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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | March 13, 1992
In "The Mambo Kings," the beat goes on, but the movie stays put.It's derived from a Pulitzer-Prize winning (and much more complex) novel by Oscar Hijuelos about two Cuban brothers who hit New York in the mid-'50s to try to catch the wave of Latino big band music as exemplified by stars named Desi, Tito and Xavier. And the movie is pure bliss when the mambo is mamboing; but it's pure bumble when the story is bumbling.The Castillo brothers -- Cesar and Nestor -- have the gift. The younger Nestor writes the songs and plays the trumpet, the older Cesar croons the songs and plays drum and piano; together, beaming fascinating rhythm, white teeth and sexual charisma, they are the showy heart of Cuban music, and kings of the Havana night-life circuit.
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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | June 30, 1995
It's Baltimore against the Great North Country all night, as the Orioles and CFL Football Club are both in action in Canada. One of the great comedy sitcom episodes of all time is also on view on cable.* "Inside Maryland" (7:30-8 p.m., MPT, Channels 22, 67) -- The weekly news magazine of regional affairs includes an interview by reporter Annette Gibbs Davis with urban planner James Rouse, designer of Baltimore's Harborplace. Why? The once-controversial waterside development is marking its 15th anniversary this year.
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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | June 30, 1995
It's Baltimore against the Great North Country all night, as the Orioles and CFL Football Club are both in action in Canada. One of the great comedy sitcom episodes of all time is also on view on cable.* "Inside Maryland" (7:30-8 p.m., MPT, Channels 22, 67) -- The weekly news magazine of regional affairs includes an interview by reporter Annette Gibbs Davis with urban planner James Rouse, designer of Baltimore's Harborplace. Why? The once-controversial waterside development is marking its 15th anniversary this year.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | September 12, 1992
"Franny's Turn," the new CBS sitcom that premieres at 8 tomorrow night on WBAL (Channel 11), is a throwback.It's a throwback to the those sitcoms of the late 1970s that were called blue collar or ethnic comedies -- "Chico and the Man," "Sanford and Son" and "Good Times." It's also a throwback all the way back to "I Love Lucy" in some ways.The series stars Miriam Margolyes as Franny, a middle-aged working woman whose consciousness suddenly starts rising much to the chagrin of her husband and two children -- a 15-year-old son (Stivi Paskoski)
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | September 12, 1992
"Franny's Turn," the new CBS sitcom that premieres at 8 tomorrow night on WBAL (Channel 11), is a throwback.It's a throwback to the those sitcoms of the late 1970s that were called blue collar or ethnic comedies -- "Chico and the Man," "Sanford and Son" and "Good Times." It's also a throwback all the way back to "I Love Lucy" in some ways.The series stars Miriam Margolyes as Franny, a middle-aged working woman whose consciousness suddenly starts rising much to the chagrin of her husband and two children -- a 15-year-old son (Stivi Paskoski)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Nancy Spiller and Nancy Spiller,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | September 4, 1992
Mambo KingsWarner Bros. (1992)"Mambo Kings" has a lot of what it takes to make a great movie -- scintillating performances, sizzling music, a hot, stylish look, a grand story that is both melancholy and as filled with life as the Latin music it features. I was shocked, then, to find out that despite rave reviews, it only made $7 million in its release last spring.Whatever it is that left it begging at the box office (too smart, too dumb, too little, too late?), the marketing powers-that-be aren't telling, they're just wrapping up the project and releasing it on video.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | March 13, 1992
In "The Mambo Kings," the beat goes on, but the movie stays put.It's derived from a Pulitzer-Prize winning (and much more complex) novel by Oscar Hijuelos about two Cuban brothers who hit New York in the mid-50s to try to catch the wave of Latino big band music as exemplified by stars named Desi, Tito and Xavier. And the movie is pure bliss when the mambo is mamboing; but it's pure bumble when the story is bumbling.The Castillo brothers -- Cesar and Nestor -- have the gift. The younger Nestor writes the songs and plays the trumpet, the older Cesar croons the songs and plays drum and piano; together, beaming fascinating rhythm, white teeth and sexual charisma, they are the showy heart of Cuban music, and kings of the Havana night-life circuit.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | February 3, 1991
Another television war begins tonight.It is a war that's more important in some ways than the gulf war to the old-line broadcast networks -- ABC, NBC and CBS.Tonight is the first big prime-time showdown of the February "sweeps" ratings period -- one of the crucial months during which audiences are measured and future advertising rates are determined.Sweeps periods are always important to the television industry. But never in recent memory has one been as significant as the month of entertainment shows that start tonight.
