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NEWS
February 18, 2013
Reporter Mary Carole McCauley quotes writer Adam Lankford as saying terrorist attacks are motivated not by politics or religion but by despair ("Inside the mind of a suicide bomber," Feb. 10). I am sick and tired of hearing this misleading despair excuse for murderous suicide bombers. The 9/11 suicide bombers responsible for the incineration of the World Trade Center and the deaths of thousands of innocent Americans were not poor, uneducated and despairing individuals. They were from affluent neighborhoods and well-to-do families.
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NEWS
By Caroline Brennan | April 6, 2014
We have reached a solemn milestone in Syria: It has been three years since the beginning of the war that has uprooted the lives of millions of people. From a distance, this conflict can seem overwhelming or even hopeless. Up close, it feels personal - with hope just about the only thing people have to hold onto. What is striking are the masses of women and children who make up nearly 75 percent of the estimated 2.5 million Syrian refugees. While we don't see them as much because many women in the region are not comfortable being photographed, they shoulder some of the greatest burdens of this crisis as they struggle to find help and to care for their children, who are too-often severely traumatized.
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NEWS
Susan Reimer | April 16, 2013
It is hard not to give in to despair. In the hours since bombs exploded at the finish line of the Boston Marathon, forever marking in blood a day that celebrates spring, our nation's founding and the joy of the human body, there has been a lot of talk about resilience. About the resilience of the American people, of Boston people, of running people. "Boston is a tough and resilient town," President Barack Obama told the country. "So are its people. " The Boston Globe's columnists are defiant, too. "Tomorrow, this city is going to get up and live its life," wrote Farah Stockman.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | February 13, 2014
Melanie Over and Josh Rosella had been planning this day for over a year. Only their plan was to be spending it on a Jamaican beach, getting ready for their wedding, not sweating it out at the airport with most of their wedding party and guests, stuck in snowy Baltimore. "We were supposed to get married Saturday, and our flight was supposed to be this morning at 9:30, but it was delayed and eventually canceled," said a disappointed Rosella, sitting Thursday on a luggage cart alongside his equally disappointed bride-to-be at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport.
NEWS
By Caroline Brennan | April 6, 2014
We have reached a solemn milestone in Syria: It has been three years since the beginning of the war that has uprooted the lives of millions of people. From a distance, this conflict can seem overwhelming or even hopeless. Up close, it feels personal - with hope just about the only thing people have to hold onto. What is striking are the masses of women and children who make up nearly 75 percent of the estimated 2.5 million Syrian refugees. While we don't see them as much because many women in the region are not comfortable being photographed, they shoulder some of the greatest burdens of this crisis as they struggle to find help and to care for their children, who are too-often severely traumatized.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | May 13, 2008
We hate talking about it. We fear saying something awkward or intrusive. We think we'll only make it worse by acknowledging it, so we fall silent. "I think, in large part," Kathleen Kennedy Townsend says, "we don't have a culture that knows how to deal with death." Townsend, a former Maryland lieutenant governor, is, of course, sadly expert on the subject of death. When she was 12, her uncle was killed; when she was 16, her father. That these intimates were President John F. Kennedy and presidential candidate Robert F. Kennedy is something that is a well-known part of her biography, if not necessarily something that she speaks extensively about in public.
NEWS
By Shibley Telhami | October 10, 2001
THERE IS no escaping that much of today's political militancy is carried out by Islamist groups in the name of Islam and that these groups are on the ascendance. Why? The answer is hardly mysterious: In the absence of democracy and legitimate means for organizing political opposition, people turn to social organization. The mosque is one of the few vehicles for mass political mobilization. And there are profound reasons, both on foreign and domestic policy, for people to want to oppose the existing order.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | May 9, 1994
The popularity of Silvio Berlusconi, designated to become Italy's prime minister, has been compared with the populist appeal of Ross Perot in the United States and Bernard Tapie in France.It is more serious than that. Qualities of desperation and unreasonable hope were evident in the election that gave Mr. Berlusconi his present position, suggesting that much remains to come in Italy. A Berlusconi-led government is more likely than not end badly. Business success rarely can be duplicated in government.
FEATURES
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | April 29, 1992
Words come easily for Dick Cavett, so he had no trouble yesterday capturing the periods of overpowering despair that have kept this funnyman in his bathrobe for weeks while contemplating the relief that might come from suicide.Mr. Cavett, 56, strode into a room full of reporters at Johns Hopkins Hospital, his shirt open at the collar, tie slung over his arm, and quipped, "It's no fun being a specimen."Then, asked to describe clinical depression for those who might not understand, he had this to say: "Everything turns sort of colorless.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun Reporter | November 15, 2006
With just a coin, people can now turn despair in Baltimore into hope. Of course the hope lasts only a few seconds, but what did you want for a dime? New parking meters, which debut downtown today, are part - albeit a small one - of the city's freshly launched effort to erase homelessness in 10 years. These old-fashioned meters, the type Baltimore began retiring last year, have re-emerged with bright paint and a new mission. They have nothing to do with parking fines and everything to do with getting people off the street.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, Justin George and Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2013
Surrounded by farmland at an Iowa facility for troubled youths, Gervontae Burgess' circumstances could hardly have been more different from those in his violent Baltimore neighborhood. Brad Knight, Burgess' football coach, remembers a bright young man with a broad smile and a desire to help others. "Gervontae was one of those kids who soaked everything in. He wanted to be a great teammate and wanted to learn," said Knight, who coached Burgess at the Clarinda Academy. "My worry was always that when they went home, we were going to throw them right back to the wolves.
