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Desire

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NEWS
December 15, 2011
I read with interest Rabbi Nina Beth Cardin's recent commentary on our appetite for more ("The problem of desire," Dec. 12). She rightly describes desire as "that shape-shifting seducer" which can never be satisfied. She also points out the positive aspects of desire as driving our ambition and our curiosity. Her essay showed the dilemma of desire: It can have a good form and a bad form. As a Christian Scientist, I have grappled with a proper view of desire, but have found answers in the words of Mary Baker Eddy, the founder of Christian Science.
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | October 2, 2014
Here's another thing: The attack ad on Larry Hogan that claims Anthony Brown's Republican challenger for governor wants to give a $300 million tax break to corporations at the expense of kindergartners - that's another stretch into the shady side by the Democrats, and for a couple of reasons. First of all, Hogan hasn't said any such thing yet, although, being a mainstream Republican businessman, he says he would cut Maryland's corporate tax rate, and we all know the story there: You can't be a Republican without saying you want to cut taxes.
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NEWS
By Gabriel Rotello | September 14, 1994
RESEARCHERS from Harvard University and the Center for Health Policy in Washington published a study last week reporting that close to 20 percent of American men and women have had homosexual experiences or felt homosexual attractions since adolescence. The last time we heard about a study attempting to measure homosexuality in America, researchers from the Guttmacher Institute were reporting that just 1 percent of the male population was gay, so you might wonder what's going on here.The answer is definitions, or lack of them.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, Aaron Dodson and Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2014
Tom Chuckas , president and chief operating officer of the Maryland Jockey Club, said Saturday that he would like to see horse racing's Triple Crown events played out over two months, not five weeks. Speaking to reporters at Pimlico Race Course three hours before post time for the 139th Preakness, Chuckas reiterated his position that a longer recovery period for horses would better benefit them and business in general. "Look, I'm not anti-tradition. I have great respect for tradition.
NEWS
By Stephen Vicchio | February 14, 1994
FOR most of my life I have felt a craving for something. I'm not sure what. This unnamed desire, like the sultry voice of bachelorette No. 3, hovers on the other side of the partition -- communicative but disembodied. This secret desire -- more like a longing, really -- has remained so constant, so forceful, that I think of it as an inherent part of my life, something like a birthmark.Before the longing entered me (I don't know how else to describe it), I used to think of myself as a sailor, bending over the maps of my possible lives, thinking of the many courses I might chart.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | July 15, 1991
A whole television-reared generation likely remembers actress Barbara Stanwyck only as Victoria Barkley, the iron-handed rancher of "The Big Valley" (on ABC from 1965-69). But a new documentary portrait premiering on cable tonight leaves no doubt that, as host Sally Field observes, Stanwyck assembled "an astonishing body of work" in a 60-year career."Barbara Stanwyck: Fire & Desire" can be seen at 8 on the TNT basic cable service, followed by a screening of one of her mid-career films, "My Reputation" from 1946.
NEWS
By Diane Cameron | November 25, 2008
We are concerned about the economy. We worry about the stock market, investments and retirement. We hesitate to open bank statements. We are told, "It will get better." "It will get worse." "It will rebound." Some say it will be bad for another year and then it will improve. How do we cope? We have to make do with less. Lots of articles offer advice: Eat at home. Take the bus. Rearrange, don't redecorate. At the heart are these questions: What can you live without? Can we be happy with less?
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | January 21, 1992
Jim Peters' paintings of women, at Loyola, are expressionistic, psychological and disturbing. The upstate New York artist has been quoted as saying his art is "on the edge of sentimental," but sentimental is hardly the way they come across.His figures are placed in often bare or ramshackle interiors, achieved with gestural passages that suggest emotional or physical upheaval, even violence. In some there seems to be no way out of the interiors, only a window too small or too high, or both, for escape.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | April 25, 1995
We want our teen-age daughters to say "no" to sex, and to that end we drape them in the sack cloth of morality, we pump up their self-esteem, we teach them karate. We sign them up for sports teams and keep them out of the malls. We scare them, we empower them, we wear them out, we lock them up.But those same girls are watching Brad Pitt on the big screen and feeling as though the air-conditioning is off. And we never talk to them about why.We do not teach girls what it is we want them to say "no" to. Until our daughters can identify those sexual feelings inside their changing bodies, until they can say what it feels like to have desires, no one will believe that "no."
