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By John S. Saladyga and John S. Saladyga,Newsday | May 24, 1992
Once the exclusive tools of architects and professional designers, computer-aided design, or CAD, programs are becoming increasingly available to do-it-yourselfers who are as comfortable with computer software as with building hardware.Although not as detailed as the CAD programs used by the pros, the personal-computer versions are sophisticated enough to give clear, professional results (no more drawing out plans on grocery bags or napkins).They provide enough functions to design one room or a whole house and the landscaping around it. In some cases, they also calculate how much material is required and how much it will cost.
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NEWS
By Jill Zarend and Jill Zarend,Staff writer | April 21, 1991
Sheriff Robert G. Pepersack wanted a new look for his department. SoFriday, he adopted an insignia capturing the "new spirit of the sheriff's office."Matt Raschka, a junior at Old Mill High School, came up with the design that can be found on the department vehicles, uniform shoulder patches of all sworn officers and on as the letterhead on all correspondence and documents.Raschka was one of 14 high-school graphic arts students invited in February to submit designs to Pepersack's office by mid-March.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Staff Writer | March 3, 1994
For nearly two decades, the students of Boys' Latin School have had to fight traffic on West Lake Avenue whenever they wanted to go from one part of campus to another.Concerned about their safety, the school's administrators have decided to build a pedestrian bridge to link the upper school campus, on the north side of the 800 and 900 blocks of W. Lake Ave., with the lower and middle school campuses, on the south side.There's just one problem. The panel that reviews designs for new buildings in Baltimore neighborhoods took one look at the proposed bridge, with its precast concrete panels, thick columns and multiple flights of steps, and sent its designers back to the drawing board.
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | February 20, 1994
In addition to being one of the oldest handmade home products, ceramic tile remains one of the most popular hard-surface finishes for floors and walls. In fact, ceramic tile may now be more favored than ever before because it so incontestably gives consumers their money's worth. Few design materials are tougher or easier to maintain, and none is richer in its decorative possibilities.How unfortunate, then, that in homes in northern climates ceramic tile has been used almost exclusively in obvious areas like the bathroom.
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair | August 2, 1992
Probably it has something to do with the political revolution that swept aside the Soviet Union. But even that historic upheaval doesn't fully account for the current fascination with things Russian, particularly with art objects from the czarist era.Whatever the reason, Americans are now snatching up all sorts of Russian-inspired creations, from grand-scale exact copies of furniture in St. Petersburg's Hermitage museum, to decorative fabrics based on...
FEATURES
By Sharon Stangenes and Sharon Stangenes,Chicago Tribune | June 21, 1992
CHICAGO -- When Andree Putman opened Ecart, her Paris-based firm, in 1978, she was alone and unknown. Today she is the toast of interior design on both sides of the Atlantic.So it is surprising that Ms. Putman says "good riddance" to the decade of her greatest success and predicts that the 1990s will be better for good home design."The 1980s was the decade of the championship of arrogance and money," she declares in the deep, husky voice that has advised clients from the French minister of culture to the owners of Barneys New York.
FEATURES
By Elaine Markoutsas and Elaine Markoutsas,Universal Press Syndicate | July 3, 1994
Raymond Waites had all his ducks in a row. With such simple images as ducks, geese, bears, tulips and other sweet designs, Mr. Waites defined American country style in the early '80s and launched a multimillion-dollar business.But his success wasn't all in the design. As vice president and chief creative director for Gear Holdings Inc., a New York-based design and marketing firm, Mr. Waites pioneered the concept of licensed home furnishings. His collections gave consumers an unprecedented opportunity for one-stop shopping by making available, from more than one manufacturer, products that coordinated in color and theme.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | June 16, 1992
After reviewing credentials of 10 groups, state aviation officials have selected a joint venture of the STV Group of Baltimore and William Nicholas Bodouva & Associates of New York as their first choice to design the proposed $100 million expansion of the international wing at Baltimore-Washington International Airport.Michael West, an associate administrator at the Maryland Aviation Administration, says his agency is negotiating with the top-ranked design team and hopes to have a contract to present to the state Board of Public Works in several months.
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,Sun Staff Writer | February 23, 1995
Instead of suffering in the cold and rain, homeless people might someday sleep in a "Compactable Chalet," a "Port-a-Home 2000" or "Project POSH."Three teams of students at the University of Maryland Baltimore County came up with those names -- and the structures to match -- when they took on an assignment to design and build an original, portable, low-cost shelter to keep a homeless person warm and dry.The freshmen in honors engineering put up $20 each,...
FEATURES
By Elaine Markoutsas and Elaine Markoutsas,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | March 17, 1996
The cultures, architecture, art and crafts of the Far East have long piqued Western interest, and furniture, textiles and ceramics of Asian origin have long influenced Western styles.Since the 18th century, cabinetmakers in England, France, Italy and the United States have interpreted furniture from the Orient, incorporating such elements as bracket feet, pagoda crowns and fretwork.Chinese Chippendale and glazed chintz fabrics printed with Asian bird-and-flower motifs, in fact, were so embraced by the British that they've been assimilated into English style.
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