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By Justin George and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2014
Baltimore police will soon install a gunshot detection system in east and west Baltimore, under a $305,000 state grant that won city approval Wednesday. The ShotSpotter system will use receivers posted in neighborhoods to detect the sound of gunfire. Police will use the readings to track and respond to potential shootings. Similar systems are used throughout the United States, including in cities such as Oakland, Calif., and Washington. "These efforts will enable law enforcement to better locate gun offenders and pinpoint locations of the related activity," Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
A man was shot in the elbow in Northeast Baltimore on Thursday night, according to Baltimore Police. Officers responded to the 2900 block of Southern Avenue in the city's Lauraville neighborhood about 9:47 p.m. and found the injured man, police said. The man was transported to a nearby hospital for emergency care, police said. His injuries were not considered life-threatening late Thursday, police said. Anyone with information about the incident is asked to call police at 410-396-2444.
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NEWS
December 1, 2009
The federal government has chosen a 2,000-acre Eastern Shore farm as the preferred location of a new State Department campus for training diplomats and security personnel. The Queen Anne's County property, near Routes 304 and 481, was one of several potential sites under study in Virginia, West Virginia and Maryland, including one close to Hagerstown. A public hearing on construction of the planned Foreign Affairs Security Training Center, which would include shooting ranges, a terrorist avoidance driving school, munitions detection and language instruction, is expected to be held later this month.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
Baltimore police were investigating a double shooting Monday night just before 10 p.m. in the west side neighborhood of Edgeview. Police found an adult man with a gunshot wound to his head in the front of the house at 776 Linnard St. The man was treated at a local hospital and pronounced dead at 11:37 p.m. A woman, who walked into the house during the shooting, was shot in the stomach. She has been released from the hospital where she was taken. mmccauley@baltsun.com
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,justin.fenton@baltsun.com | October 21, 2009
A year after the Johns Hopkins University implemented an electronic gunshot detection system around its campus, Baltimore police are trying out the technology in an area where it is likely to be more regularly put to use. Sheryl Goldstein, director of the Mayor's Office on Criminal Justice, confirmed that police have recently begun testing a single gunshot sensor in East Baltimore. Dispatchers have been overheard on a city police scanner recently alerting officers to possible gunshot detections along the high-crime Monument Street corridor, though the precise location of the sensor is unclear.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2010
The state plans to award a contract for up to $20.9 million as it prepares to expand a program that issues tickets to drivers caught on camera speeding in highway work zones. The equipment and management services award to ACS State & Local Solutions Inc. of Germantown, which holds the contract for the existing program, is scheduled to go to the Board of Public Works for approval next week. The contract would permit the state to expand the work zone enforcement program that was authorized by the General Assembly last year.
NEWS
April 22, 2014
I am responding to the letter from Dr. Andy Lazris entitled "Screening for Alzheimer's carries its own risks," (April 17). The Alzheimer's Association supports efforts that increase early detection and diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease by trained professionals in a medical setting after a comprehensive evaluation. Today more than 5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer's disease. With an aging baby boomer population, that number is expected to soar to as many as 16 million by mid-century.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton | justin.fenton@baltsun.com | February 18, 2010
The death of a 45-year-old woman, initially reported Tuesday as a traffic accident, is being investigated by homicide detectives after witnesses told police that the woman was seen fighting with her boyfriend moments before she was struck by a truck. The woman, who has not been identified, was struck about 1:15 p.m. in the 2400 block of Greenmount Ave. and was pronounced dead at about 4:30 p.m. Police confirmed Wednesday that witnesses said the woman had been seen assaulting her boyfriend, striking him numerous times in the face, before "falling backwards into the street and in front of a moving vehicle," according to Anthony Guglielmi, a police spokesman.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2012
Jon J. Grow, a former Baltimore police detective who became a nationally recognized bunco expert and co-founded and served as executive director of the National Association of Bunco Investigators, died Sunday of pancreatic cancer at his Parkton home. He was 70. The word "bunco" is derived from the Spanish word for banking and means a swindling game. Mr. Grow's work targeted the con artists, swindlers, pickpockets and confidence men and women who preyed primarily on the elderly and trusting.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | February 16, 1995
A gene blamed for many human cancers may someday guide surgeons who want to make sure they have rid their patients of disease and haven't left any malignant cells behind, doctors from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine said today.Until now, the fast-growing science of cancer genetics has provided scientists with hope of identifying people who are predisposed to deadly cancers -- such as those of the breast and colon -- so doctors and patients can watch for the first suspicious signs.An article published in today's New England Journal of Medicine presents an additional possibility: that genetic "probes" can do a better job than microscopes of finding residual cancer cells in tissues bordering visible tumors.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
A Baltimore Police officer who became a prosecution witness against other officers convicted of misconduct is leaving the department amid an investigation of his own conduct, his attorney confirmed. Det. Joseph Crystal, who said he found a rat on the windshield of his car in November 2012 after he cooperated with prosecutors, is resigning because he continues "to feel uncomfortable and unsafe," according to his attorney, Nick Panteleakis.  The move also comes as he is being investigated for an off-duty car accident in Baltimore County involving a take-home department vehicle.
