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Desegregation

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NEWS
April 27, 1995
TOWSON -- The Baltimore County school board has adopted a voluntary desegregation plan as a prerequisite to applying for a $10 million federal grant that would be used for four of next year's new magnet school programs.The resolution adopted at Tuesday night's board meeting concedes that the county has schools with minority enrollments exceeding 50 percent of the student body and that magnet schools have been effective in reducing such isolation voluntarily. The three-year grant would be used for programs at the Halstead Academy, now Hillendale Elementary; Loch Raven and Deer Park middle schools; and Southwest Academy at Johnnycake Middle School.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
The International Longshoremen's Association is investigating the largest dockworker union at the port of Baltimore over racially tinged allegations that local leaders stacked its membership in advance of coming local elections. Two members of the ILA executive council convened meetings in Baltimore this week to investigate the grievances filed by members of Baltimore's Local 333, confirmed Jim McNamara, a national ILA spokesman. The hearings occurred as two senior ILA officials, including Atlantic Coast District President Dennis Daggett, met in Baltimore this week with representatives of the Steamship Trade Association of Baltimore and the United States Maritime Association, or USMX, to continue local contract negotiations for Local 333. The two associations represent port shippers that employ ILA labor.
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NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,Sun Reporter | July 28, 2008
Federal civil rights officials inspected several Baltimore-area colleges last week, the first clear indication in two years that the U.S. Education Department's Office for Civil Rights might be approaching a decision on whether Maryland has satisfied its obligations under a five-year desegregation plan that ended in 2005. Maryland is one of only seven states that have not yet fulfilled federal goals of eliminating the vestiges of separate public college systems for black and white students.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | November 17, 2013
Those familiar with my life story understand my emotional approach to educational opportunity - particularly where the story line ends in opportunity denied. Simply put, I got lucky at a tender age. Enough athletic and academic prowess, in addition to scholarship aid, gave me the opportunity to attend excellent schools. These institutions set me on a successful path; each afforded me unlimited opportunities and important relationships that I have taken advantage of throughout my life.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | November 14, 1991
WASHINGTON -- State universities that once were segregated by race -- like Maryland's -- could wind up with a broader duty to wipe out lingering effects of their past bias, if hints emerging at a Supreme Court hearing yesterday are translated into a decision.Three justices whose votes may control the outcome of a historic test case on college desegregation asked questions that implied strong skepticism of the idea that the Constitution would be satisfied if colleges simply embraced race neutrality as a policy and stopped with that.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | August 23, 2011
Anthony K. Konstant, a civil rights advocate and restaurateur who led the way in desegregating restaurants on U.S. 40 in northeast Maryland and later owned the landmark Williamsburg Inn in White Marsh for many years, died Friday of heart failure at Oak Crest Village in Parkville. The former White Marsh resident was 87. The son of Greek immigrant restaurateurs, Mr. Konstant was born in Grand Rapids, Mich., and moved in the 1930s with his parents to Hollins Street in Southwest Baltimore, and then to Bel Air. He was a 1941 graduate of Bel Air High School and enlisted in the Navy during World War II, where he was a gunner's mate and participated in the invasion of the Philippines and Okinawa and in the occupation of Japan.
NEWS
May 29, 2001
In 1990, Columbia resident M. Hillery Scavo wrote a thesis about Leola May Moore Dorsey for her B. A. degree in Women's Studies in at UMBC. Dorsey, 83, a devout Christian and civil rights activist, was born in Guilford and continues to live there. This is an excerpt from the unpublished thesis. In May of 1947, Leola Dorsey became president of the newly formed (Howard County) chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. The NAACP was organized in New York City in 1909, and the first attempt to form a chapter in Howard County in 1944 failed ... [according to "History of Blacks in Howard County, Maryland," by Cornelison, A. H., Craft, S. E., and Price, L., published in 1986 by the NAACP]
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | November 17, 2013
Those familiar with my life story understand my emotional approach to educational opportunity - particularly where the story line ends in opportunity denied. Simply put, I got lucky at a tender age. Enough athletic and academic prowess, in addition to scholarship aid, gave me the opportunity to attend excellent schools. These institutions set me on a successful path; each afforded me unlimited opportunities and important relationships that I have taken advantage of throughout my life.
