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By Anne Whitehouse | January 27, 1991
DOCTOR SLEEP.Madison Smartt Bell.Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.290 pages. $19.95. Madison Smartt Bell's eighth work of fiction is a wonderfully inventive novel in the genre of the hard-boiled detective story, with metaphysical overtones. The protagonist, Adrian Strother, is young American hypnotist living in London, who suffers from insomnia and is unable or unwilling to cure himself. He has a painful, hidden past, a troubled present and an uncertain future.As a hypnotist, Adrian is a detective of the mind.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2013
Baltimore's Edgar Allan Poe House and Museum should reopen Oct. 4, the group responsible for making it profitable announced this week. "That's the official goal. That's the date," said Baltimore-based actor and author Mark Redfield, vice president of Poe Baltimore. "Things are coming along. " Tentative plans call for the house to be open weekends until spring 2014, when hours would be expanded. Final details are still being developed, Redfield said, but plans call for a museum that will be similar to what had been available to visitors before the closing of the house in September 2012.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By dave rosenthal and nancy johnston and dave rosenthal and nancy johnston,dave.rosenthal@baltsun.com and nancy.johnston@baltsun.com | January 18, 2009
Happy birthday, Edgar! Tomorrow is the 200th anniversary of the birth of Edgar Allan Poe, the great writer who for a time called Baltimore home. He was a true genius. Some call him America's first literary critic. Some say he wrote the first detective story (and established sleuthing characteristics made famous by Sherlock Holmes). Some credit him with creating the horror genre. We asked authors, scholars and others to describe Poe's influence on them - and on the world. What was the source of his genius?
ENTERTAINMENT
By dave rosenthal and nancy johnston and dave rosenthal and nancy johnston,dave.rosenthal@baltsun.com and nancy.johnston@baltsun.com | January 18, 2009
Happy birthday, Edgar! Tomorrow is the 200th anniversary of the birth of Edgar Allan Poe, the great writer who for a time called Baltimore home. He was a true genius. Some call him America's first literary critic. Some say he wrote the first detective story (and established sleuthing characteristics made famous by Sherlock Holmes). Some credit him with creating the horror genre. We asked authors, scholars and others to describe Poe's influence on them - and on the world. What was the source of his genius?
NEWS
December 14, 1992
Dr. LeRoy L. Panek, Western Maryland College's dean of planning and research, will relinquish that position to become director of corporate and foundation relations in the college's Office of Development on Jan. 1.Dr. Panek, a 24-year employee of Western Maryland as an educator and administrator, will coordinate Western Maryland's expanding effort to enlist support from corporations, foundations and public granting agencies.He will report to Stevenson W. Close Jr., associate vice president and director of development.
FEATURES
By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Evening Sun Staff | October 3, 1991
Changing from the kind-hearted Dr. Jekyll into the nefarious Mr. Hyde is a suspense-filled five-minute transition for actor Mark Redfield, who is starring in and directing his own adaptation of Robert Louis Stevenson's terrifying classic, "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde."The violent tale of foul and murderous deeds that emerge from the dark side of the soul is opening tomorrow at the Spotlighters Theatre for a three-week run. Written in 1886 and set in the shroudlike fog of London nights, Stevenson's novella has come down through the years as the ultimate psychological thriller.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | February 25, 1995
If you have HBO, tonight you'll have no complaints. The premiere of the latest HBO docudrama, "Citizen X," is a $l wonderful detective story -- and a highly unusual one, since it's about the search for a serial killer within the Soviet Union. However, if you don't have HBO, tonight in prime time you have ABC's "The Marshal," and a network telecast of "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn," and not much else.* "The Adventures of Huck Finn." (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- It was a dead giveaway that this 1993 movie wasn't going to be exceptionally faithful to Mark Twain's masterpiece when it couldn't even get the title right.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2013
Baltimore's Edgar Allan Poe House and Museum should reopen Oct. 4, the group responsible for making it profitable announced this week. "That's the official goal. That's the date," said Baltimore-based actor and author Mark Redfield, vice president of Poe Baltimore. "Things are coming along. " Tentative plans call for the house to be open weekends until spring 2014, when hours would be expanded. Final details are still being developed, Redfield said, but plans call for a museum that will be similar to what had been available to visitors before the closing of the house in September 2012.
ENTERTAINMENT
By JOAN MELLEN and JOAN MELLEN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 6, 1999
Four outstanding story collections grace the June list, a decided trend. In "Someone to Watch Over Me" (HarperFlamingo, 224 pages, $24) Richard Bausch's people are ordinary, less than appealing, and often asthmatic. In "Not Quite Final," the young wife, her elderly husband and her younger parents reflexively bicker, jabbing through generational wars.There is an overabundance of ex-husbands and ex-wives, all lacking the imagination to see beyond their own wearying needs; most Bausch characters compulsively spoil whatever is good in their lives.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | May 3, 2003
History Detectives are at work in the Poe Room of the Enoch Pratt Central Library. Edgar Allan Poe, the inventor of the detective story, seems bemused looking down from a portrait over the mantel at the TV crew scuttling around the room below. History Detectives is a new PBS show that has sent out teams of architects, antiquarians and historians to uncover "the history hidden on America's doorstep." It's a 10-episode series set to begin on July 14, with three historical mysteries to be "solved" per episode.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | May 3, 2003
History Detectives are at work in the Poe Room of the Enoch Pratt Central Library. Edgar Allan Poe, the inventor of the detective story, seems bemused looking down from a portrait over the mantel at the TV crew scuttling around the room below. History Detectives is a new PBS show that has sent out teams of architects, antiquarians and historians to uncover "the history hidden on America's doorstep." It's a 10-episode series set to begin on July 14, with three historical mysteries to be "solved" per episode.
