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By Larry Eichel and Larry Eichel,Knight-Ridder | January 28, 1992
LONDON -- For weeks now, Britain has been paying homage to what one newspaper called "the enduring success of an absurd idea."That success is a weekly radio program, "Desert Island Discs," a quintessentially British institution that celebrated its 50th anniversary on BBC Radio 4 here Sunday. And the premise at its root, absurd as it may be, still manages to maintain its fascination for the upper crust.The celebrity guest each Sunday agrees, in effect, to play a sophisticated parlor game. The object of the game has nothing to do with winning or losing, only with self-revelation.
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ENTERTAINMENT
b staff | September 14, 2011
I wanna say thank you to the person who found my license and mailed it back to me. Good to know somebody here has common sense. Have you noticed Subway commercials always make it look so good? And advertisers on the radio talk about “meat piled up,” but when you get there, they don't want to give you any meat. Am I the only one seeing this? C'mon, Subway, we need more meat. Quiznos, here I come. The end of the world scenario I most fear is being stuck on a desert island with John-John Williams.
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FEATURES
By Bruce Jackson | May 1, 1994
The memo said all English professors were to list five books undergraduates ought to have read, along with brief justifications. Responses would be printed and distributed on the campus.Simple enough. I can think of plenty of books undergraduates ought to have read. That was the rub: dozens, then scores, then what seemed a limitless number of important or wonderful titles passed before my mind's eye. Whatever five books I selected, my colleagues were sure to say, "Jackson, how could you have left out X and Y and Z?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2011
"Contagion" hits theaters Friday, so we asked staff: Which end-of-the-world scenario do you most fear? •••• Human cloning + Kardashians.  Luke Broadwater, managing editor,  b •••• I think I would most fear an invasion by aliens who use us as appetizers, employ us as shuttlecocks for games of badminton, or otherwise cramp our style.  Anne Tallent, editor,  b •••• The one where everyone gets...
ENTERTAINMENT
b staff | September 14, 2011
I wanna say thank you to the person who found my license and mailed it back to me. Good to know somebody here has common sense. Have you noticed Subway commercials always make it look so good? And advertisers on the radio talk about “meat piled up,” but when you get there, they don't want to give you any meat. Am I the only one seeing this? C'mon, Subway, we need more meat. Quiznos, here I come. The end of the world scenario I most fear is being stuck on a desert island with John-John Williams.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | January 23, 1994
The history of collecting is littered with unfathomable excess. From Imelda Marcos' shoes to Margaret Woodbury Strong, who collected bathtubs (but was never known to take a bath), there are people who collect with such obsessive repetition that one can scarcely believe they're human.Among the common manifestations of this phenomenon are those who collect moments that exist at the vanishing point, but are captured on video and sound recordings. There are times when I look about my house and am astonished to see the history of Western music collected four times over.
BUSINESS
By Herb Greenberg and Herb Greenberg,Chronicle Features | March 15, 1991
Some economic indicators are better than others. Mitchell Held, Smith Barney's chief financial economist, has a strong opinion on the subject, so strong that he recently headlined a report, "Three Economic Indicators to Take With You Should You Be Stranded on a Desert Island."OK, so the economy and its chances for recovery may be the last thing on your mind if you're stranded on a desert island. But these indicators have worked well for Held, who says: "They'll pick up acceleration or deceleration in the economy two-thirds of the time, which is better than many economists can do."
TRAVEL
May 28, 2000
MY BEST SHOT Gate to old Mexico By Bob Klempa, Millersville Campeche is a 40-square-block city on Mexico's Gulf coast surrounded by walls originally built to defend against marauding pirates targeting Spanish settlements. Entering through the Sea Gate, you see that the city is alive with color and accented by cobblestone streets. The building facades are decorative with a myriad of bright colors. A MEMORABLE PLACE A second home in Maine By Niki Harris SPECIAL TO THE SUN I never dreamed that life would change when my husband and I set out to drive our 1983 RV to Maine last August.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | November 3, 2002
A Memorable Place On an island with a special someone By Victoria Hecht SPECIAL TO THE SUN It would be stretching things to say that I had left Baltimore and come to Cumberland Island, Ga., as a result of a sale on hair color at my local CVS, but there is a connection. I had run into the pharmacy one snowy evening last January to make a single purchase, but upon seeing a line at the register, ended up flipping through the latest issue of Travel & Leisure magazine as I waited. An article caught my attention -- "A Beach for Every Month" -- with photos of 12 shimmering beaches, each one paired with its ideal calendar month.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | March 3, 2004
Youth and age met face to face across tables set up at the American Visionary Art Museum yesterday afternoon for a national pilot program that seeks to show medical students in their 20s that old age can be an artistic time in life. Fourteen Baltimore seniors, all healthy and ranging in age from 68 to 86, each paired off with a first-year Johns Hopkins School of Medicine student for the first session of a National Institute on Aging project, titled the Vital Visionaries Collaboration. The idea is to give medical students greater experience and insight into old age. Creative interaction with senior citizens can make students better caregivers in their careers as doctors, officials said.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | March 3, 2004
Youth and age met face to face across tables set up at the American Visionary Art Museum yesterday afternoon for a national pilot program that seeks to show medical students in their 20s that old age can be an artistic time in life. Fourteen Baltimore seniors, all healthy and ranging in age from 68 to 86, each paired off with a first-year Johns Hopkins School of Medicine student for the first session of a National Institute on Aging project, titled the Vital Visionaries Collaboration. The idea is to give medical students greater experience and insight into old age. Creative interaction with senior citizens can make students better caregivers in their careers as doctors, officials said.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | November 3, 2002
A Memorable Place On an island with a special someone By Victoria Hecht SPECIAL TO THE SUN It would be stretching things to say that I had left Baltimore and come to Cumberland Island, Ga., as a result of a sale on hair color at my local CVS, but there is a connection. I had run into the pharmacy one snowy evening last January to make a single purchase, but upon seeing a line at the register, ended up flipping through the latest issue of Travel & Leisure magazine as I waited. An article caught my attention -- "A Beach for Every Month" -- with photos of 12 shimmering beaches, each one paired with its ideal calendar month.
