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By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1999
Maryland's watermen, whose oyster season begins today, are caught between the good news of a fast-growing oyster population and the bad news of the summer drought, weather perfect for diseases that kill oysters.The oysters produced in the near-record spat set of 1997 are reaching marketable size, and they are producing even more oysters, said Chris Judy, head of shellfish programs at the Maryland Department of Natural Resources. The saltier water in the Chesapeake Bay resulting from the lack of rain encouraged oyster reproduction.
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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2014
Maryland's depleted oyster population has more than doubled since 2010, state officials reported Wednesday, giving state scientists hope the bivalves are on track to regain a "substantial foothold" in the Chesapeake Bay after being devastated by diseases over the past 30 years. An annual fall survey by the Department of Natural Resources found that the number and size of oysters dredged up from more than 250 longtime oyster bars had increased for the third straight year. The oyster "biomass index," as it's known, has reached the highest level measured since around the time the bay's bivalves began to be ravaged by two parasitic diseases.
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NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | November 19, 2002
Chesapeake Bay oysters -- ravaged by drought and disease -- are becoming so scarce that state biologists expect this year's harvest to be the smallest since Maryland began keeping records in 1870. Biologists completing a survey of the oyster population this week blame the decline on a three-year drought that has created a saltier bay and a favorable habitat for the diseases that have been killing oysters for decades. "We're seeing diseases literally robbing the bay of the oysters," said Christopher Judy, director of the state Department of Natural Resources' shellfish division.
NEWS
December 18, 2012
Oyster dressing, oyster stew, oyster pie, oysters Rockefeller, oysters on the half-shell, fried oysters, scalloped oysters, smoked oysters, oyster shooters. Before anyone gets too carried away with the latest news about the Chesapeake Bay's oyster harvest this season and plans a lifetime of gluttony - much as Bubba Blue, Forrest Gump's Army pal, so enthusiastically recalled shrimp recipes - some caution is in order. The good news is that the oyster harvest is up - spectacularly, by modern standards.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Heather Dewar and Ted Shelsby and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2000
Marine scientists have identified a new parasite in the Chesapeake Bay that may be a major factor in the sharp decline of the state's soft-shell clam population. The microscopic creature, which scientists dubbed Perkinsus Chesapeaki on Tuesday, is closely related to Perkinsus marinus, or Dermo, a pest that has devastated Chesapeake Bay oysters for the past 20 years. Dermo and Perkinsus Chesapeaki were found in clams taken from 10 sites in the upper bay between 1990 and 1998. Scientists studying the new parasite say they aren't sure whether it can kill soft-shell clams, the variety that Maryland clam dredgers rely on for their catch.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Staff Writer | April 30, 1993
Scientists say a seemingly minor laboratory breakthrough has raised new hopes that science might yet find a cure for one of the diseases that is lethal to the oyster -- that beloved bivalve so integral to the health of the Chesapeake Bay.For 40 years, scientists couldn't find a way to grow the disease-causing Dermo parasite in their laboratories.Without that ability, the chance for further scientific understanding of the disease was blocked. Researchers were left watching Dermo and a second disease, MSX, spread up the Chesapeake Bay, destroying vast areas that had once supported a large industry.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun Staff Writer | November 20, 1994
Two straight years of wet spring weather have loosened the stranglehold of parasitic diseases on oysters in the Chesapeake Bay, prompting watermen and state officials to predict a rebound from Maryland's slumping harvests.With watermen now catching oysters in parts of the Chesapeake that have yielded almost nothing for nearly a decade, state officials talk optimistically about doubling last year's record-low harvest of 79,568 bushels.Maryland has embarked on a broad effort to restore the oyster industry, including the raising of disease-free shellfish in a state-run hatchery.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Evening Sun Staff | October 31, 1991
Parasitic oyster diseases, apparently aided by last winter's warm temperatures and the summer's drought, are again devastating shellfish beds in Maryland's portion of Chesapeake Bay, say watermen and state officials.Preliminary surveys indicate that oyster bars in the lower bay, in the Patuxent River and in some tributaries of the Potomac River have lost the vast majority of their oysters, W. Peter Jensen, fisheries director for the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, said yesterday.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | February 26, 2004
The Asian oyster touted as a replacement for the vanishing Chesapeake Bay species is a host to parasites in Chinese and Japanese waters similar to one that has already decimated the native oyster, scientists reported yesterday. Researchers from the Virginia Institute of Marine Science said genetic and microscopic studies of the Asian bivalves have identified two Perkinsus parasites related to the microbe that produces deadly dermo infections in bay oysters, plus a herpes virus that could threaten oyster hatcheries.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Staff Writer | April 1, 1993
The caption for an oystering photo on Page 1A of The Sun yesterday said that the photo was taken Wednesday. It was taken Monday.The Sun regrets the errors.The worst oyster season in Maryland history ended with a whimper yesterday.Many workboats remained at their docks, and scientists wondered if the fabled Chesapeake Bay shellfish can ever recover from the effects of disease, over-harvesting and pollution."I can't really see us having a public fishery to speak about," said Dr. Roger I. E. Newell, an oyster researcher at the University of Maryland's Horn Point Environmental Laboratory near Cambridge.
