Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDesigning Women
IN THE NEWS

Designing Women

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Orlando Sentinel | August 8, 1991
Saying she is "not stupid enough to be vindictive," "Designing Women" producer Linda Bloodworth-Thomason vowed Tuesday to reconsider a season-opening script replete with jabs at Suzanne Sugarbaker, the character played by Delta Burke, who left the show after a power struggle with the producers.A handful of TV critics who attended the filming of the episode last week in Hollywood came away with the impression that Ms. Bloodworth-Thomason, who wrote the script, was trying to pour salt on Ms. Burke's wound.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 12, 2010
DIXIE CARTER, 70 Star of 'Designing Women' "Designing Women" star Dixie Carter, whose Southern charm and natural beauty won her a host of television roles, has died at age 70. Carter died Saturday morning, according to publicist Steve Rohr, who represents Carter and her husband, actor Hal Holbrook. He declined to disclose the cause of death or where she died. Carter lived with Holbrook in the Los Angeles area. "This has been a terrible blow to our family," Holbrook said in a written statement.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Zerline A. Hughes and Zerline A. Hughes,SUN STAFF | July 26, 1999
Jerwon Bethel spent his summer sewing a denim ensemble -- vest, shorts and two hats -- that he struts in every chance he gets.A reversible vest gives it that store-bought look, and it fits fine, thank you.Twelve-year-old Jerwon learned his skills in the past two months at Edmondson Westside High School's Career Technology Summer Camp.The six-week program introduces Baltimore seventh- and eighth-graders to vocational options through 13 courses that focus on such pursuits as styling hair, designing homes on the computer, and baking cakes.
NEWS
September 23, 2007
ALICE GHOSTLEY, 81 Award-winning actress Alice Ghostley, the Tony Award-winning actress best known on television for playing Esmeralda on Bewitched and Bernice on Designing Women, died Friday at her home in Studio City, Calif., after a long battle with colon cancer and a series of strokes. Ms. Ghostley made her Broadway debut in Leonard Sillman's New Faces of 1952. She received critical acclaim for singing "The Boston Beguine," which became her signature song. In the 1960s, she received a Tony nomination for various characterizations in the Broadway comedy The Beauty Part and eventually won for best featured actress in The Sign in Sidney Brustein's Window.
NEWS
September 23, 2007
ALICE GHOSTLEY, 81 Award-winning actress Alice Ghostley, the Tony Award-winning actress best known on television for playing Esmeralda on Bewitched and Bernice on Designing Women, died Friday at her home in Studio City, Calif., after a long battle with colon cancer and a series of strokes. Ms. Ghostley made her Broadway debut in Leonard Sillman's New Faces of 1952. She received critical acclaim for singing "The Boston Beguine," which became her signature song. In the 1960s, she received a Tony nomination for various characterizations in the Broadway comedy The Beauty Part and eventually won for best featured actress in The Sign in Sidney Brustein's Window.
NEWS
April 12, 2010
DIXIE CARTER, 70 Star of 'Designing Women' "Designing Women" star Dixie Carter, whose Southern charm and natural beauty won her a host of television roles, has died at age 70. Carter died Saturday morning, according to publicist Steve Rohr, who represents Carter and her husband, actor Hal Holbrook. He declined to disclose the cause of death or where she died. Carter lived with Holbrook in the Los Angeles area. "This has been a terrible blow to our family," Holbrook said in a written statement.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | February 3, 1992
THE MINUS-DELTA factor seems to have done in "Designing Women" among readers responding to a recent informal poll on this season's cast changes on the CBS Monday night sitcom. Most do not even remotely approve.Only four of more than 100 correspondents thought the arrival of Jan Hooks and Julia Duffy in place of Delta Burke and Jean Smart has left the show equally enjoyable.A clear majority are deeply upset with the changes, and many say they have stopped watching the show."There's nothing left but the memory of how sharp, on the mark and irresistibly funny the show used to be," wrote Gwen Owens of Baltimore, for example.
FEATURES
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 26, 1996
Celebrities are helping to raise the profile of large-size women. Rosie O'Donnell, Roseanne, Linda Ronstadt, Kathy Bates and Wynonna have changed the way we think about glamour.Former talk-show host Carnie Wilson hopes to do more and start her own clothing line:"I want to reach the people who shop at Wal-Mart. [The fashion industry] is in such denial. It's like giving heroin to an addict. 'If we give you fat sizes, you're going to stay fat!' "Delta Burke (who played Suzanne Sugarbaker on "Designing Women")
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | February 18, 1991
It looks like "The Trials of Rosie O'Neill" may be in for the familiar trial-by-neglect treatment from CBS.As reader Rose Kelly of Baltimore has complained in a recent correspondence, the good 10 o'clock Monday night show starring Sharon Gless as an angst-ridden public defender -- perhaps the season's best new entry -- has not been seen since Jan. 28. It has been pre-empted on successive Mondays by specials featuring Cher, Connie Chung and, tonight, Mary...
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | April 13, 1993
Dorothy Swanson rattled the network's cage like it had never been rattled before.In the summer of 1983, after CBS canceled the first-year police drama "Cagney & Lacey," Ms. Swanson and thousands of other devoted fans nationwide inundated the network with a spontaneous outpouring of letters and phone calls. The ruckus helped draw more viewers to summer reruns of the series.And then CBS did a most remarkable thing: It rescinded the cancellation and returned "C&L" to the airwaves in early 1984, where it stayed in popular, Emmy-winning grandeur through 1988.
