Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDetainees
IN THE NEWS

Detainees

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 4, 2010
- The Department of Justice identified Wednesday the additional political appointees who have done prior legal work on behalf of captives in the war on terror, after GOP lawmakers accused the Obama administration of stacking the department with top officials sympathetic to enemy combatants. Matthew Miller, a senior spokesman at the Justice Department, said the names were not released before because "we will not participate in an attempt to drag people's names through the mud for political purposes."
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
Johns Hopkins University will host a former North Korean detainee, the hiker whose accident was adapted into the movie "127 Hours," and actors from "Breaking Bad" and "The Office," among several other speakers this fall. The university's annual Milton S. Eisenhower Symposium will feature journalist Laura Ling, who was detained in North Korea in 2009; former National Security Adviser Thomas Donilon; hiker Aron Ralston; RJ Mitte, who played Flynn on "Breaking Bad"; and B.J. Novak, who played Ryan on "The Office.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2012
Youths detained at the Baltimore City Detention Center were moved over the weekend into a building that has air conditioning, state officials confirmed. The move comes amid increasing concerns over conditions for juveniles charged as adults at the city jail. While state officials who oversee the facility said it was planned as part of renovations at an annex building where juveniles were held, they also said those plans were accelerated based on what was best for the youths. The living quarters will continue to be a dorm-style arrangement in a 50-bed housing unit in the Wyatt Building, formerly used for an adult drug treatment program.
NEWS
By Emad Hassan | July 15, 2014
I have been locked up at Guantanamo Bay for 12 years, held without charge or trial. I've done nothing wrong; in 2009, I was unanimously cleared for release by six different branches of the U.S. government, including the FBI and the CIA. Yet here I am, still detained. I write this 106 years after the birth of Thurgood Marshall, a Baltimore-born civil rights lawyer and later a Supreme Court justice who helped end segregation in America. Marshall understood and respected the humanity and innate equality of all people.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | August 30, 1991
TALLADEGA, Ala. -- For the first time in nine days, the 148detainees, hostages and inmates at the Talladega federal prison ate a full meal yesterday morning, and doctors examined all nine remaining hostages and several detainees.Warden Roger Scott said that each person inside the prison's maximum security Alpha dorm had hamburger, rice, beans, bread and coffee.He said the Cuban detainees had not asked for food until yesterday. After the meal, prison doctors treated at least one detainee suffering from diabetes and the nine hostages.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | June 14, 2007
London -- Britain's highest court sent a stern message to the country's military yesterday, ruling that detainees held in British facilities throughout the world are protected under both the European Convention on Human Rights and British laws. The House of Lords upheld an appeal by the father of Baha Mousa, a 26-year-old detainee in Iraq who died in British custody in 2003. Mousa suffered 93 injuries, including broken ribs and a broken nose, according to lawyers for his family. But the lords, who act as the nation's high court, dismissed the cases of five other Iraqi civilians killed by British troops because the deaths occurred in the streets of Basra and not on British-owned or -occupied territory.
NEWS
By Charles Levendosky | August 11, 2002
On Aug. 2, U.S. District Court Judge Gladys Kessler ordered the U.S. Department of Justice to release the names of more than 1,180 individuals the government has detained in connection with its post-Sept. 11 investigation of terrorist activities. It was a victory for our democratic form of government. The 47-page ruling opens by stating a premise most Americans believe: "Secret arrests are a concept odious to a democratic society and profoundly antithetical to the bedrock values that characterize a free and open one such as ours."
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,brent.jones@baltsun.com | August 30, 2009
When Jimmie Shannon began working at a residential center for detainees in Baltimore 22 years ago, he wasn't sure where the job would take him. He was, however, certain that he was there for the long haul. "And I'll tell you why," said Shannon, who retired as director of the Volunteers of America Chesapeake Supervised Residential Center. "Because I was looking for a job that I could have an influence on helping people." Shannon, 64, stepped down in July from his position overseeing a staff of 30 at the 95-bed facility, which houses male detainees awaiting trial or serving brief sentences for minor, nonviolent charges.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes | March 16, 2007
A fight that broke out among detainees on a transport van at the Baltimore City Detention Center was brought under control by a an elite response team of correctional officers who happened to be gathered across the street. The team of about a dozen officers was outside Supermax, a maximum-security prison in the 400 block of E. Madison St., when the fight began shortly before 4 p.m. yesterday. A van returning from court with five detainees entered the gate at the detention center. Once the van was inside, two detainees in the vehicle began fighting, according to Barbara Cooper, a spokeswoman for the city detention center.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 23, 2002
WASHINGTON - Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld insisted yesterday that detainees from Afghanistan were being treated humanely at a U.S. base in Cuba, and rejected charges of ill treatment as exaggeration and "breathless" commentary. "The treatment of the detainees in Guantanamo Bay is proper, it's humane, it's appropriate and it is fully consistent with international conventions," Rumsfeld said during an hourlong Pentagon briefing dominated by questions about the detention of the 158 prisoners at Camp X-Ray.
