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By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff Writer | December 1, 1992
A metal, clam-shell shovel crashed through the rotting deck of the derelict schooner, closed and pulled away the rotting debris.Splinter by splinter, the 60-foot boat, which had sunk in Anne Arundel's Rock Creek a year ago, was dismantled yesterday. Its final voyage to the Millersville landfill is slated for later this week.Bob Orem, an official with the state Department of Natural Resources who supervised the demolition, cringed a little every time the heavy shovel tore into the custom-built, handcrafted hull.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2013
After months of investigation, military authorities charged four sailors Wednesday in the deaths of two Navy divers at the "Super Pond" at Aberdeen Proving Ground. Chief Warrant Officer 3rd Class Jason M. Bennett, Senior Chief Navy Diver James C. Burger, Senior Chief Navy Diver David C. Jones and Chief Navy Diver Gary G. Ladd Jr. were charged with dereliction of duty in the deaths of Diver 1st Class James Reyher, 29, and Diver 2nd Class Ryan Harris, 22. The divers and the defendants were members of the elite Mobile Salvage and Diving Unit 2, based in Virginia Beach, Va. The charges were the first to be brought in the deaths of Reyher and Harris.
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NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | August 16, 1993
Washington. -- To some, the problem of vacant space in our older factory cities and suburbs is environmental ''red-lining.'' Builders, lenders, corporations and insurers systematically reject urban sites where even the slightest hint of industrial contamination exists.Others call it the ''brown-fields'' problem -- that instead of recycling sites where the Industrial Revolution in America was born, places where much of our national wealth was generated and much of our history written, developers keep heading out for exurban ''green-fields.
NEWS
August 22, 2013
Baltimore's leaders are to be commended for their efforts to steadily reduce crime, improve student test scores and graduation rates, and lower property taxes. Such steps are absolutely critical to meeting Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's goal of reversing Baltimore's decades-long decline and drawing 10,000 new families to the city over a 10-year period. Yet even if all those worthy goals are achieved, no outsider - or resident - will think of Baltimore as a truly great metropolis (let alone the "Greatest City on Earth," as those bus benches proclaim)
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | August 27, 2000
Many people know Annapolis as the historic district: the busy shops and restaurants of Main Street and the City Dock, the beautifully restored historic homes and churches, the State House building and the state offices. Yet, as this section of Maryland's capital has thrived, the resurrection of a nearby commercial strip on West Street has remained elusive, with a revitalization plan that has stagnated on paper for 15 years. But after final approval this month of Park Place - a $150 million dollar mixed-use development with a theater and hotel on 7 acres that many consider the linch-pin site - and with other projects in the works, the long-awaited West Street renaissance seems at hand.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 18, 1997
WASHINGTON -- A two-year-long, highly classified internal Justice Department inquiry has concluded that the FBI was derelict in failing to aggressively pursue the case that ultimately led to Aldrich H. Ames, the most damaging spy in the history of the CIA.A report on the Justice Department's inquiry, officials said, blamed the FBI for reacting slowly after two Soviet officials working in Washington, who had been recruited as spies by the FBI, were inexplicably...
NEWS
By Dan Berger | February 5, 1996
We used up this year's snow supply in the first blizzard and are already digging into the 1997-98 quota.Housing inspectors invest in derelict slum properties because it's what they know.If only Congress could reshape the budget as definitively as it did the communications industry.Maybe it would help if NFL moguls gave up the idea of home cities and just played out of mobile caravans.
BUSINESS
November 19, 2009
Chesapeake Shipbuilding said Wednesday that it has signed a contract to acquire about three acres of property adjacent to the shipyard. The acquisition would allow the company to expand and create as many as 125 new jobs. The land, located on the Wicomico River, is now an empty lot with a "derelict" bulkhead, the company said in a press release. The company designs and builds commercial steel vessels and has been in Salisbury for more than 30 years. - Andrea K. Walker
NEWS
June 27, 1998
AFTER YEARS of ignoring the growing problem of abandoned houses, the city is razing derelict buildings at a record rate. "For the next couple of years, you will see an awful lot of demolition," pledges Housing Commissioner Daniel P. Henson III, who intends to increase the number from 1,750 buildings to 2,500 a year.As cranes and bulldozers wipe out derelict blocks, it is becoming clear that Mr. Henson, using bureaucratic powers that are not subject to anyone's review, is conducting planning by demolition.