FEATURES
By TANIKA WHITE and TANIKA WHITE,SUN REPORTER | February 7, 2006
New York-- --Outside the tents at Bryant Park, the trees are bare; the wind whips through. It is winter, and it is cold. While most of us may be dreaming about the arrival of spring, it is Fashion Week, and fall has arrived. For eight days and nights, big names including Oscar de la Renta, Donna Karan, Marc Jacobs and Vera Wang are unveiling their fall collections. The mood this fall is a continuation of many of the elements prevalent in recent seasons. Femininity is a major theme. Ruffles, bows and lace are prominent accents.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,SUN REPORTER | December 25, 2005
Some movies seem destined to inspire fashion. Memoirs of a Geisha, which opened in Baltimore Friday, is one of them. Critics have given the lush romantic epic mixed reviews, but they have nothing but praise for the sumptuous costumes by Colleen Atwood, who won an Oscar for her work on Chicago. The movie version of Arthur Golden's best-selling novel is filled with brightly colored, beautifully embroidered kimonos, some of which were rented, others which took months to create. They are more than just costumes; at least two important plot twists revolve around them.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1999
Ida S. Williams, who designed hats popular with church-going women, died Nov. 24 of a heart attack at Union Memorial Hospital. She was 85.Mrs. Williams had been a resident of FutureCare-Homewood since the summer. She had previously been a 40-year resident of Forest Park.From the mid-1960s until the early 1980s when she retired, she operated a millinery business from her Springdale Avenue home. She designed and created a colorful line of spring and fall hats. "They were all handmade and carried the label, `Hats By Ida'," said a nephew, Warren L. Hobbs of Baltimore, who described her as a "loquacious and fashionable lady."
NEWS
By Zerline A. Hughes and Zerline A. Hughes,SUN STAFF | July 26, 1999
Jerwon Bethel spent his summer sewing a denim ensemble -- vest, shorts and two hats -- that he struts in every chance he gets.A reversible vest gives it that store-bought look, and it fits fine, thank you.Twelve-year-old Jerwon learned his skills in the past two months at Edmondson Westside High School's Career Technology Summer Camp.The six-week program introduces Baltimore seventh- and eighth-graders to vocational options through 13 courses that focus on such pursuits as styling hair, designing homes on the computer, and baking cakes.
FEATURES
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 26, 1996
Celebrities are helping to raise the profile of large-size women. Rosie O'Donnell, Roseanne, Linda Ronstadt, Kathy Bates and Wynonna have changed the way we think about glamour.Former talk-show host Carnie Wilson hopes to do more and start her own clothing line:"I want to reach the people who shop at Wal-Mart. [The fashion industry] is in such denial. It's like giving heroin to an addict. 'If we give you fat sizes, you're going to stay fat!' "Delta Burke (who played Suzanne Sugarbaker on "Designing Women")
FEATURES
By Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | April 29, 1993
Bill Clinton's most acerbic critic and Hillary Clinton's best pal finally have found something they agree on: Reports of bad blood between them are ridiculous.A supposed rift between conservative talk-show host Rush Limbaugh and Linda Bloodworth-Thomason, friend of the Clintons and TV producer, came up on Mr. Limbaugh's TV show last week. During a lampoon of Earth Day, the host's "man in Washington" interviewed John Ritter, star of "Hearts Afire," which was created by Ms. Bloodworth-Thomason.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | January 20, 1992
OK, it has been half a season. Isn't it time to say that "Designing Women" just isn't as funny without Delta Burke and Jean Smart? Media Monitor wants to hear from readers about the show, which can be seen at 9:30 tonight on Channel 11.To recap: After a season of turmoil involving Burke on and off the set, some of it centering on her weight problems, Burke departed the show. Her character, Suzanne Sugarbaker, is supposedly off living in Japan.Smart, the sweet Southerner Charlene, also left the show for family reasons, after having a baby.
FEATURES
By John Carman and John Carman,San Francisco Chronicle | July 16, 1992
Delta Burke can spare us the awkwardness and describe her own image in the press: "Nut bitch," she says.Ms. Burke bounced, or got bounced, out of "Designing Women" after public squabbles with her producers. Nowadays she says she's on speaking terms only with Meshach Taylor and Jean Smart among her former colleagues.TV Guide recently profiled her as a modern showbiz incarnation of Lucrezia Borgia. Her husband, Gerald McRaney, fared no better.And besides, let's face it, she's fat. A PBS show recently spoofed her as a Godzilla-type monster, devouring buildings as she ballooned and galumphed through city streets.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | April 13, 1993
Dorothy Swanson rattled the network's cage like it had never been rattled before.In the summer of 1983, after CBS canceled the first-year police drama "Cagney & Lacey," Ms. Swanson and thousands of other devoted fans nationwide inundated the network with a spontaneous outpouring of letters and phone calls. The ruckus helped draw more viewers to summer reruns of the series.And then CBS did a most remarkable thing: It rescinded the cancellation and returned "C&L" to the airwaves in early 1984, where it stayed in popular, Emmy-winning grandeur through 1988.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer | November 22, 1992
If Dixie Carter ever made a list of life's most embarrassing moments, near the top would be her debut with the Atlanta Symphony last year.Her performance wasn't the problem; her fingernails were.Walking onto the stage -- her shapely legs peeking out from her dress, her false eyelashes firmly in place -- she was ready to play the chanteuse. Or so she thought.Then she glanced down, and it hit her."I had only painted the fingernails on one hand," she says. "I'd forgotten to finish. I couldn't have apologized more to the audience.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.