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BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | September 13, 2001
A Baltimore architecture firm beat several other American firms to win a competition to design residential and commercial buildings in Shanghai. Design Collective, a 70-person firm with offices on Pratt Street, was chosen by a jury of Chinese and American architects in a process that lasted a year and a half, company officials said yesterday. The firm won a $100,000 prize and the right to negotiate a contract with the Chinese developer that is building the site, said Richard Burns, a principal with the firm.
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FEATURES
The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2011
The Fitzgerald, a transit-oriented apartment and retail project in midtown Baltimore, won the Grand Design Award this month in the annual Excellence in Design program sponsored by the Baltimore chapter of the American Institute of Architects. Design Collective of Baltimore was the architect of The Fitzgerald, developed by The Bozzoto Group and named for writer and one-time Baltimore resident F. Scott Fitzgerald. The building is located at Mount Royal Avenue and Oliver Street, on the former Bolton Yards property next to the Mount Royal Cultural Center stop of the light rail system.
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BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | March 17, 1993
Seeking to make a strong statement about the way its business has grown and changed, the 15-year-old architectural and urban design firm known as Columbia Design Collective is changing its name and moving from Columbia to downtown Baltimore.Principals of the company signed a lease this month to occupy the 14th floor of 100 E. Pratt St., an office tower that overlooks the Inner Harbor.From their drafting tables, employees will be able to see many of the projects on which they are working, including 100 HarborView Drive, the 28-story first tower of the HarborView community; the conversion of the Pier 4 Power Plant to a sports-oriented museum and entertainment complex; and a new health sciences library for the University of Maryland's Baltimore campus.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2010
Mario L. Schack, an award-winning architect and educator who influenced Baltimore's skyline with his buildings and his critique of others' designs, died Thursday at Gilchrest Hospice Care of complications from surgery he had in October. The Riderwood-Lake Falls-area resident was 81. Over a career that spanned more than five decades, Mr. Schack balanced jobs as an architecture professor and department chairman at Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y., and a partner in several Baltimore-based design firms, including RTKL Associates; Marks, Cooke, Schack and Thomas (now Marks, Thomas Architects)
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | December 21, 2001
No more indecision. No more trailers. Baltimore has settled on a site for a permanent visitors center, and the glassy pavilion should open its doors to the Inner Harbor for the 2003 tourist season. Architects at Design Collective Inc. outlined to a city design panel yesterday their vision for a center on the grassy knoll just south of Harborplace's Light Street Pavilion. Eventually, the city will redo the entire stretch on the west bank of the harbor as a park. The see-through, boxlike center will invite tourists inside to collect information on the Inner Harbor and other Baltimore attractions.
NEWS
March 31, 1993
You've heard of man-bites-dog stories? Elvis sightings? How about this one: "Columbia firm relocates to downtown Baltimore."Shocking, but true, as they say in the tabloids.The Columbia Design Collective, a successful architectural shop of 40 employees, has decided to drop "Columbia" from its name and move from its home of 15 years on Broken Land Parkway in Howard County to a new high-rise tower overlooking the Inner Harbor.The firm, which has been involved in the design of many center-city projects, felt that moving downtown would lend a vibrancy and energy to the operation that's hard to grasp in the suburbs.
BUSINESS
March 16, 1997
The following companies were honored at the 20th annual awards ceremony of the Sales and Marketing Council of the Home Builders Association of Maryland Wednesday at the Mechanic Theater.AWARD OF EXCELLENCESingle-family detached$150,000-$189,999: The Jefferson, Mueller Homes, Woods at Winands, Randallstown. Architect: GMA&D.$190,000-$219,999: The Worthington, Thomas Builders, Villages of Winterset, Owings Mills. Architect: J. W. Henneman & Associates.$220,000-$234,999: The Revere, B. Andrews & Company, Castle Blaney, Forest Hills.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | July 8, 1999
FOR MORE than a decade, the architectural firm of Ellerbe Becket has been a leader in the design of sports arenas for professional and collegiate basketball and hockey teams, including the MCI Center in Washington, the First Union Center in Philadelphia and the Fleet Center in Boston.Now it's part of the team that has been commissioned to design a $90 million, 17,000-seat arena to replace Cole Field House at the University of Maryland's College Park campus.The Kansas City, Mo., office of Ellerbe Becket is working with Design Collective of Baltimore to design the arena, which will be used primarily for men's and women's basketball and campus events.
NEWS
March 31, 1993
You've heard of man-bites-dog stories? Elvis sightings? How about this one: "Columbia firm relocates to downtown Baltimore."Shocking, but true, as they say in the tabloids. The fact is the Columbia Design Collective, a successful architectural shop of 40 employees, has decided to drop "Columbia" from its name and move from its home of 15 years on Broken Land Parkway to a new high-rise tower overlooking the Inner Harbor.The firm, which has been involved in the design of many center-city projects, felt that moving downtown would lend a vibrancy and energy to the operation that's hard to grasp in the suburbs.
