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ENTERTAINMENT
By Dr. Emilio Bombay and Dr. Emilio Bombay,FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM | August 24, 1998
I have heard that computers need to operate in a cool room.Nonsense. If that were true, then mine would have refused to operate long ago, what with all the black-light posters, the beads and the water bed.But if you want to talk temperature, that's a very different matter. Generally speaking, if you're comfortable in the room, your computer will be, too. If you haven't thrown it out, your owner's manual should give you the exact temperature range. For example, my Pentium does best between 50 and 95 degrees and can be stored between 40-below and 149 without damage.
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NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | September 10, 2013
A 31-year-old Port Deposit man was sentenced last week to 12 years in federal prison for possessing child pornography. Michael Dean Ragan Jr.'s prison term will be followed by 35 years of supervised release and he will be required to register as a sex offender in the place where he lives, where he works and where goes to school, under the Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act, according to the sentence imposed Sept. 4 by U.S. District Judge Ellen L. Hollander in Federal District Court in Baltimore.
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BUSINESS
By TOM PETERS and TOM PETERS,1991 TPG Communications | July 8, 1991
Most CEOs, surveys suggest, are not smitten with the desktop computer, even if they own one. But some are, and its impact is effectively documented by Mary Boone's book, "Leadership and the Computer" (1991, Prima Publishing, P.O. Box 1260MB, Rockland, Calif. 95677). While Ms. Boone provides several useful frameworks, 16 pithy interviews with CEOs give the book its special edge. A few examples:* Richard Pogue is managing partner of the global, 1,200-attorney firm Jones Day Reavis & Pogue. The outfit is "technologized" from stem to stern, via electronic document exchange (even with clients)
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | July 23, 2013
Lisa Meagher had a full house in Roland Park in the early afternoon of July 18, with people visiting from out of town, a plumber working in the basement, and the family dog in the front yard. The possibility of a home invasion was the farthest thing from her mind. But when they locked the dog in the back yard and left the house on Woodlawn Road for awhile, the last person to leave forgot to set the alarm. While they were gone, burglars apparently used a crowbar to pry open the front door.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington | June 6, 2002
PocketHub adds peripheral ports for laptop users The Kensington PocketHub ($40) appears to be no more than a small plastic box with a cord, but it couldn't be more helpful to laptop computer users. That's because Kensington's tiny Universal Serial Bus hub easily plugs into notebook computers to provide four extra ports. Moreover, it features a mini- AC adapter to make it one of the smallest powered hubs you'll see on the market. The hub is 2-by-2 inches and less than half an inch thick.
BUSINESS
By Bill Husted and Bill Husted,1991 Cox News Service | June 3, 1991
The dinosaur sitting on your desk may not be headed for extinction. The brute in question is the desktop computer. Just yesterday, it was the future.Today, some trade magazines and computer experts are saying that -- like the dinosaur -- the desktop computer may be too big to live in a world where only the small will survive.The beast touted as its likely replacement is the laptop computer. Techno-evolution has given laptops the power and speed of some desktop computers -- and they'll fit in your briefcase.
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL HIMOWITZ | October 12, 1997
AFTER six years of beating up on his old computer, a friend decided it was time to buy a new one. He did some comparison shopping, but instead of coming to me to ask whether he should by an IBM or a Compaq, he had a more interesting question: Should he buy a desktop computer or a laptop?"
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | May 24, 1993
REDMOND, Wash. -- A case of opening-night jitters pervades the sprawling corporate headquarters here that has become the world's software capital.On the verge of introducing its most ambitious software product yet, Windows NT, Microsoft Corp. has found itself in an unusual position: It is trying to ratchet back the expectations of the computer industry and computer users, who have come to expect blockbuster products with clockwork regularity from the world's dominant software publisher.NT stands for "new technology" and its formal introduction at an industry show in Atlanta today has been anticipated for months by the trade press and business publications, as well as by legions of computer hardware and software makers that have designed entire product lines to accommodate it. Microsoft sent about 70,000 test copies not only to those hardware and software people, but also to potential customers.
BUSINESS
By BOSTON GLOBE | September 6, 1996
IBM Corp. has begun making cheap, stripped-down "network computers" that might one day replace millions of powerful desktop machines now used in corporate America. The new International Business Machines Network Station will be the first real-world test of the controversial network computing concept.The Network Station will sell for about $700, compared with typical desktop computer prices of $2,000 or more. But unlike the standard desktop machine, the Network Station won't be able to do very much on its own.It relies on a computer chip that is widely used in cable TV decoder boxes.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2012
A 25-year-old Gambrills man was sentenced Tuesday to eight years in prison for possession of child pornography, including images depicting "sadistic and violent conduct" toward children, according to prosecutors. Robert Jay Hudson II, who pleaded guilty to the charge in July, will also have to serve 40 years of supervised release after his incarceration and be registered as a sex offender wherever he lives, works or attends school, the office of Maryland U.S. Attorney Rod J. Rosenstein said.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2012
A 25-year-old Gambrills man was sentenced Tuesday to eight years in prison for possession of child pornography, including images depicting "sadistic and violent conduct" toward children, according to prosecutors. Robert Jay Hudson II, who pleaded guilty to the charge in July, will also have to serve 40 years of supervised release after his incarceration and be registered as a sex offender wherever he lives, works or attends school, the office of Maryland U.S. Attorney Rod J. Rosenstein said.