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2014
Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski called on the Obama administration Thursday to turn its attention to two Marylanders who are being detained overseas and argued that the recent release of Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl raised significant questions for U.S. efforts to bring those men home. In a letter to President Barack Obama, the Maryland Democrat said she has concerns the resources dedicated to Bergdahl's release are not being equally applied to civil servants and contractors. One of those men, Alan Gross, has been detained in Cuba since 2009.
NEWS
By Brian Bennett, John Fritze and Christi Parsons, Tribune Newspapers | April 16, 2014
- Obama administration officials are considering allowing bond hearings for immigrants in prolonged detention, officials said, a shift that could slow the pace of deportations because immigration courts fast-track cases of incarcerated immigrants. Several thousand immigrants could be released from jails across the country if judges are allowed to hear their cases and grant bond, advocates say. The issue is particularly acute for Maryland, where those picked up by Immigration and Customs Enforcement are likely to spend far more time in detention centers than those apprehended in other states.
NEWS
March 12, 2014
California Sen. Dianne Feinstein, who chairs the Senate Intelligence Committee, has long been known as one of the U.S. intelligence community's staunchest defenders. So when an outraged Ms. Feinstein appeared on the Senate floor Tuesday to denounce the CIA and its director, John Brennan, for stealing documents from her committee's computers, spying on its activities and attempting to intimidate committee staffers investigating the agency's treatment of terrorist detainees after the Sept.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2014
A tier of the Maryland Correctional Institution in Jessup remained on lockdown Friday, a day after three inmates were stabbed in an argument among several prisoners. Two men suffered wounds that were not life-threatening. Another man, who was stabbed several times in the upper body, was "seriously injured," but his condition Friday was unknown, said Mark Vernarelli, a spokesman for the Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services. Paramedics were summoned to the medium-security prison in the 7800 block of House of Correction Road at 7:30 p.m. Thursday.
NEWS
By Susan Kerin | October 3, 2013
Yes, America. We tortured. And it was illegal, abhorrent and cruel. How can we ignore the facts? How can we fail to demand that the full and complete truth be provided to us? Earlier this year, those of us who follow such news of the intelligence world learned from the Constitution Project's Task Force on Detainee Treatment that there was great evidence - shared in an in-depth, 500-page, two-year study - that the U.S. government engaged in torture of detainees in the aftermath of the Sept.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2013
Two corrections officers at the Baltimore City Detention Center were injured shortly after noon on Wednesday when a detainee refused to enter his cell and a struggle ensued, the Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services said. The inmate, at the jail on drug charges, was being transferred to the cell when he refused to enter it, according to Rick Binetti, a department spokesman. As the two male officers began trying to subdue the inmate, both received minor injuries, Binetti said.
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,Sun reporter | September 7, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Under the glare of world condemnation for abuse of U.S. detainees at Abu Ghraib and Guantanamo, the Pentagon ordered for the first time yesterday that all of its prisoners in the war on terrorism be treated humanely under international law. It took the highly unusual step of publishing on the Army Web site a new military interrogation manual that prohibits such practices as hooding, using electric shock, depriving detainees of sleep or...
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 6, 2006
Among the hundreds of men imprisoned by the American military at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, there are those who brashly assert their determination to wage war against what they see as the infidel empire led by the United States. "May God help me fight the unfaithful ones," one Saudi detainee, Ghassan Abdallah Ghazi al-Shirbi, told a military hearing where he was accused of being a lieutenant of al-Qaida. But there are many more, it seems, who sound like Abdur Sayed Rahman, a self-described Pakistani villager who says he was arrested at his modest home in January 2002, flown off to Afghanistan and later accused of being the deputy foreign minister of that country's deposed Taliban regime.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2013
You empty your pockets of change, keys and pens, walk slowly through a metal detector and raise your arms above your head for a top-to-bottom frisking. A grim-looking security guard unlocks a metal door, then two more, closing each behind you with a "thump" as he leads you further into the detention center. Then a final door swings open. "Welcome," exclaims an affable young woman, gesturing toward a table laden with food and surrounded by fresh-faced teen-aged boys. "Won't you sit down and join us?"
NEWS
May 5, 2013
The hunger strike by inmates protesting conditions at the Guantanamo Bay detention facility in Cuba is forcing the Obama administration to revisit its policy of indefinite detention without trial for terrorist suspects. It's about time. As Mr. Obama noted Tuesday, the current policy is legally and morally unsustainable, and continuing it damages America's standing around the world without making the country any safer. The president needs to finally make good on his 2009 pledge to close Guantanamo, repatriate low-risk detainees to prisons in their home countries and bring the rest to the U.S. for trial.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.