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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2011
A new scientific study recommends halting all commercial harvest of oysters in Maryland, warning that the ecologically important bivalves are even more depleted than previously believed and that continuing to catch them risks eliminating them altogether from much of the upper Chesapeake Bay. The study, led by researchers with the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, concludes that the oyster population in Maryland's portion of...
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2011
The Chesapeake Bay's beleaguered oyster population spawned a bumper crop of babies last year, state officials announced Monday, and there are signs that the diseases that have ravaged the bay's bivalves for more than two decades might have loosened their stranglehold. Gov. Martin O'Malley heralded the "exciting new evidence" from the state's recently completed survey of Maryland waters, adding in a statement that there is "reason to be more optimistic than ever about the recovery of this iconic species.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | February 26, 2004
The Asian oyster touted as a replacement for the vanishing Chesapeake Bay species is a host to parasites in Chinese and Japanese waters similar to one that has already decimated the native oyster, scientists reported yesterday. Researchers from the Virginia Institute of Marine Science said genetic and microscopic studies of the Asian bivalves have identified two Perkinsus parasites related to the microbe that produces deadly dermo infections in bay oysters, plus a herpes virus that could threaten oyster hatcheries.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | November 19, 2002
Chesapeake Bay oysters -- ravaged by drought and disease -- are becoming so scarce that state biologists expect this year's harvest to be the smallest since Maryland began keeping records in 1870. Biologists completing a survey of the oyster population this week blame the decline on a three-year drought that has created a saltier bay and a favorable habitat for the diseases that have been killing oysters for decades. "We're seeing diseases literally robbing the bay of the oysters," said Christopher Judy, director of the state Department of Natural Resources' shellfish division.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | March 26, 2002
Maryland's oyster harvest for the season that ends Sunday is expected to be only 120,000 bushels - about one-third of last year's catch and the second-worst since recordkeeping began in 1870, state fishery managers say. A state scientist blamed two oyster parasites, MSX and Dermo, which thrive when Chesapeake Bay waters become super-salty. "Both of them are worse when we get higher salinity, and we've now had two, going on three years of drought," said Stephen Jordan, director of the state's Cooperative Oxford Laboratory.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Heather Dewar and Ted Shelsby and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2000
Marine scientists have identified a new parasite in the Chesapeake Bay that may be a major factor in the sharp decline of the state's soft-shell clam population. The microscopic creature, which scientists dubbed Perkinsus Chesapeaki on Tuesday, is closely related to Perkinsus marinus, or Dermo, a pest that has devastated Chesapeake Bay oysters for the past 20 years. Dermo and Perkinsus Chesapeaki were found in clams taken from 10 sites in the upper bay between 1990 and 1998. Scientists studying the new parasite say they aren't sure whether it can kill soft-shell clams, the variety that Maryland clam dredgers rely on for their catch.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | January 6, 2000
Nearly all of 2,000 oysters sampled by state scientists in October were infected with Dermo, one of two diseases that ravaged the Chesapeake Bay oyster population in the early 1990s. But oysters are surviving at greater rates than in 1992 and 1993, the years of record low harvests, suggesting they are becoming more tolerant of the disease, said Steve Jordan, head of the state Department of Natural Resources' laboratory in Oxford. "If this holds up, we'll be encouraged," he said. DNR crews dredged samples from oyster bars from Poole's Island to the mouth of the Potomac River over about four weeks to get a picture of the oyster population.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | January 6, 2000
Nearly all of 2,000 oysters sampled by state scientists in October were infected with Dermo, one of two diseases that ravaged the Chesapeake Bay oyster population in the early 1990s. But oysters are surviving at greater rates than in 1992 and 1993, the years of record low harvests, suggesting they are becoming more tolerant of the disease, said Steve Jordan, head of the state Department of Natural Resources' laboratory in Oxford. "If this holds up, we'll be encouraged," he said. DNR crews dredged samples from oyster bars from Poole's Island to the mouth of the Potomac River over about four weeks to get a picture of the oyster population.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1999
Maryland's watermen, whose oyster season begins today, are caught between the good news of a fast-growing oyster population and the bad news of the summer drought, weather perfect for diseases that kill oysters.The oysters produced in the near-record spat set of 1997 are reaching marketable size, and they are producing even more oysters, said Chris Judy, head of shellfish programs at the Maryland Department of Natural Resources. The saltier water in the Chesapeake Bay resulting from the lack of rain encouraged oyster reproduction.
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