minute financial reprieve from the state and is to remain open.Only days before a planned shutdown, the Baltimore Recovery Center in the 1800 block of N. Gay St. yesterday received an emergency grant of more than $100,000 from the state health department, enough to keep it open at least through June 30, the end of the fiscal year.The 20-bed unit provides detoxification services for drug and alcohol addicts, many of whom are either homeless or indigent.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Evening Sun Staff | March 28, 1991
A well-used drug- and alcohol-detoxification center in Baltimore, slated to close because of budget problems, has received a last-minute financial reprieve from the state and is to remain open.Only days before a planned shutdown, the Baltimore Recovery Center in the 1800 block of N. Gay St. yesterday received an emergency grant of more than $100,000 from the state health department, enough to keep it open at least through June 30, the end of the fiscal year.The 20-bed unit provides detoxification services for drug and alcohol addicts, many of whom are either homeless or indigent.
NEWS
November 14, 1990
It is a truism that sooner is better than later in matters of child care. Whether you're talking special classes for 4-year-olds or nutrition programs for new mothers and infants, experts agree it's far easier to head off a problem before it develops than try to RTC reverse its consequences down the line.That's particularly true in the area of prenatal care for expectant mothers. As reported in The Evening Sun on Monday, the John Hopkins Health Plan, in fact, is so convinced of the virtues of prevention that it is adopting a policy of paying at-risk pregnant women to come in for regular checkups and attend health education classes.
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