NEWS
By Anne Colt Leitess | August 19, 2014
Editor's note: This article has been updated from an earlier version Criminal trials typically end once the jury returns its verdict. The attorneys move on to their next cases, unless appeal is pursued, and the debate ends. Unfortunately, that has not been the case after the recent trial of State v. Joseph Walker in Anne Arundel County. An Anne Arundel County grand jury indicted the defendant in this case for murder and other offenses after a Maryland State Police investigation revealed strong evidence that the defendant shot and killed an unarmed man during a road rage incident.
NEWS
Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2014
A voracious Asian beetle that's killed millions of ash trees across North America has finally been spotted in Baltimore, posing a costly and difficult challenge for a city that stands to lose more than 200,000 of its most common trees to the exotic pest's onslaught. It could denude blocks lined with ash and cost the city millions of dollars to remove dead or dying trees from public lands, while homeowners may be forced to pay hundreds or even thousands to treat or replace their vulnerable trees.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2014
Baltimore Police were investigating a shooting in the Oliver neighborhood late Saturday night. A man was reported to be shot on the 1300 block of E. Lafayette Ave. shortly before 11 p.m., according to police. Homicide detectives were called to the scene. No further information was available late Saturday. alisonk@baltsun.com twitter.com/aliknez
NEWS
July 5, 2014
Two people were killed, and another man took his own life in a murder-suicide, over the Fourth of July weekend that also marked the city's 100th homicide of the year. The city's 100th homicide victim was shot multiple times in the head in Baltimore's Forest Park neighborhood Friday evening, police said. Matthew Drake, 34, was shot in the 3200 block of Chelsea Terrace in Forest Park. Drake was pronounced dead on the scene. Police had no suspects and did not offer a potential motive.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2014
Baltimore City homicide detectives are looking for information about a shooting that was reported late Saturday in the Pigtown section of southwest Baltimore. About 11:45 p.m., police found a man with gunshot wounds to his chest and stomach. The victim was taken to an area hospital where he died of his injuries. Police did not identify the victim or provide any details about a motive or a suspect. Anyone with information is asked to call detectives at 410-396-2100. meredith.cohn@baltsun.com
NEWS
March 8, 2000
Visit these Web sites to find the answers, then go to http://www.4Kids.org/ detectives/ * How much of our oxygen comes from ocean algae? * How many segments make up the spinal cord? * Like other creatures, what do microbes require to live? MICROBE PROBE From school playgrounds to frozen snowfields, microbes are everywhere. Discover this microscopic world at the Microbe Zoo. Head to http://commtechlab.msu.edu/sites/dlc-me/zoo/ and prepare to think small. At Animal Pavilion, you'll find out how the microbes that live inside a termite's guts are able to digest wood.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | June 26, 2014
Many supposedly bee-friendly flowers and home garden plants being sold by major retailers have been pretreated with pesticides implicated in bee declines, according to a study by Friends of the Earth and other organizations, including the Maryland Pesticide Network . The study found that 36 out of 71 plant samples - 51 percent - bought at top garden retailers in 18 metro areas across North America - including 1 in 4 plants from...
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2014
Michael Pecht feels like Sherlock Holmes sometimes, and not just because he plays violin on the side. He's a reliability engineer by trade. He runs a 120-person team at the University of Maryland, where the workload includes digging into the mystery of why complex electronics don't work properly. "We get some new problem all the time," he said. "It's just really fascinating. " Pecht, who founded the Center for Advanced Life Cycle Engineering in 1986 and has run it since, was a consultant to Congress during the investigation of reports of sudden acceleration in Toyota vehicles, and more recently for the General Motors ignition-switch recall.
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