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By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2011
They loved the soups and sandwiches and salads, but two regular Wednesday customers of the Souper Freak truck, Erik and Jill, asked and asked every week, "Why don't you have any dessert?" Now, finally, the Souper Freak does -- Chocolate Cowboy Brownies with potato chips, gluten free carrot and sweet potato bars, seven-layer vegan bars, all made by Liz Smith, whom the Souper Freak's Irene Smith calls the "dessert goddess. " It's hard to see in the window drawing, but it says, How the Souper Freak Got Desserts . Erik and Jill are, of course, the Baltimore Sun's own Erik " Midnight Sun " Maza and Jill " Unleashed " Rosen.
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FEATURES
Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
Aaron Walker's T-shirt caught singer-songwriter Norah Jones' attention in Towson on Thursday morning. It reads, "Keep calm have a cupcake. " So she did just that, according to Christine Richardson, owner of the Iced Gems cupcake truck and Reisterstown bakery of the same name. The above photo of the nine-time Grammy winner and Walker was taken after her purchase. Jones - who was in town for a "Live Lunch" performance at WTMD's studio before her group, Puss N Boots, plays the Ottobar tonight - ordered a dozen cupcakes, Richardson said, and she told Walker her favorite was the Coconut Dream cupcake.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick | August 17, 2011
A reader writes: "I had an unpleasant experience at ______ recently when the waiter cleared the dishes in front of my two dining guests who had finished their meal before my wife and I had. " His letter continues: "While we continued to eat our entrees, the waiter brought out desserts to our guests.  When I questioned him on the propriety of doing this, he gave us a lame excuse. About 5 minutes later, he cleared my dishes and proceeded to bring my dessert before my wife had completed her meal.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jessica D. Evans and The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
It ' s episode three it is clear that the Christmas magic is gone. This episode featured name-calling, fancy dessert parties and, yes, drama.  Teresa:  Teresa has a photo shoot for her new dessert line. During the photo shoot, every parent in the United States who was watching had the same thought: "Thank goodness Milania is not my daughter. " Milania grabs the camera and starts taking pictures, calls the cameraman a butthole and tells him to shut up. I personally find Milania entertaining but then again she's not my kid. Teresa then has a dessert debut party for all her close friends to taste her new products.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jasmine Wiggins | March 24, 2011
Well, if you’re making limoncello, you’ll have a few lemons on your hands. Score. I don’t know about you, but around this time of year, I’m impatient for spring produce and begin craving fresh flavors. Lemon is bright and does just the trick. Fortunately, there are many many recipes to use lemons in. One of my favorites from my childhood is lemon bars. Sweet, tart, with a rich buttery crust, lemon bars are a quintessential spring dessert. The recipe I’m usually use is somewhere in Arizona, so I searched around to find a new one, and found this recipe by David Lebovitz, whose food blog I love.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | July 23, 2003
Gertrude Lyles of La Plata said she wanted a recipe "for a dessert served in the employees' cafeteria at the Greater Southeast Community Hospital. It had apples, and cranberries with oatmeal, I think. It is similar to a brown Betty dessert." Gail Ellis of Westminster responded with this version. "This recipe was given to me over 25 years ago by Carolyn Roeth, a friend and Catonsville neighbor. It is simple to make and great as a side dish or as a dessert with Cool Whip or ice cream." Cranberry-Apple Bake Serves 4 3 cups chopped apples, unpeeled 2 cups raw, whole cranberries 1 cup uncooked quick oatmeal 3/4 cup granulated sugar 1/2 cup brown sugar 1/2 cup flour 1/2 cup chopped nuts 1 stick margarine, melted Mix apples and cranberries and put in the bottom of a 2-quart greased casserole.
FEATURES
By Faye Levy and Faye Levy,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | April 28, 1993
A favorite springtime dessert in France is a light strawberry savarin. One of the most elegant of classic cakes, this ring-shaped dessert is created from an easy-to-make batter.The cake gains its lightness from yeast, but is different from other yeast-leavened cakes; savarins are moist and delicate and not chewy. Thus they are served for dessert rather than as breakfast pastries or coffeecakes.In addition, the dough requires no kneading -- the batter is beaten. At a cooking school in Paris, I was taught to make the batter by beating it with a wooden spoon, but I prefer to make it with a mixer or a food processor.
FEATURES
September 16, 2000
Gary Pushkin, a Baltimore area physician and weekend cook, shows the world how to make dessert with a blowtorch on a segment of "Ultimate Kitchens" airing today at 12:30 p.m. on The Food Network. Pushkin removes a cake from a mold with the blowtorch, then coats the cake with chocolate sprayed from a paint gun. Pushkin says he learned many dessert-making techniques from the late Eric Goldschmidt, a well-known Baltimore cake-maker who operated shops on Park Heights Avenue and in the York Plaza shopping center.
FEATURES
By Michelle Huneven and Michelle Huneven,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | October 3, 2001
One night in Paris, two friends of mine took me to a tiny, modest cafe in the Sixth Arrondissement. It was one of countless dimly lighted establishments with battered chairs, tiny tables and a chalkboard menu. Wine and water arrived in unmarked glass decanters, and the waiter got up from his own aperitif to grudgingly take our orders. We'd had a large midday meal with family, so we ordered only salads, which were nothing exceptional, except that in France the lettuce actually has flavor.
