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NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 13, 2005
I was in the hospital for knee surgery and got a terrible rash on my back. The nurses said it was probably from chemicals used to launder the sheets. Is this true? It could be. These rashes happen "with enough frequency that we do see it. They're often due to the high amounts of bleach and whitening agents in the detergent" used in hospital laundering, said Dr. John Williams, a dermatologist at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. Commercial laundries use much harsher chemicals than people use at home, he said, and these agents can cause contact dermatitis, a rash that in most cases is simply a reaction to an irritating substance but 20 percent of the time is a genuine allergic reaction, in which immune cells gear up to fight the offending substance.
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SPORTS
Sports Digest | June 11, 2013
Administration UMBC's Brown wins Under Armour AD of the Year Award UMBC athletic director Charles Brown has been named a Division I-AAA Under Armour Athletics Director of the Year Award recipient by the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics. Brown will be honored at the NACDA and Affiliates Convention Week on June 15 at the World Center Marriott Resort in Orlando, Fla. The Under Armour AD of the Year Award was created to honor intercollegiate athletics directors for their commitment and administrative excellence within a campus or college community environment.
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NEWS
December 8, 2003
Dr. John A. Kenney Jr., 89, a leading specialist in dermatological conditions afflicting African-Americans, died Nov. 29 of heart failure at his home in Washington. Dr. Kenney was one of the first black doctors to be formally trained in dermatology and developed the dermatology department of Howard University's College of Medicine into a major research center, said Dr. William E. Matory, a surgeon and the director of continuing medical education at the National Medical Association, an organization of black physicians.
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2013
The Johns Hopkins Department of Dermatology, in partnership with The Kropfelder Foundation for Melanoma Education and Research, has teamed up with Ripken Baseball to help eradicate skin cancer, according to a news release. On Saturday, Johns Hopkins dermatologists will provide complimentary skin screenings at the Ripken Baseball complex in Aberdeen during the Father's Day weekend baseball tournament. Players, coaches, and family members will have the opportunity to get a free cancer screening and learn about ways to prevent skin cancer.
NEWS
February 27, 1991
Dr. Lawrence Katzenstein, a dermatologist whose early years as a physician were spent in Baltimore, died of pneumonia Feb. 15 at a hospital in Wilmington, Del. He was 82.Dr. Katzenstein, who lived in Bellevue, Del., was a former chief of dermatology at two Wilmington hospitals. He was a member of several professional societies, including the American Academy of Dermatology.He was a 1932 graduate of the University of Virginia and a 1936 graduate of the University of Maryland Medical School.
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2013
The Johns Hopkins Department of Dermatology, in partnership with The Kropfelder Foundation for Melanoma Education and Research, has teamed up with Ripken Baseball to help eradicate skin cancer, according to a news release. On Saturday, Johns Hopkins dermatologists will provide complimentary skin screenings at the Ripken Baseball complex in Aberdeen during the Father's Day weekend baseball tournament. Players, coaches, and family members will have the opportunity to get a free cancer screening and learn about ways to prevent skin cancer.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | March 22, 2010
Dr. Albert Shapiro, a retired Baltimore dermatologist and a former longtime Pikesville resident, died March 12 in his sleep at the Noreen McKeen Residences in West Palm Beach, Fla. He was 96. Dr. Shapiro, the son of a businessman and a homemaker, was born in Somerville, Mass., and spent his early years in nearby Chelsea. In 1921 he moved with his family to Baltimore, where he graduated from City College in 1931. He graduated from the University of Maryland Medical School in 1937 and completed postgraduate training in dermatology at New York University's Skin and Cancer College.
FEATURES
By Roy H. Campbell and Roy H. Campbell,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | July 31, 1991
PHILADELPHIA Betty Ann Stewart, 43, a nurse who lives in Cherry Hill, loves wearing makeup. But she hates applying it each day. So recently, Stewart did what hundreds of women nationwide have done.She opted for permanent makeup.Now Stewart's lips glisten with color that doesn't rub off, her eyeliner will never smudge, and her eyebrows, once plucked out of existence, are thick-looking and jet-black.And it only cost her $1,600."I love it," said Stewart, soon after undergoing a controversial new procedure in which microdots of pigment (color)
SPORTS
Sports Digest | June 11, 2013
Administration UMBC's Brown wins Under Armour AD of the Year Award UMBC athletic director Charles Brown has been named a Division I-AAA Under Armour Athletics Director of the Year Award recipient by the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics. Brown will be honored at the NACDA and Affiliates Convention Week on June 15 at the World Center Marriott Resort in Orlando, Fla. The Under Armour AD of the Year Award was created to honor intercollegiate athletics directors for their commitment and administrative excellence within a campus or college community environment.