TRAVEL
May 28, 2000
MY BEST SHOT Gate to old Mexico By Bob Klempa, Millersville Campeche is a 40-square-block city on Mexico's Gulf coast surrounded by walls originally built to defend against marauding pirates targeting Spanish settlements. Entering through the Sea Gate, you see that the city is alive with color and accented by cobblestone streets. The building facades are decorative with a myriad of bright colors. A MEMORABLE PLACE A second home in Maine By Niki Harris SPECIAL TO THE SUN I never dreamed that life would change when my husband and I set out to drive our 1983 RV to Maine last August.
FEATURES
By Sarah Pekkanen and Sarah Pekkanen,SUN STAFF | January 11, 2000
If you were about to be dropped on a deserted island and could bring only one thing, what would it be? More than your survival is riding on your answer. The right item could also be worth a million bucks -- but we'll get to that in a minute. Sandra Kaufmann is considering the merits of aluminum foil: "It's light, reflective, you can cook in it, and make cups, and use it to attract fish -- they like shiny things -- and if you had lots of it, you could waterproof a house." Kaufmann has clearly given this a lot of thought, and for good reason: She might actually be sent to a tropical island in the South China Sea. If she can last 39 days, she might win the million bucks.
FEATURES
By Les Picker and Les Picker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 24, 1998
"I am convinced that there is no air in the world like the air of Maine."- Mrs. John D. Rockefeller, writing from Bar Harbor in 1944Standing at the summit of Sargent Mountain, deep in the heart of Acadia National Park on Mount Desert Island, Maine, I am conscious of every breath I take. It is an early summer morning, I've been hiking since daybreak, and the dense fog is just beginning to burn off, helped by the stiff ocean breezes coming up the mountain from Frenchman's Bay.Each breath is laden with scents so thick you can taste them on the back of your throat.
FEATURES
By Arline Bleecker and Arline Bleecker,ORLANDO SENTINEL | September 24, 1995
If cruising to the desert sounds like a physical impossibility, consider the Sea of Cortez -- a region where an environmental phenomenon has made the impossible possible. It's where the desert meets the sea -- literally.More than 50 desert islands dot the 700-mile sea.Millions of years ago, a shift in the San Andreas fault ripped what is now Baja California from the flank of mainland Mexico. When the Pacific rushed in to fill the gap, it created the Sea of Cortez, or the Gulf of California.
FEATURES
By Les Picker and Les Picker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 24, 1998
"I am convinced that there is no air in the world like the air of Maine."- Mrs. John D. Rockefeller, writing from Bar Harbor in 1944Standing at the summit of Sargent Mountain, deep in the heart of Acadia National Park on Mount Desert Island, Maine, I am conscious of every breath I take. It is an early summer morning, I've been hiking since daybreak, and the dense fog is just beginning to burn off, helped by the stiff ocean breezes coming up the mountain from Frenchman's Bay.Each breath is laden with scents so thick you can taste them on the back of your throat.
FEATURES
By Arline Bleecker and Arline Bleecker,ORLANDO SENTINEL | September 24, 1995
If cruising to the desert sounds like a physical impossibility, consider the Sea of Cortez -- a region where an environmental phenomenon has made the impossible possible. It's where the desert meets the sea -- literally.More than 50 desert islands dot the 700-mile sea.Millions of years ago, a shift in the San Andreas fault ripped what is now Baja California from the flank of mainland Mexico. When the Pacific rushed in to fill the gap, it created the Sea of Cortez, or the Gulf of California.
FEATURES
By Bruce Jackson | May 1, 1994
The memo said all English professors were to list five books undergraduates ought to have read, along with brief justifications. Responses would be printed and distributed on the campus.Simple enough. I can think of plenty of books undergraduates ought to have read. That was the rub: dozens, then scores, then what seemed a limitless number of important or wonderful titles passed before my mind's eye. Whatever five books I selected, my colleagues were sure to say, "Jackson, how could you have left out X and Y and Z?
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | January 23, 1994
The history of collecting is littered with unfathomable excess. From Imelda Marcos' shoes to Margaret Woodbury Strong, who collected bathtubs (but was never known to take a bath), there are people who collect with such obsessive repetition that one can scarcely believe they're human.Among the common manifestations of this phenomenon are those who collect moments that exist at the vanishing point, but are captured on video and sound recordings. There are times when I look about my house and am astonished to see the history of Western music collected four times over.
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