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Design Engineer

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April 12, 2002
Colin Felix Harby, a retired design engineer who made two unsuccessful bids for Congress from the 3rd District, died in his sleep Wednesday at the home of a brother in New Boston, Mich. He was 75. Mr. Harby, who had divided his time between Canton and New Boston, was born and raised in Wyandotte, Mich. He attended Eastern Michigan University, until enlisting in the Army in 1944. He served with a tank corps in the Philippines. After the war, he became a draftsman for the former Glenn L. Martin Co. in Middle River, and worked in a similar capacity from 1955 to 1960 at Crown Cork and Seal Co. Inc. In 1960, he joined Maryland Shipbuilding and Drydock Co. as a design engineer, and from 1968 until retiring in 1990, he was a design engineer at Maryland Cup Corp.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2013
Robert S. Kraemer, former director of planetary exploration for NASA who was also an expert in rocket engines, died Tuesday at Brightview Assisted Living in Catonsville of complications from a fall. He was 84. The son of a citrus rancher and a homemaker, Robert Samuel Kraemer was born in Fullerton, Calif., and raised in Placentia, Calif. He was a 1946 graduate of Fullerton High School and earned a bachelor's degree in 1950 in aeronautical engineering from the University of Notre Dame.
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NEWS
August 22, 2005
John J. Balfour Jr., a design engineer and World War II veteran, died of cancer Friday at Northwest Hospital Center. The Randallstown resident was 84. Born in East Greenwich, R.I., Mr. Balfour had been studying engineering at what is now the University of Rhode Island when he enlisted in the Army Air Corps. He served in the South Pacific as a bombardier and navigator, earning the Air Medal with six oak leaf clusters. After the war, Mr. Balfour studied at Rhode Island School of Design and soon joined the Grinnell Fire Protection Co. He was transferred to the company's Baltimore location, where he worked for 38 years, retiring as district manager.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2012
Harry E.G. Mueller, a retired design engineer and World War II veteran, died Saturday of respiratory failure at Bonnie Blink, the Maryland Masonic Home. The former longtime Dundalk resident was 93. The son of a gymnastics teacher and a homemaker, Mr. Mueller was born in Baltimore and raised on Federal Street. After graduating from Polytechnic Institute in 1937, he worked as a draftsman for the old Glenn L. Martin Co. in Middle River. In 1941, Mr. Mueller married the former Anna L. Hacker, and the couple moved to the Watersedge community in eastern Baltimore County and later to Dundalk, where they raised their three daughters.
NEWS
June 16, 2007
Hans Dietrich Heyck, a design engineer and fan of vintage airplanes, died Wednesday of a stroke at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The longtime resident of Phoenix, Baltimore County, was 84. Mr. Heyck was born and raised in Paehl, Germany. He was drafted into the Germany army in 1942 and was captured while serving in Tunisia. He was sent to prisoner-of-war camps in Kentucky and Oklahoma before being repatriated in 1945. Mr. Heyck completed his training as a design engineer at the Munich Technical Institute and in 1954 immigrated to Winchester, Mass.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2012
Harry E.G. Mueller, a retired design engineer and World War II veteran, died Saturday of respiratory failure at Bonnie Blink, the Maryland Masonic Home. The former longtime Dundalk resident was 93. The son of a gymnastics teacher and a homemaker, Mr. Mueller was born in Baltimore and raised on Federal Street. After graduating from Polytechnic Institute in 1937, he worked as a draftsman for the old Glenn L. Martin Co. in Middle River. In 1941, Mr. Mueller married the former Anna L. Hacker, and the couple moved to the Watersedge community in eastern Baltimore County and later to Dundalk, where they raised their three daughters.
NEWS
June 6, 2004
Alfred H. Kinney, a retired aeronautical engineer, died of leukemia Thursday at his Spring Hill, Fla., home. The former Kingsville resident was 85. Born in Burlington, Vt., he earned an engineering degree at the Wentworth Institute of Technology in Boston. After serving in the Navy during World War II, he joined the old Glenn L. Martin Co. in Middle River. A design engineer and supervisor, he worked on weight-saving devices for planes and on their wing flaps. He left the firm in 1968 and moved to St. Louis, where he was a McDonnell Douglas Corp.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2011
Leo Francis Dudek, a retired mechanical engineer and decorated World War II veteran who was active with the Catholic War Veterans of America, died Sunday of pulmonary fibrosis at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The longtime Dundalk resident was 85. Mr. Dudek, the son of a crane operator and a cannery worker, was born in Baltimore and raised in Canton. After graduating from Patterson High School in 1943, he enlisted in the Army Air Forces. He was stationed at Tinian, in the Mariana Islands, where he served with the 24th Bomb Squadron, 6th Bomb Group.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,[Sun reporter] | April 1, 2007
If you think your thesis in college was grueling, try this out: Take a go-kart and modify its engine so it can run on both diesel fuel and used cooking oil, the kind with chunks of fried stuff in it. But that's not all. For a handful of Naval Academy seniors trying to complete their "capstone" mechanical engineering project, the challenge requires them to build an engine that can power the go-cart on diesel fuel from their engineering building to the...