BUSINESS
June 10, 2013
American citizens from both ends of the political spectrum are rallying behind a former Marylander who has come forward as the NSA whistleblower. Also, if you're bored by that whole "active citizenship" thing, you can watch Game of Thrones and then print yourself a plastic battle axe. Welcome to your post-weekend trend report for June 10, 2013. Edward Snowden, the former CIA and Booz Allen Hamilton worker who revealed that the government is continually spying on millions of its own citizens, told The Guardian over the weekend that he doesn't expect to see his home again, but that he has no regrets about the leak.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 8, 2013
The closing of the steel mill at Sparrows Point overwhelmed Bob Jennings. Too young to retire at 59, he faced a gloomy job market for local manufacturing workers and a bureaucracy that couldn't get him timely training help. He felt like a failure. No, no, his wife said, "the system is the failure," but she couldn't convince him. On a cold Saturday morning, he wrote her a short note of apology, walked to their shed and shot himself. Troy Pritt, 44, also worked at the Baltimore County mill.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | April 16, 2013
It is hard not to give in to despair. In the hours since bombs exploded at the finish line of the Boston Marathon, forever marking in blood a day that celebrates spring, our nation's founding and the joy of the human body, there has been a lot of talk about resilience. About the resilience of the American people, of Boston people, of running people. "Boston is a tough and resilient town," President Barack Obama told the country. "So are its people. " The Boston Globe's columnists are defiant, too. "Tomorrow, this city is going to get up and live its life," wrote Farah Stockman.
NEWS
February 18, 2013
Reporter Mary Carole McCauley quotes writer Adam Lankford as saying terrorist attacks are motivated not by politics or religion but by despair ("Inside the mind of a suicide bomber," Feb. 10). I am sick and tired of hearing this misleading despair excuse for murderous suicide bombers. The 9/11 suicide bombers responsible for the incineration of the World Trade Center and the deaths of thousands of innocent Americans were not poor, uneducated and despairing individuals. They were from affluent neighborhoods and well-to-do families.
NEWS
November 8, 2012
I don't often suffer from insomnia, but sleep came slowly after the outcome of the presidential election was announced ("Re-elected," Nov. 7). My good and valued friend of almost a half-century, Nat Asch, often says that "we're going to die at the right time. " Not that he will say it this morning. Though I have not spoken with him yet today, I'm virtually certain he is delighted with the re-elected of President Barack Obama. (He and I approach most, though not all issues, from opposite ends of the political spectrum)
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | September 10, 1992
Pimlico Race Course opens a 20-day fall meet today amid an odd mixture of optimism from track management and despair among some horsemen.Although the excitement of the Preakness is missing during this abbreviated autumn venue, fans will be able to bet on the Maryland Million (Sept. 26) and a new National Pic-6 (Sept. 12, Sept. 26 and Oct. 4).Kent Desormeaux, Maryland's leading jockey for three years, will return from California for a nine-day riding stint starting Sept. 24.Track operator Joe De Francis is enthusiastic that Pimlico will be simulcasting it's entire card and commingling its betting pool with nine tracks nationwide.
NEWS
By David Holley and Sergei L. Loiko and David Holley and Sergei L. Loiko,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 20, 2005
ANDIJAN, Uzbekistan - Sanjab Valiakhunov's family can't find him, no matter how hard they search. "In the last three days, I was everywhere. I was at the morgue, at the hospital. He's not there," his sister, Rakhat Valiakhunov, said yesterday, in despair after clashes in Andijan last week left a death toll of at least 169 by official count. "They didn't let me into the morgue, though," she said. "They just said, `Your brother is not here,' as if they know my brother. Or maybe they just don't have any bodies in the morgue and don't want to admit it. I know that many families have been going around town looking for their loved ones and can't find them."
NEWS
March 14, 2012
The name "Constellation Energy" will still be around. The energy trading firm will still be doing much the same thing it ever has in a large, new building on Baltimore's waterfront. It will have somewhat fewer employees, but it will, at least for the next several years, maintain its status as one of the region's largest corporate philanthropists. And it's not as if Constellation was universally beloved around town anyway; despite its many contributions to the local economy and charitable scene, the company was often derided, as was its CEO, Mayo A. Shattuck III. So why should we mourn the sale of Baltimore's last Fortune 500 company to Chicago-based Exelon?
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | December 10, 2011
LaQuan Williams was deactivated for the first time prior to the Ravens' 24-10 victory over the Cleveland Browns last Sunday, but the rookie wide receiver took the move in stride. Asked if he was surprised to be a healthy scratch, the undrafted free agent from the University of Maryland said, “Kind of, but not really. We needed an extra linebacker, and we were deep at receiver. So that's how it worked out.” Williams has caught four passes for 46 yards thus far and has been targeted 12 times.
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