NEWS
January 31, 2007
BOB CARROLL JR., 87 Television writer Bob Carroll Jr., a pioneering television writer who worked on every one of Lucille Ball's TV shows, including the 1950s classic I Love Lucy, died Saturday in Los Angeles, his longtime friend Thomas Watson said. Mr. Carroll and Madelyn Pugh Davis, his writing partner, were working on comedian Steve Allen's radio show in the 1940s when they learned Ms. Ball was looking for writers for her show, My Favorite Husband. When the show moved to television in 1953, Ms. Ball brought her writers with her, changing the show's name to I Love Lucy and adding real-life husband Desi Arnaz to the cast.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | November 25, 2001
I Love Lucy: Celebrating Fifty Years of Love and Laughter, by Elisabeth Edwards (Running Press, 287 pages, $39.95) It was 50 years ago -- to be precise, Oct. 15, 1951 -- that the very first segment of I Love Lucy was broadcast by CBS. Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz proceeded to cast the immortal mold for situation comedies. There's not one on television today that does in one way or another play off that punchy, loving classic -- which in revival reruns is still fresh and, to those who like it, deathlessly enchanting.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Nancy Spiller and Nancy Spiller,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | September 4, 1992
Mambo KingsWarner Bros. (1992)"Mambo Kings" has a lot of what it takes to make a great movie -- scintillating performances, sizzling music, a hot, stylish look, a grand story that is both melancholy and as filled with life as the Latin music it features. I was shocked, then, to find out that despite rave reviews, it only made $7 million in its release last spring.Whatever it is that left it begging at the box office (too smart, too dumb, too little, too late?), the marketing powers-that-be aren't telling, they're just wrapping up the project and releasing it on video.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | March 13, 1992
In "The Mambo Kings," the beat goes on, but the movie stays put.It's derived from a Pulitzer-Prize winning (and much more complex) novel by Oscar Hijuelos about two Cuban brothers who hit New York in the mid-50s to try to catch the wave of Latino big band music as exemplified by stars named Desi, Tito and Xavier. And the movie is pure bliss when the mambo is mamboing; but it's pure bumble when the story is bumbling.The Castillo brothers -- Cesar and Nestor -- have the gift. The younger Nestor writes the songs and plays the trumpet, the older Cesar croons the songs and plays drum and piano; together, beaming fascinating rhythm, white teeth and sexual charisma, they are the showy heart of Cuban music, and kings of the Havana night-life circuit.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | March 13, 1992
In "The Mambo Kings," the beat goes on, but the movie stays put.It's derived from a Pulitzer-Prize winning (and much more complex) novel by Oscar Hijuelos about two Cuban brothers who hit New York in the mid-'50s to try to catch the wave of Latino big band music as exemplified by stars named Desi, Tito and Xavier. And the movie is pure bliss when the mambo is mamboing; but it's pure bumble when the story is bumbling.The Castillo brothers -- Cesar and Nestor -- have the gift. The younger Nestor writes the songs and plays the trumpet, the older Cesar croons the songs and plays drum and piano; together, beaming fascinating rhythm, white teeth and sexual charisma, they are the showy heart of Cuban music, and kings of the Havana night-life circuit.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | February 3, 1991
Another television war begins tonight.It is a war that's more important in some ways than the gulf war to the old-line broadcast networks -- ABC, NBC and CBS.Tonight is the first big prime-time showdown of the February "sweeps" ratings period -- one of the crucial months during which audiences are measured and future advertising rates are determined.Sweeps periods are always important to the television industry. But never in recent memory has one been as significant as the month of entertainment shows that start tonight.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach | March 11, 2007
I LOVE LUCY, THE FINAL SEASONS: 7, 8 & 9 -- Paramount Home Video / $39.95 And you thought you had finally collected all the episodes of I Love Lucy last year, with the release of the show's sixth, and final, season. Well, technically, you had. But I Love Lucy was so popular that Lucy, Ricky and the Mertzes were enticed back the next season (as well as two more seasons after that) for a series of hour-long episodes that would air whenever the CBS schedule allowed. The first Lucille Ball-Desi Arnaz Show (later renamed The Lucy-Desi Comedy Hour)
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and By Maria Blackburn,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 24, 2004
LIMITLESS CHARMS What's so charming about charm bracelets? A new book on the popular, jangling, memento-laden accessory tells all. Charmed Bracelets by Tracey Zabar (Stuart Tabori & Chang, $19.95) provides some insight into the history of these timeless accessories and a look at some of the stories behind some famous bracelets such as Lucille Ball's gold charm bracelet that celebrated the musical career of her husband, Desi Arnaz. And since Zabar is a charm bracelet designer with a client list of stars, she also includes advice on purchasing or creating your own charm bracelet.
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