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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2010
Forty-seven years had passed since the last star had been added to the American flag, before two new designs were flown for the first time over Fort McHenry within months in 1959. Arizona became the 48th star in 1912, and the new flags adding Alaska and Hawaii each made their debut in Baltimore — both on the Fourth of July. An executive order signed by President Dwight D. Eisenhower on Jan. 3, 1959, after the admittance of Alaska to the Union, reconfigured the stars on the old 48-star flag to seven rows of seven stars each, staggered horizontally and vertically.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | October 9, 2014
A new Inner Harbor tower that would be among the tallest in Baltimore received design approval Thursday, with one member of the city's architecture panel describing the project as an “elegant, sophisticated building that's exciting for Baltimore.” Plans call for a roughly 500-foot-tall blue glass tower located at the corner of Light and Conway streets downtown. The $140 million building would rise 44 stories, with 392 luxury apartments, 12,500-square-feet of ground floor shopping and a 477-space parking garage open to the public.
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NEWS
June 21, 2012
I can not agree more regarding Herman Belz opinion on Frank Gehry's design for theDwight D. EisenhowerMemorial ("Unworthy of Ike," June 11). Mr. Gehry's awareness is slight and lacks aesthetic depth. Certain character fundamentals of President Eisenhower's life should capture our imagination and the memory in principle. A structure, sculpture or monument in the public domain becomes a record of the person we knew in life, his accomplishment and legacy. The emphasis here should be his movement of energy, mass and miracle, bravado and willingness in the face of a better tomorrow for mankind.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | October 9, 2014
The city's design panel on Thursday approved a master plan for a large mixed use development in East Baltimore opposite the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. The proposal by developer MCB Real Estate LLC calls for two buildings along Eastern Avenue: a six-story apartment building, with ground floor retail and an interior courtyard, and a smaller, one-story shoppping structure, with a large 250-spot parking lot farther east. If market demand is strong, MCB could create a taller mixed-use site in place of the smaller building.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2013
Richard C. Rice, owner of a Baltimore kitchen and bathroom design firm, died Oct. 14 of cancer at his Ruxton home. He was 51. Richard Carew Rice was born in Baltimore and raised in Roland Park. He was the son of John Hubner Rice Jr., who had been vice president of Barton-Cotton Inc., a Baltimore graphics and printing company, and Carew Cotton Rice Lee, a homemaker. After graduating in 1980 from Gilman School, where he played varsity soccer and lacrosse, he earned a bachelor's degree in economics in 1984 from the University of Colorado at Boulder.
FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2013
Stephanie Bradshaw Inc., the Baltimore-based design company, is moving into the Clipper Mill area of the city from its current Cockeysville location, which was home to the firm for two years. "I'm excited to bring my business into the city and to be a part of its growing design community," said Stephanie Bradshaw, founder and creative director of the company. The firm includes wedding and event design and planning, interior design and personal styling. "I feel like Baltimore is definitely finding its place," she said.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2013
The Baltimore City Police created a new logo for #ASaferBaltimore social media campaign. In an attempt to be interactive and social media savvy, they asked their Twitter followers what they thought of all the design. Big mistake. "If this were the 80s, I'd say you nailed it," wrote @ TimmyWade94 . Others placed the design in the 1970s or 90s. Several opined that it appeared to be the title sequence of a 90s sitcom, perhaps a sequel to "Perfect Strangers. " Some wondered what the technology the department used to create the logo.
NEWS
April 24, 2014
While I applaud Towson University's goal of providing top-notch facilities for all its sports, I do not feel that the proposed design backing up to the houses in Rodgers Forge is the best idea. People in the neighborhood, like myself, chose this neighborhood due to the many characteristics it is known for. The schools are top-notch, the neighborhood is quiet and family friendly, and its off the main path enough the foot and car traffic is minimal compared...
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2011
When Johns Hopkins University civil engineering student Erin Kelly was assigned a class project to design a steel structure, her thoughts went to her sorority "big sister," Miriam Frankl. Frankl, a fellow Hopkins student, was killed last year in a hit-and-run crash involving a chronic drunk driver while she was crossing St. Paul Street near campus. Kelly thought it would be fitting to make her project the design of a pedestrian bridge that might keep other Hopkins students safe. So she teamed up with two engineering school classmates, Charlotte Healy and Alison Ignatowski, to research what it would take to build a bridge across Charles Street — the main north-south road through campus — and whether there was a demand for it. Kelly said that would be a better location for the bridge than the site on St. Paul Street where Frankl was killed.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
They are as well-versed in 3-D printing, weaving and the anthropology of fashion as they are in classic looks from Chanel and Dior. Students in the Maryland Institute College of Art s fibers program approach fashion from an unusual perspective. Although the college does not offer a traditional fashion design curriculum, graduates are creating inventive garments informed by education rooted in a sensual - and intellectual - understanding of textiles. "Fashion is a cultural force that relates to how we communicate ideas, values, fears and aspirations, our sense of belonging, and our ideas around gender and class," said fibers department chair Valeska Populoh.
FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
Aya Dixon, 15, has dreams of working for a top design house before eventually branching off to create her own line of couture. Up until now, her only brush with that industry was thumbing through glossy magazines or watching reality shows on television. That changed Wednesday when the Baltimore Design School sophomore got a chance to mingle with the likes of Anna Wintour, popular designer and "Project Runway" judge Zac Posen and other big names in the fashion industry. Dixon was part of a group of 10 students from Baltimore Design School who attended the White House's first Fashion Education Workshop, led by first lady Michelle Obama.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard and For the Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
To Michelle Miller, urban interior design is all about working with light and architecture to create space. The Baltimore resident and award-winning home decor professional spoke with Chesapeake Home + Living about creating easier, more comfortable living in open lofts and narrow row houses. How would you describe your particular style? I call my style "warm modern.” I love using natural materials in a very clean and sophisticated way. Quality over quantity. Always. What do you do in a first client consultation?
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
They are as well-versed in 3-D printing, weaving and the anthropology of fashion as they are in classic looks from Chanel and Dior. Students in the Maryland Institute College of Art s fibers program approach fashion from an unusual perspective. Although the college does not offer a traditional fashion design curriculum, graduates are creating inventive garments informed by education rooted in a sensual - and intellectual - understanding of textiles. "Fashion is a cultural force that relates to how we communicate ideas, values, fears and aspirations, our sense of belonging, and our ideas around gender and class," said fibers department chair Valeska Populoh.
FEATURES
By Christianna McCausland and For The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
When Ward Westrick retired from commercial real estate development, he and wife Ginny were happy to sell their home in McLean and leave the density of Northern Virginia behind to settle on the Chesapeake Bay's calmer shores. While Ward may have made a living in development, he and Ginny did not want to build a home. However, after looking at as many as 50 houses from Gibson Island to Mayo and finding nothing but disappointment, they snapped up a 2.25 acre parcel on the South River in Annapolis (before it was even listed)
NEWS
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
On the Chesapeake Bay, the summertime months are made for cruising. From the crisp mornings of late spring through the hazy evenings of August, a boat on the bay is the place to be. And how better to cruise than in a boat built by one of the bay's own builders? A handful of companies, on the Eastern and Western shores, design and build custom boats that are worthy of any body of water. But, thanks to their creators' deep knowledge of the area, these yachts are especially at home in the bay. Campbell's Custom Yachts 26106A Bachelor Harbor Drive, Oxford 800-361-4786 campbellsboatyards.com For Tom and Susan Campbell, owners of Campbell's Custom Yachts and three marinas in Oxford, what they do every day all comes down to one thing: the finished project.
NEWS
By Catherine Mallette and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
From smaller projects to whole house redos, this year's projects show high quality of construction and creative approaches to design. Each year the Remodelers Council of the Home Builders Association of Maryland (HBAM) holds its Remodeling Award of Excellence competition, recognizing excellence in design and craftsmanship. More than 20 categories included both commercial and residential projects. Here, we present those that won the top prize, the Award of Excellence, in the residential competition for 2013.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts | February 10, 1991
When architect Charles W. Moore received the Gold Medal last week from the American Institute of Architects -- an award considered by many to be architecture's highest honor -- the developers of a new residential community in Maryland had good reason to be glad.The 3,000-unit Russett community will go on the market starting this spring as the latest of three large developments in western Anne Arundel County, and one of the features that sets it apart from its competitors is that the community center has been designed by Mr. Moore, a longtime friend of co-developer Curtis F. Peterson.
NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | January 24, 1994
New York. -- Must we always let ''them'' -- architects, shopping-center moguls, parking-lot operators, local politicos, city planners -- decide what the world around us will look like?Or could all of us, as ordinary citizens, be given a voice in the design of the streets and freeways, the buildings, neighborhood centers and parks and commercial centers that make up our daily environment?An emerging form of technology says the days of ''them'' calling the shots could be numbered.The technology, a few years old and now gaining fast in sophistication and accessibility, is called ''computer visual simulation'' or ''image processing.
NEWS
By Catherine Mallette and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
The American Institute of Architects' local chapter awarded projects with small footprints, sustainable elements and beautiful design. Each year, the AIA Baltimore presents its annual Design Awards, rewarding the best work of Maryland architects or projects completed in the state. The residential awards can be reconstructions, renovations or new constructions. This year, judges gave out two awards for residential design, both to Matthew Compton of Foundry Architects. Compton has worked full time in architecture since 2002, was licensed in 2007 and co-founded Foundry in 2011.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
Douglas R. Legenhausen, a jewelry designer and master craftsman who worked in iron, gold and silver, died Sept. 20 at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson of complications from back surgery. He was 69. The son of Chester Legenhausen, a house painter, and June Legenhausen, a homemaker, Douglas Raymond Legenhausen was born in Queens, N.Y., and was raised in Ossining, N.Y., and Croton-on-Hudson, N.Y. After graduating in 1964 from Mahopac High School in Mahopac, N.Y., he earned a bachelor's degree in fine arts in 1969 from the Rochester Institute of Technology and a master's degree in 1972 in fine arts from the Rhode Island School of Design.
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