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | January 18, 1998
ONE SATURDAY morning on the sidelines of a soccer game, where mothers keep one eye on the action while sharing their triumphs and confessing their failures to other mothers, a friend told me of the time she retrieved her startled teen-aged daughters from a parent-less house where they had been harmlessly hanging out with a couple of platonic male friends.In the car on the way home, she tried to explain her caution to her outraged girls: "Look, you don't understand what it is like for boys.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2014
Janis Ahalt Riker, a retired attorney and business owner who also ran a Howard County antiquarian bookshop, died of cancer April 8 at her home in Portland, Ore. She was 69 and had lived in Columbia for many years. Born Janis Kay Ahalt in Baltimore and raised on Hillendale Road, she was the daughter of Charles Ahalt, a Baltimore & Ohio Railroad conductor, and Pauline Prebish Ahalt, a homemaker. She was a 1962 graduate of Towson High School and was selected to participate in the St. Timothy's School summer Latin American Seminar.
NEWS
March 20, 2014
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NEWS
March 17, 2014
When debate over changing the composition of Baltimore County's school board last gained traction in the General Assembly, parents had a long list of grievances against then-Superintendent Joe A. Hairston and a board rightly viewed as overly deferential to him. Among other things, Mr. Hairston had appeared completely oblivious to the views of those he was supposed to be serving - the parents and children of Baltimore County - on matters ranging from...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2014
Five months before Kwame Kwei-Armah's initial three-year contract as artistic director of Center Stage was to expire, the board of directors has extended this tenure through June 2018. The company's managing director, Stephen Richard, who started in 2012, has received a similar contract extension. "We hired Kwame with the hope that it would be for a longer-term relationship than three years," said Jay Smith, president of the board of trustees. "And when we hired Stephen, we thought that gave us a great team.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2013
Yes, dear hearts, Midweek Madness is back after a hiatus. For no particular reason, other than a strange interest in vintage anything and a desire to perk up your day with something totally absurd, this week's selection is an eyewear fashion show that you have to see to believe. Even then, you may harbor doubts. I recently read a story referring to someone's "important glasses," and maybe that's the best description for these lovelies. Don't miss the last one -- that's my favorite.
NEWS
By J.B. Salganik | October 15, 2013
While it saddened me to read recently of the attendance troubles at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum, I was not surprised. In a city where museums generally exceed expectations, the Reginald F. Lewis Museum has always left something to be desired. As a high school history teacher in Baltimore City public schools, I have never wanted to take my students there because I know intuitively they would hate it. While I understand the impulse to showcase African Americans' social and economic high achievers, this positivist approach obscures the scope of what black Americans have overcome in the past and the challenges they still face today.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,edward.lee@baltsun.com | January 20, 2009
An uncertain offseason and future beckon several Ravens players. Linebackers Ray Lewis, Terrell Suggs and Bart Scott, center Jason Brown, strong safety Jim Leonhard, fullback Lorenzo Neal and kicker Matt Stover are the most prominent Ravens who can become unrestricted free agents in March. While the team contemplated using the franchise tag on either Lewis or Suggs, the other players spoke yesterday of their desire to remain with the team. "Everybody knows that I would love to come back here to Baltimore," said Brown, who anchored a young, talented offensive line.
NEWS
By Gelareh Asayesh Sandy Banisky of The Sun's metropolitan staff contributed to this article | May 23, 1991
Last Thursday, state school Superintendent Joseph L. Shilling told Gov. William Donald Schaefer he wanted to talk. Then he told the governor: "I'm leaving.""I said, 'Gee, did we do something?' " Mr. Schaefer recalled.Why is Dr. Shilling, first the guardian of and increasingly an instigator of Maryland's grand plan for education reform, leaving the top state education job to run nine schools in his home county of Queen Anne's?According to Dr. Shilling, he is leaving because Queen Anne offered him the job and he wants to do it.It's as simple as that.
FEATURES
By Bret McCabe, For The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2013
Eddy Whitely loads a blanket-wrapped item of furniture into his the van on a chilly weekday morning, but the co-owner of Orions Objects, a furniture dealer that specializes in midcentury modern design, isn't taking the piece for delivery. He's taking it to the oven. "We're the only place in Baltimore that sells baked furniture," Whitely says, followed by a laugh. He explains that he and his business partner, Stacey Greer, turn to the Baltimore Body Shop, an automotive repair and maintenance garage in Remington, to apply the lacquers to restoration projects that require it, a process that involves curing the finish in an oven.
EXPLORE
June 11, 2013
Two projects in rather close proximity to each other are getting a lot of attention from the people who live near where they're proposed. While both have the potential to result in similar kinds of traffic problems, one is in keeping with laws already on the books, while the other will require a change in the law before it can be built. Specifically, plans to build an apartment complex of 285 units on 17.7 acres near the historic Mt. Soma farm at the southern end of the Bel Air Bypass are within what zoning allows on the land in question.
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