FEATURES
By Carleton Jones | June 30, 1991
As a way of making summertime lunch or dinner parties a shade simpler, try combining the drink with the dessert.Hundreds of options are available for using wine to upgrade standard cold dessert dishes of American tables. With fresh fruit now in abundance, combinations of all sorts are available to the home chef.Contrary to popular use, the potentials of wine in cooking extend far beyond seasoning occasional soups and preparing marinades, and one of the directions it can take is the dessert.
NEWS
By Tony Glaros | May 7, 2014
Behind her deep Christian faith and family and friends, Alexis Streets delights in tending to another prize possession. This product, though, is designed to be here one minute and gone the next, lifting sagging hearts and spirits. That's why she is taking her sterling reputation as a businesswoman and is ready to turn the page on a new chapter with the rollout of her shop, Basket Treats by Alexis Streets.   "I have become the dessert trendsetter," declared Alexis Streets, 40, whose sweet spot is at 349 Main Street, in space most recently occupied by the American Justice Institute.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2014
Susan Kuhn from Monkton was looking for a recipe for a dessert that her mother used to serve. As she recalls, it was made with pieces of angel food cake, fruit cocktail and whipped topping, and had the consistency of a pudding once it had been chilled. Barbara Crowley Booth from Baltimore saw Kuhn's request and thought it sounded familiar to her. She searched her recipe files and found one that her mother, Agnes Crowley , had written down for her many years ago. Booth hoped it was what Kuhn was in looking for. Her mother called it "Great and Easy Dessert.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2014
Gilda Weinfeld from Pikesville said that last year during Passover, an acquaintance sent her some homemade chocolate-covered matzo. She said it was absolutely delicious. But when she called her friend to thank her for the gift, she asked for the recipe - and her friend politely declined to give it to her. Not to worry - there are plenty of good recipes for homemade chocolate matzo both online and in print. My go-to recipe for this holiday treat comes from "A Treasury of Jewish Holiday Baking" by Marcy Goldman.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2013
Watch Four Seasons Baltimore executive pastry chef Chris Ford in the first episode of the Chicago Restaurant Pastry Competition, a web-based video series. Ford competes against three other chefs in the competition, a single-day event where finalists are asked to make eight servings of an original, creative, plated dessert. The chefs also compete in a mystery challenge where they are asked to push the envelope of frozen, plated desserts. This is the second year for the competition and web series, which focused on Chicago-based chefs the first year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2013
Baltimore County Restaurant Week starts Friday and runs through Jan. 27. Chefs and owners from some of the 44 participating restaurants were expected to join Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz and Baltimore County Chamber of Commerce President Keith Scott on Thursday morning at Patrick's of Cockeysville for a Restaurant Week kick-off event. The county's version, unlike the city's, allows restaurants to set the fixed-price for their menus anywhere from $10 to $35 for anywhere from one to four courses.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, The Baltimore Sun | December 18, 2012
Akis Anagnostou is in the zone. Anagnostou, the pastry chef at Ouzo Bay, Harbor East's new Greek hot spot, holds a saucepan at an angle, rapidly stirring its contents with a metal spoon. Every few seconds, he lifts the spoon, pulling with it a long tail of sugary blue liquid that extends back into the pan. After several minutes, he deems the sugar ready, dropping a dollop of the liquid on a nonstick mat. Dipping a small funnel-like tool in the sugar solution, the chef leans over, blowing gently into the funnel as he carefully and slowly draws the tool, and attached sugar, upward.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie | February 9, 1992
J. Birosik is big on burritos. Really big."They're inexpensive, they come in infinite variety, there's no frying, so they're perfect for health-conscious people and vegetarians -- you can add some rice for a family meal -- and for entertaining, they're really fast. And inexperienced cooks can get really elegant results on the first try."But it's fun, that's the main thing," the food writer and cookbook author says on the phone from her home in Sedona, Ariz. She says, "It's the Aspen of Arizona.
FEATURES
By Kim Pierce and Kim Pierce,The Dallas Morning News Universal Press Syndicate | October 17, 1993
Choosing a dessert is really the battle of little voices. You know, the devil-you on one shoulder rhapsodizing over chocolate tortes and creme brulee while the angel-you murmurs about low fat, heart health and freedom from cellulite.But no matter how the angel tugs at your conscience, sometimes you gotta have it: the richest, nastiest, most sinful dessert that ever wrapped itself around a thigh. A dessert where cream and butter, like price, are no object.In these body-conscious times, people will give up cream sauces, bread and rich soups, "but they want to have a great dessert," says chef Emeril Lagasse, author of "Emeril's New New Orleans Cooking" (William Morrow and Co., $23)
HEALTH
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2012
When it comes to holiday desserts, going gluten-free doesn't require hours in the kitchen. "Baltimore is a haven for those who require a gluten-free diet," says Kate Hudkins, the editor of the Gluten-free in Baltimore blog ( glutenfreebaltimore.blogspot.com ). "As the years have gone by, I've seen an amazing increase in the number of options available for gluten-free desserts on menus at local restaurants and bakeries. " So put down the spatula and pick up the phone. Bakeries all over the Baltimore region are whipping up delicious gluten-free desserts that will look great on any holiday table.
BUSINESS
November 11, 2012
Add some personality to your meals with these oven-to-table cocottes from the Martha Stewart Collection, a fun way to personalize dishes from baked puddings to casseroles. Each lidded ceramic dish holds eight ounces. Sold in pairs, choose either the green cow/blue duck combo or the red chick/yellow rabbit. The cocottes are oven-safe to 450 degrees and dishwasher-safe. Each box also has a sample recipe. Set of two, $34.99 at Macy's stores and macys.com. — John-John Williams IV , The Baltimore Sun .
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