NEWS
By JONATHAN PITTS and JONATHAN PITTS,SUN REPORTER | May 5, 2006
The round table in Dr. Christoph Lehmann's office is piled high with papers. In the back, another physician taps at a keyboard, crunching numbers for a scholarly article on their most recent study in informatics -- the application of computer science to medicine. With his short sleeves, rimless glasses and restlessly observant eyes, Lehmann is at home in this cramped academic setting -- fitting for a man who has spent his career working in disciplines as diverse as skin disease, neonatal medicine and computer programming.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | March 22, 2010
Dr. Albert Shapiro, a retired Baltimore dermatologist and a former longtime Pikesville resident, died March 12 in his sleep at the Noreen McKeen Residences in West Palm Beach, Fla. He was 96. Dr. Shapiro, the son of a businessman and a homemaker, was born in Somerville, Mass., and spent his early years in nearby Chelsea. In 1921 he moved with his family to Baltimore, where he graduated from City College in 1931. He graduated from the University of Maryland Medical School in 1937 and completed postgraduate training in dermatology at New York University's Skin and Cancer College.
NEWS
By JONATHAN PITTS and JONATHAN PITTS,SUN REPORTER | May 5, 2006
The round table in Dr. Christoph Lehmann's office is piled high with papers. In the back, another physician taps at a keyboard, crunching numbers for a scholarly article on their most recent study in informatics -- the application of computer science to medicine. With his short sleeves, rimless glasses and restlessly observant eyes, Lehmann is at home in this cramped academic setting -- fitting for a man who has spent his career working in disciplines as diverse as skin disease, neonatal medicine and computer programming.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | June 5, 2005
What's the best way to get rid of ticks? When I go hiking in the woods, I constantly find ticks crawling on my body. I don't want to let them loose again to bite someone else. Is there a simple way to kill them that's not too toxic? A forest ranger once told us that he takes along a roll of Scotch tape. Whenever he finds a tick he just encloses it in the tape, sticks it in his pocket and when he gets home he throws the tape in the trash. This seems like a simple and safe way to entomb and dispose of these dangerous critters that can transmit diseases.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 13, 2005
I was in the hospital for knee surgery and got a terrible rash on my back. The nurses said it was probably from chemicals used to launder the sheets. Is this true? It could be. These rashes happen "with enough frequency that we do see it. They're often due to the high amounts of bleach and whitening agents in the detergent" used in hospital laundering, said Dr. John Williams, a dermatologist at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. Commercial laundries use much harsher chemicals than people use at home, he said, and these agents can cause contact dermatitis, a rash that in most cases is simply a reaction to an irritating substance but 20 percent of the time is a genuine allergic reaction, in which immune cells gear up to fight the offending substance.
NEWS
December 8, 2003
Dr. John A. Kenney Jr., 89, a leading specialist in dermatological conditions afflicting African-Americans, died Nov. 29 of heart failure at his home in Washington. Dr. Kenney was one of the first black doctors to be formally trained in dermatology and developed the dermatology department of Howard University's College of Medicine into a major research center, said Dr. William E. Matory, a surgeon and the director of continuing medical education at the National Medical Association, an organization of black physicians.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 11, 2000
Dr. William J. R. Dunseath Sr., who was chief of dermatology at the old St. Joseph Hospital in Towson for 33 years, died Saturday of cardiac arrest at his Homeland residence. He was 77. Before retiring in 1996, Dr. Dunseath also maintained a private practice in the St. Joseph Professional Building for many years. He was a former member of the staff of the Johns Hopkins Hospital. His professional memberships included the Lister Society, the Splint Club, the Rush Medical Club and the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | June 5, 2005
What's the best way to get rid of ticks? When I go hiking in the woods, I constantly find ticks crawling on my body. I don't want to let them loose again to bite someone else. Is there a simple way to kill them that's not too toxic? A forest ranger once told us that he takes along a roll of Scotch tape. Whenever he finds a tick he just encloses it in the tape, sticks it in his pocket and when he gets home he throws the tape in the trash. This seems like a simple and safe way to entomb and dispose of these dangerous critters that can transmit diseases.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 11, 2000
Dr. William J. R. Dunseath Sr., who was chief of dermatology at the old St. Joseph Hospital in Towson for 33 years, died Saturday of cardiac arrest at his Homeland residence. He was 77. Before retiring in 1996, Dr. Dunseath also maintained a private practice in the St. Joseph Professional Building for many years. He was a former member of the staff of the Johns Hopkins Hospital. His professional memberships included the Lister Society, the Splint Club, the Rush Medical Club and the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland.
FEATURES
By Roy H. Campbell and Roy H. Campbell,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | July 31, 1991
PHILADELPHIA Betty Ann Stewart, 43, a nurse who lives in Cherry Hill, loves wearing makeup. But she hates applying it each day. So recently, Stewart did what hundreds of women nationwide have done.She opted for permanent makeup.Now Stewart's lips glisten with color that doesn't rub off, her eyeliner will never smudge, and her eyebrows, once plucked out of existence, are thick-looking and jet-black.And it only cost her $1,600."I love it," said Stewart, soon after undergoing a controversial new procedure in which microdots of pigment (color)
NEWS
February 27, 1991
Dr. Lawrence Katzenstein, a dermatologist whose early years as a physician were spent in Baltimore, died of pneumonia Feb. 15 at a hospital in Wilmington, Del. He was 82.Dr. Katzenstein, who lived in Bellevue, Del., was a former chief of dermatology at two Wilmington hospitals. He was a member of several professional societies, including the American Academy of Dermatology.He was a 1932 graduate of the University of Virginia and a 1936 graduate of the University of Maryland Medical School.
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