NEWS
By Edward Gunt and Edward Gunt,Sun Staff Writer | March 11, 1994
And now, "The Crab."Having launched the Columbus Center and the Children's Museum, the Schmoke administration is poised to present "Blue Crab Park" as the Inner Harbor's coming attraction.On the same bill: "Natural History Spiral," "Info/Picnic Park," "Science Playground" and the "Wet & Wild Water Park and Skating Rink."Those ideas came a step closer to reality yesterday when the Baltimore Development Corp. announced plans to hire the design team that proposed them. The team's assignment will be to guide a $7.5 million overhaul of 20 acres of downtown Baltimore's most prominent shoreline.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,arin.gencer@baltsun.com | September 10, 2008
The new Towson elementary school will be designed to hold about 450 students, contain about 69,000 square feet and be built with "green" features in mind, according to a presentation yesterday evening to a Baltimore County school board committee. A few months after recommending the construction of what is being called Towson West Elementary School, board members had the opportunity to get a sense of what the new building would look like. The building, to be built next to Ridge Ruxton School on Charles Street, is on track to open in 2010, according to the report from Design Collective Inc., a Baltimore firm.
NEWS
By LAURA CADIZ and LAURA CADIZ,SUN REPORTER | November 13, 2005
As a tenant with a long-term lease, the Columbia Association is competitively poised to solicit developers to build it a new headquarters, according to an urban economist. Don Zuchelli, a contract worker for Design Collective Inc., has suggested that the homeowners association allow developers to compete over buying land for a new headquarters and constructing the building, which could also house restaurants and entertainment. "Let private enterprise come in and make some offer to you," Zuchelli told the association's board of directors Thursday night.
NEWS
By LAURA CADIZ and LAURA CADIZ,SUN REPORTER | October 26, 2005
The county-sponsored, weeklong charrette for the future development of Columbia's Town Center was billed as an all-access pass for residents to be involved with planning the vision for the community's downtown. But a meeting behind closed doors with the Columbia Association and one of the design team members - during which the idea of tearing down the association's current building was discussed - has some crying foul. On Thursday, Columbia Association Board Chairman Joshua Feldmark hastily called a meeting of the group with a Design Collective Inc. contract worker to discuss the future of the association's headquarters.
NEWS
By LAURA CADIZ and LAURA CADIZ,SUN REPORTER | October 26, 2005
At the beginning of the intensive design gathering about the future of Columbia's Town Center, residents were handed pens and paper and told to dream about their visions for the planned community's downtown. They talked about better pedestrian access, more cultural amenities and a destination park. Their dreams have been turned into a draft master plan that aims to transform Town Center into a bustling urban environment. And the county and Baltimore firm Design Collective Inc. are working to move that vision - unveiled to a crowd of residents last weekend - a few steps closer to reality.
NEWS
By LAURA CADIZ and LAURA CADIZ,SUN REPORTER | October 23, 2005
After a week of brainstorming ideas about the future development of Columbia's downtown, residents yesterday saw the product of their work at the conclusion of an intensive design gathering sponsored by Howard County. Baltimore firm Design Collective Inc. unveiled a draft master development plan for Columbia's Town Center that aims to turn the area into a bustling urban center with additional homes and businesses, pedestrian walkways and a destination park. The meeting process, known as a charrette, began Oct. 15 with residents invited to map out their visions of what Columbia's downtown should look like.
NEWS
By LAURA CADIZ AND CHRIS EMERY and LAURA CADIZ AND CHRIS EMERY,SUN REPORTERS | October 19, 2005
Large sheets of white paper filled with Columbians' visions for Town Center line the hallway leading to the Spear Center at General Growth Properties' downtown headquarters. Written in red, black, blue and green markers, they list the hopes and concerns residents expressed at the start of the weeklong intensive design gathering that began Saturday and will result in a master development plan for Columbia's downtown. A few samples: "We don't want giant office buildings outlining the crescent area - we want award-winning architecture!
NEWS
By LAURA CADIZ and LAURA CADIZ,SUN REPORTER | October 26, 2005
The county-sponsored, weeklong charrette for the future development of Columbia's Town Center was billed as an all-access pass for residents to be involved with planning the vision for the community's downtown. But a meeting behind closed doors with the Columbia Association and one of the design team members - during which the idea of tearing down the association's current building was discussed - has some crying foul. On Thursday, Columbia Association Board Chairman Joshua Feldmark hastily called a meeting of the group with a Design Collective Inc. contract worker to discuss the future of the association's headquarters.
NEWS
By LAURA CADIZ and LAURA CADIZ,SUN REPORTER | November 13, 2005
As a tenant with a long-term lease, the Columbia Association is competitively poised to solicit developers to build it a new headquarters, according to an urban economist. Don Zuchelli, a contract worker for Design Collective Inc., has suggested that the homeowners association allow developers to compete over buying land for a new headquarters and constructing the building, which could also house restaurants and entertainment. "Let private enterprise come in and make some offer to you," Zuchelli told the association's board of directors Thursday night.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2005
A group of about 200 eastern Baltimore County residents and business leaders has approved a plan to build a community with homes, including senior housing, on the spot where the Kingsley Park apartments are being demolished. The blueprint for the new village includes up to 86 units for a three-story senior housing facility, 73 single-family detached homes and 43 townhouses with a range of prices. A developer would be required to adhere to the plan, which is designed to foster a sense of connection among neighbors, with landscaped common areas and walking trails.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Architecture Critic | May 16, 2004
When Baltimore's leaders set out to redevelop the Inner Harbor in the 1960s, they never dreamed that the city might become a tourist destination. The waterfront promenade and Rash Field were intended for recreational use by area residents, not out-of-towners. Little thought was given to building hotels, because that would have required a belief that someone might actually want to stay in town overnight. There's no clearer indication of the city's low aspirations for tourism than the tiny facility that until recently served as Baltimore's visitors' center.
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