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | November 9, 2008
Elmer Rathbun Haile Jr., a retired national parks roads design engineer and historian of the Long Green Valley, died of heart failure Monday at Oak Crest Village. He was 98. Born in Towson and raised in Cockeysville, he was a 1927 Towson High School graduate. Between 1927 and 1931, while he was a Johns Hopkins University civil engineering student, he commuted via the old Pennsylvania Railroad from Cockeysville to Charles Street. In a 1992 Sun article, he recalled the construction of the old railroad underpass on York Road in Cockeysville.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2011
Leo Francis Dudek, a retired mechanical engineer and decorated World War II veteran who was active with the Catholic War Veterans of America, died Sunday of pulmonary fibrosis at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The longtime Dundalk resident was 85. Mr. Dudek, the son of a crane operator and a cannery worker, was born in Baltimore and raised in Canton. After graduating from Patterson High School in 1943, he enlisted in the Army Air Forces. He was stationed at Tinian, in the Mariana Islands, where he served with the 24th Bomb Squadron, 6th Bomb Group.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | November 9, 2008
Elmer Rathbun Haile Jr., a retired national parks roads design engineer and historian of the Long Green Valley, died of heart failure Monday at Oak Crest Village. He was 98. Born in Towson and raised in Cockeysville, he was a 1927 Towson High School graduate. Between 1927 and 1931, while he was a Johns Hopkins University civil engineering student, he commuted via the old Pennsylvania Railroad from Cockeysville to Charles Street. In a 1992 Sun article, he recalled the construction of the old railroad underpass on York Road in Cockeysville.
NEWS
June 16, 2007
Hans Dietrich Heyck, a design engineer and fan of vintage airplanes, died Wednesday of a stroke at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The longtime resident of Phoenix, Baltimore County, was 84. Mr. Heyck was born and raised in Paehl, Germany. He was drafted into the Germany army in 1942 and was captured while serving in Tunisia. He was sent to prisoner-of-war camps in Kentucky and Oklahoma before being repatriated in 1945. Mr. Heyck completed his training as a design engineer at the Munich Technical Institute and in 1954 immigrated to Winchester, Mass.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,[Sun reporter] | April 1, 2007
If you think your thesis in college was grueling, try this out: Take a go-kart and modify its engine so it can run on both diesel fuel and used cooking oil, the kind with chunks of fried stuff in it. But that's not all. For a handful of Naval Academy seniors trying to complete their "capstone" mechanical engineering project, the challenge requires them to build an engine that can power the go-cart on diesel fuel from their engineering building to the...
NEWS
August 22, 2005
John J. Balfour Jr., a design engineer and World War II veteran, died of cancer Friday at Northwest Hospital Center. The Randallstown resident was 84. Born in East Greenwich, R.I., Mr. Balfour had been studying engineering at what is now the University of Rhode Island when he enlisted in the Army Air Corps. He served in the South Pacific as a bombardier and navigator, earning the Air Medal with six oak leaf clusters. After the war, Mr. Balfour studied at Rhode Island School of Design and soon joined the Grinnell Fire Protection Co. He was transferred to the company's Baltimore location, where he worked for 38 years, retiring as district manager.
NEWS
June 6, 2004
Alfred H. Kinney, a retired aeronautical engineer, died of leukemia Thursday at his Spring Hill, Fla., home. The former Kingsville resident was 85. Born in Burlington, Vt., he earned an engineering degree at the Wentworth Institute of Technology in Boston. After serving in the Navy during World War II, he joined the old Glenn L. Martin Co. in Middle River. A design engineer and supervisor, he worked on weight-saving devices for planes and on their wing flaps. He left the firm in 1968 and moved to St. Louis, where he was a McDonnell Douglas Corp.
NEWS
By Bennard B. Pearlman and Bennard B. Pearlman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 8, 2000
Frank Lloyd Wright, America's pioneering 20th-century architect, was sometimes more interested by design than engineering when it came to producing buildings. There was, for example, the flippant remark he made to a client who called to complain that a leak in the roof of his new Wright-designed house was dripping onto the dining room table. The reply: Move the table. Wright, who died in 1959, might have been more concerned by the fate of his residential masterpiece, the home known as Fallingwater.
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