NEWS
By Kirk Johnson and Kirk Johnson,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 9, 2001
HUDSON FALLS, N.Y. - For decades, the crumbling limestone walls of the old Allen Mill concealed a secret. Deep inside, a 150-year-old tunnel and a long-forgotten wooden gate that were part of the mill's early Industrial Era water-power system on the upper Hudson River were slowly rotting away. Finally, in 1991, the gate failed. A reservoir that had built up in the tunnel - a foul stew of PCBs, solvents and oils that had seeped through the porous shale bedrock from the General Electric capacitor factory just up the riverbank - surged into the Hudson.
ENTERTAINMENT
By JOAN MELLEN and JOAN MELLEN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 6, 1999
Four outstanding story collections grace the June list, a decided trend. In "Someone to Watch Over Me" (HarperFlamingo, 224 pages, $24) Richard Bausch's people are ordinary, less than appealing, and often asthmatic. In "Not Quite Final," the young wife, her elderly husband and her younger parents reflexively bicker, jabbing through generational wars.There is an overabundance of ex-husbands and ex-wives, all lacking the imagination to see beyond their own wearying needs; most Bausch characters compulsively spoil whatever is good in their lives.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 1, 1995
It's early to tell, of course, but it looks as though director Carl Franklin has yet to make even one false move.Here he is at 46, just about to go big-time with a $22 million studio film ("Devil in a Blue Dress") with an authentic movie star (Denzel Washington), all based on a book by President Clinton's favorite mystery writer (Walter Mosley). It's enough to take your breath away, but it doesn't seem to have taken his away. He's worked too hard.Franklin achieved a kind of cult reputation in 1991 with "One False Move," a tough, bitter little thriller that completely transcended both its genre and its director's identity as an African-American.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Staff Writer | August 25, 1995
"A Pure Formality" is like a joke that takes way, way too long to tell. Halfway to the punch line, you've pretty much lost interest.The movie, opening today at the Charles, stars Gerard Depardieu's massive gut, Roman Polanski's sneer and the most driving rainstorm since Noah. It starts off promisingly enough, with a revolver shot aimed directly at the audience and an exhausted, lost and drenched -- the temptation to say this film is all wet is almost irresistible -- Depardieu being picked up by police on an isolated country road.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Sun Staff Writer | July 6, 1995
Detectives were setting up surveillance operations at a North Carolina hotel -- hoping to snare slaying suspect Daniel Scott Harney -- when he pulled into the parking lot in the car that police say struck and dragged his estranged wife outside her Ellicott City home.The investigators encircled Mr. Harney, whisked his two young sons away and placed him under arrest for the Dec. 26 slaying of Shirley Scott Harney, a detective testified at a Howard Circuit Court hearing yesterday.As he lay on the ground in handcuffs outside the Charlotte hotel, Mr. Harney directed police to a handgun under the driver's seat of his silver Toyota Camry, the officer said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Staff Writer | August 25, 1995
"A Pure Formality" is like a joke that takes way, way too long to tell. Halfway to the punch line, you've pretty much lost interest.The movie, opening today at the Charles, stars Gerard Depardieu's massive gut, Roman Polanski's sneer and the most driving rainstorm since Noah. It starts off promisingly enough, with a revolver shot aimed directly at the audience and an exhausted, lost and drenched -- the temptation to say this film is all wet is almost irresistible -- Depardieu being picked up by police on an isolated country road.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Sun Staff Writer | July 6, 1995
Detectives were setting up surveillance operations at a North Carolina hotel -- hoping to snare slaying suspect Daniel Scott Harney -- when he pulled into the parking lot in the car that police say struck and dragged his estranged wife outside her Ellicott City home.The investigators encircled Mr. Harney, whisked his two young sons away and placed him under arrest for the Dec. 26 slaying of Shirley Scott Harney, a detective testified at a Howard Circuit Court hearing yesterday.As he lay on the ground in handcuffs outside the Charlotte hotel, Mr. Harney directed police to a handgun under the driver's seat of his silver Toyota Camry, the officer said.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | February 25, 1995
If you have HBO, tonight you'll have no complaints. The premiere of the latest HBO docudrama, "Citizen X," is a $l wonderful detective story -- and a highly unusual one, since it's about the search for a serial killer within the Soviet Union. However, if you don't have HBO, tonight in prime time you have ABC's "The Marshal," and a network telecast of "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn," and not much else.* "The Adventures of Huck Finn." (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- It was a dead giveaway that this 1993 movie wasn't going to be exceptionally faithful to Mark Twain's masterpiece when it couldn't even get the title right.
NEWS
December 14, 1992
Dr. LeRoy L. Panek, Western Maryland College's dean of planning and research, will relinquish that position to become director of corporate and foundation relations in the college's Office of Development on Jan. 1.Dr. Panek, a 24-year employee of Western Maryland as an educator and administrator, will coordinate Western Maryland's expanding effort to enlist support from corporations, foundations and public granting agencies.He will report to Stevenson W. Close Jr., associate vice president and director of development.
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