BUSINESS
By BILL HUSTED and BILL HUSTED,The Atlanta Journal-Constitution | April 3, 2008
Ihave a Pentium 4 PC with a 1.7-gigahertz chip. It has 256 megabytes of memory. I recently installed a high-speed USB card. When I run the backup or run my spyware program, it freezes up. What can I do about this, and what upgrades would you recommend for my system? I basically use it for spreadsheets and Internet. -- Ron Rowland Try adding memory. I'd upgrade to 1 gigabyte, or 512 megabytes at the least. If that doesn't help, I would consider replacing the machine. Beyond adding memory, which is easy and fairly cheap, additional upgrades would be too costly.
BUSINESS
By JIM COATES | July 27, 2006
I have a desktop computer, and I want to transfer all the information from my hard drive to a laptop. What is the procedure? - Dianna Joslin The safest, easiest and probably least costly way to move data from one Windows XP computer to another one running Windows XP is to acquire a specially wired USB cable that plugs into USB ports on both machines (Don't use an ordinary USB cable; it could damage your computers.). These special cables also work between Macintosh desktops and laptops running OS X. They also can be used to move data from a Mac OS X computer to a Windows PC. Consider something along the lines of the new SimpleTransfer Data Transfer and Synchronization Utility from SimpleTech (www.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2004
Statistics show that the theft of portable computers continues to be on the rise. And while that might not be so surprising, what might cock an eyebrow is learning that it's not the loss of the equipment itself that is of major concern. Oh sure, the computer has some value, and loss because of its theft is part of the problem. But the real value of these stolen computers lies within the data they contain. The costs associated with the theft of computer data are literally hundreds if not thousands of times more valuable.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Peter Rojas and Peter Rojas,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 20, 2003
With its measly 1.44 megabytes of storage capacity, the 3.5-inch diskette is an anachronism in a world of 20-gigabyte MP3 players, DVD burners and tiny memory cards that can hold hundreds of digital photos. Yet like a lingering party guest who hasn't realized that it's time to go home, it somehow holds on as a form of removable storage. Diskette drives are still found on most computers, even though few people make much use of them. According to Disk/Trend, a company in Mountain View, Calif.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington | June 6, 2002
PocketHub adds peripheral ports for laptop users The Kensington PocketHub ($40) appears to be no more than a small plastic box with a cord, but it couldn't be more helpful to laptop computer users. That's because Kensington's tiny Universal Serial Bus hub easily plugs into notebook computers to provide four extra ports. Moreover, it features a mini- AC adapter to make it one of the smallest powered hubs you'll see on the market. The hub is 2-by-2 inches and less than half an inch thick.
BUSINESS
By BILL HUSTED and BILL HUSTED,The Atlanta Journal-Constitution | April 3, 2008
Ihave a Pentium 4 PC with a 1.7-gigahertz chip. It has 256 megabytes of memory. I recently installed a high-speed USB card. When I run the backup or run my spyware program, it freezes up. What can I do about this, and what upgrades would you recommend for my system? I basically use it for spreadsheets and Internet. -- Ron Rowland Try adding memory. I'd upgrade to 1 gigabyte, or 512 megabytes at the least. If that doesn't help, I would consider replacing the machine. Beyond adding memory, which is easy and fairly cheap, additional upgrades would be too costly.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | July 23, 2013
Lisa Meagher had a full house in Roland Park in the early afternoon of July 18, with people visiting from out of town, a plumber working in the basement, and the family dog in the front yard. The possibility of a home invasion was the farthest thing from her mind. But when they locked the dog in the back yard and left the house on Woodlawn Road for awhile, the last person to leave forgot to set the alarm. While they were gone, burglars apparently used a crowbar to pry open the front door.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | July 30, 2001
NO MATTER what my boys tell you, I did not grow up in the technological "Dark Ages." Nor even the "Middle Ages." In fact, I grew up in the 1950s and headed off to college in 1965. In retrospect, it doesn't seem like I was missing very much. I drove to school in a comfortable, if monstrous, car along the very same highways I'll use a month from today to take my younger son to the same college. The new family bus gets better mileage than the old one, but the speed limits are lower today, so the trip will take a bit longer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | June 4, 2001
For many high school graduates and their parents, this is the time to start thinking about computers - specifically, which one to take to college in the fall. The most frequent question I get is whether to buy a desktop or a laptop machine. Some students go off with visions of studying and taking notes in the library, which means they lean toward a laptop, while others see themselves sticking closer to their dorm rooms and the comforts of a full-size PC. There's no "right" answer to the question, but before you or your student decide, it helps to know a bit about the differences between laptop and desktop machines - along with what you'll expect to pay for them.
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