NEWS
March 19, 2006
Desegregation On March 12, 1963 - nearly nine years after the U.S. Supreme Court's landmark school desegregation ruling in Brown v. Board of Education - the Howard County school board unanimously approved this regulation: "That the twelfth grade of the Public Schools of Howard County be desegregated with the opening of the 1963 fall school term." [Source: Board of Education proceedings, as quoted in History of Blacks in Howard County, by Alice Cornelison, Silas E. Craft Sr. and Lillie Price.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | January 12, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Four decades after ordering an end to racial segregation of public schools, the Supreme Court reached one of the last unsettled issues yesterday. It took up the question of whether students must actually do better in school before desegregation can be considered successful.The answer will affect school desegregation in Prince George's County, and in scores of cities and counties across the nation.At a hearing yesterday on a Kansas City, Mo., case, Justice Stephen G. Breyer suggested that courts perhaps should be free to ask if students can read as a test of "whether desegregation works."
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2013
During a weekend gathering of black alumni from the University of Maryland Law School in which the continuing inequalities faced by African-Americans was discussed, one participant called for Baltimore to preserve the city's tradition of public pools. UM law professor Taunya Lovell Banks presented Saturday new work on the civil rights history of swimming in Baltimore and questioned whether Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake is doing enough to keep the pools open and available. "Like mayors before her, when it's time to do budget cuts, the first think they look at are parks," said Banks.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2013
The wooden roller coaster and the Dixie Ballroom are long gone. Gone, too, from Gwynn Oak Park is the merry-go-round where a toddler in a pink dress took a historic spin on a summer afternoon a half-century ago. That simple pleasure, a first for a black child at the formerly segregated Gwynn Oak Amusement Park, had become possible just weeks earlier in 1963 when hundreds of black and white protesters thrust Baltimore into the national spotlight...
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | August 23, 2011
Anthony K. Konstant, a civil rights advocate and restaurateur who led the way in desegregating restaurants on U.S. 40 in northeast Maryland and later owned the landmark Williamsburg Inn in White Marsh for many years, died Friday of heart failure at Oak Crest Village in Parkville. The former White Marsh resident was 87. The son of Greek immigrant restaurateurs, Mr. Konstant was born in Grand Rapids, Mich., and moved in the 1930s with his parents to Hollins Street in Southwest Baltimore, and then to Bel Air. He was a 1941 graduate of Bel Air High School and enlisted in the Navy during World War II, where he was a gunner's mate and participated in the invasion of the Philippines and Okinawa and in the occupation of Japan.
NEWS
October 12, 2010
The new union contract Baltimore City teachers are voting on Wednesday and Thursday has the potential to radically change the nature of public education not only for city schoolchildren but for students in school districts across the state. It would immediately thrust Baltimore into the forefront of school reform efforts nationally and provide a model for others to emulate that represents a bold departure from the past. A success of that magnitude here would force neighboring jurisdictions to adopt similar changes or risk a brain drain of talented teachers, who would flock to Baltimore for higher salaries and the chance to really make a difference in young people's lives.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2010
Louise Pearl "Cavi" Cavagnaro, a former World War II Army nurse and longtime Johns Hopkins Hospital administrator who helped end racial segregation at the East Baltimore hospital, died Thursday from complications of dementia at Roland Park Place. She was 90. Miss Cavagnaro, the daughter of Italian immigrant parents, was born and raised in Portland, Ore., where she graduated in 1937 from Franklin High School. After earning her nursing degree from Oregon Health Services University — now part of the University of Oregon — she enlisted in the Army in 1943.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,nicole.fuller@baltsun.com | October 14, 2009
Philip L. Brown Sr., an educator and civil rights pioneer whose efforts in Anne Arundel County helped lay the groundwork for the desegregation of the nation's public schools, died Friday at his home in Annapolis, according to family members. He was 100. Mr. Brown, who worked as a teacher and administrator in the county schools for more than 40 years, was part of a lawsuit pushing for equal pay for African-American teachers in Anne Arundel. Thurgood Marshall, then an attorney for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, represented the black teachers and won the case in federal court in Baltimore in 1940.
NEWS
By Erwin Chemerinsky and Charles Clotfelter | July 5, 2007
American public schools are becoming increasingly separate and unequal, and last week's Supreme Court decision invalidating desegregation plans in Seattle and Louisville, Ky., will hasten this process. Three-quarters of African-American and Latino schoolchildren attend predominantly minority schools, and white children are even more likely to attend racially isolated schools. School districts across the country have adopted plans to decrease segregation, and many of these plans are now vulnerable to legal challenge.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,Sun Reporter | July 28, 2008
Federal civil rights officials inspected several Baltimore-area colleges last week, the first clear indication in two years that the U.S. Education Department's Office for Civil Rights might be approaching a decision on whether Maryland has satisfied its obligations under a five-year desegregation plan that ended in 2005. Maryland is one of only seven states that have not yet fulfilled federal goals of eliminating the vestiges of separate public college systems for black and white students.
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