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By NICK SHIELDS and NICK SHIELDS,SUN REPORTER | November 20, 2005
David Herbert Wilson, a retired architect who helped design hospitals, residences, public buildings and offices, died of heart failure Tuesday at his Baltimore home. He was 86. Mr. Wilson was born and raised in eastern New Jersey and graduated from Harvard University with a degree in engineering in 1940. A natural at ballroom dancing, Mr. Wilson became a dance instructor while in college to help pay for school. While in school, he met his future wife, Allen Dickey. The two married in 1941.
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BUSINESS
By Christina Nifong VTC and Christina Nifong VTC,The Christian Science Monitor | March 29, 1992
BOSTON -- No more shadowy halls with door after anonymous door. No more sardine-can rooms with extension cords draping from every outlet. No more paper-thin walls and tacky lounge furniture.Dormitories of today are having to respond to students' wishes as the college applicant pool shrinks and universities across the United States use every card in their decks to attract top students to their schools."Student housing is more amenable today than in the past, which was more prison-like than residential," says Greg Strickler, director of design and construction at MPC and Associates Inc., in Washington, a development consultation firm for universities across the country.
FEATURES
By Sharon Stangenes and Sharon Stangenes,Chicago Tribune | June 21, 1992
CHICAGO -- When Andree Putman opened Ecart, her Paris-based firm, in 1978, she was alone and unknown. Today she is the toast of interior design on both sides of the Atlantic.So it is surprising that Ms. Putman says "good riddance" to the decade of her greatest success and predicts that the 1990s will be better for good home design."The 1980s was the decade of the championship of arrogance and money," she declares in the deep, husky voice that has advised clients from the French minister of culture to the owners of Barneys New York.
FEATURES
By Elaine Markoutsas and Elaine Markoutsas,Universal Press Syndicate | July 3, 1994
Raymond Waites had all his ducks in a row. With such simple images as ducks, geese, bears, tulips and other sweet designs, Mr. Waites defined American country style in the early '80s and launched a multimillion-dollar business.But his success wasn't all in the design. As vice president and chief creative director for Gear Holdings Inc., a New York-based design and marketing firm, Mr. Waites pioneered the concept of licensed home furnishings. His collections gave consumers an unprecedented opportunity for one-stop shopping by making available, from more than one manufacturer, products that coordinated in color and theme.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,[Sun Reporter] | November 19, 2006
The evening, unlike the two men it celebrated, was a glitzy affair. Interior designers Jay Jenkins and Alexander Baer -- known for the understated elegance of their designs -- threw what may well be the Party of the Year to commemorate Jenkins' taking over the design firm Alexander Baer Associates from his old friend and mentor. The event was held last month at the Baltimore Museum of Art, where Baer is a trustee. There were almost 500 guests: past and present clients of the two designers, tradespeople they work with, friends and staff.
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | July 19, 1992
Q: I'm about to furnish and decorate a room for my two preteen boys. It's a fairly large space that I would like to have serve as a playroom and as a quiet place for reading, watching TV and relaxing with friends. Can you give me some suggestions for how to proceed?A: Function should clearly be your foremost concern. And, from that perspective, I would suggest that the room be designed in such a way it will literally be able to grow along with your growing boys. That means using movable furniture, easily accessible storage units and adjustable-height shelving.
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,Sun Staff Writer | February 23, 1995
Instead of suffering in the cold and rain, homeless people might someday sleep in a "Compactable Chalet," a "Port-a-Home 2000" or "Project POSH."Three teams of students at the University of Maryland Baltimore County came up with those names -- and the structures to match -- when they took on an assignment to design and build an original, portable, low-cost shelter to keep a homeless person warm and dry.The freshmen in honors engineering put up $20 each,...
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | June 16, 1992
After reviewing credentials of 10 groups, state aviation officials have selected a joint venture of the STV Group of Baltimore and William Nicholas Bodouva & Associates of New York as their first choice to design the proposed $100 million expansion of the international wing at Baltimore-Washington International Airport.Michael West, an associate administrator at the Maryland Aviation Administration, says his agency is negotiating with the top-ranked design team and hopes to have a contract to present to the state Board of Public Works in several months.
FEATURES
By Elaine Markoutsas and Elaine Markoutsas,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | March 17, 1996
The cultures, architecture, art and crafts of the Far East have long piqued Western interest, and furniture, textiles and ceramics of Asian origin have long influenced Western styles.Since the 18th century, cabinetmakers in England, France, Italy and the United States have interpreted furniture from the Orient, incorporating such elements as bracket feet, pagoda crowns and fretwork.Chinese Chippendale and glazed chintz fabrics printed with Asian bird-and-flower motifs, in fact, were so embraced by the British that they've been assimilated into English style.
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