NEWS
December 8, 1999
Abandoned houses had to be razed before causing further decayIn a recent editorial assessing the administration of Kurt L. Schmoke and commenting on my performance as housing commissioner, The Sun clearly contradicts itself ("His grade is C+ after 12 years," Nov. 22)."Thousands of derelict rowhouses were razed," it wrote, "but because he [Mr. Henson] operated without an overall plan, his middle-of-the-block demolitions devastated many neighborhoods."I do not understand what The Sun would have preferred: That we leave the "derelict" property in place, guaranteeing that the houses on either side would deteriorate along with it and further "devastate" the community?
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2013
For years, environmentalists and watermen have been searching for a way to deal with the Chesapeake Bay's "ghost pots" - derelict crab traps that are too deep to retrieve and too problematic to co-exist with marine life. Though the traps have been abandoned, they continue to ensnare and kill crabs. Now two Anne Arundel County high school seniors have developed a possible solution: a trap held together with zinc rings that decay, making abandoned traps fall apart at the bottom of the bay. "Leave it kids to find a great solution for a serious problem," said Tony Friedrich, executive director of the Coastal Conservation Association of Maryland.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2010
Penn Station, the city's bustling train, bus and taxi hub, sits almost exactly in Baltimore's geographic center. Within a two-mile radius lie many of the city's cultural treasures: four colleges and universities, two major art museums, a symphony and an opera hall and the stately main branch of the library. Youthful entrepreneurs have transformed once-derelict blocks just north of the station with nightclubs, galleries, a movie theater and even a do-it-yourself electronics workshop.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler | March 6, 2010
On a day when he could have been out oystering, waterman Mike Edwards trolled the Chesapeake Bay south of Annapolis on Friday for a different quarry. Sitting at the wheel of his workboat, the Miss Renee Two, he felt a "nudge" on the line he was towing astern and winched it in to discover he'd hooked a mucky but otherwise intact crab pot. A lone oyster toadfish lay trapped inside. "I got one this time," said Edwards - meaning the pot, rather than the fish. Edwards, 53, of Grasonville is part of a small navy of watermen who have been hired by the state Department of Natural Resources this winter to pull derelict crab pots from the water.
BUSINESS
November 19, 2009
Chesapeake Shipbuilding said Wednesday that it has signed a contract to acquire about three acres of property adjacent to the shipyard. The acquisition would allow the company to expand and create as many as 125 new jobs. The land, located on the Wicomico River, is now an empty lot with a "derelict" bulkhead, the company said in a press release. The company designs and builds commercial steel vessels and has been in Salisbury for more than 30 years. - Andrea K. Walker
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,michael.dresser@baltsun.com | June 3, 2009
A decrepit railroad bridge in the shadow of Interstate 95 could find new life as the linchpin of a 5 1/2 -mile trail encircling the Middle Branch of the Patapsco River - opening up recreational opportunities along a stretch of Baltimore waterfront that some are calling "the next Inner Harbor." For now, the century-old CSX swing bridge carries little traffic except the occasional trespasser with a crab pot. But city officials and a prominent developer envision a restored span that would serve runners, bicyclists and folks who simply want to take a stroll along a stretch of shoreline that is being reclaimed from industrial development.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 13, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Retired Army Lt. Gen. Ricardo Sanchez, the former top military commander in Iraq, delivered a blistering critique of U.S. involvement in the Iraq conflict yesterday, calling American political leaders "incompetent." Addressing an audience of journalists who cover the military, Sanchez said the armed force's mission to invade Iraq and overthrow Saddam Hussein was flawed from the start. National leaders, said Sanchez, "have unquestionably been derelict in the performance of their duty."
NEWS
January 21, 2006
William "Bud" Post III, 66, who won a $16.2 million jackpot and bitterly called it the "lottery of death" after his life turned sour, died of respiratory failure Sunday at a hospital in Seneca, Pa. He won the Pennsylvania lottery in 1988 after pawning a ring for $40 and buying 40 tickets. Until then, he had worked odd jobs, had been married five times and was living on Social Security disability income. But the winnings, which were paid out in annual installments of $498,000 after taxes, brought trouble.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2013
For years, environmentalists and watermen have been searching for a way to deal with the Chesapeake Bay's "ghost pots" - derelict crab traps that are too deep to retrieve and too problematic to co-exist with marine life. Though the traps have been abandoned, they continue to ensnare and kill crabs. Now two Anne Arundel County high school seniors have developed a possible solution: a trap held together with zinc rings that decay, making abandoned traps fall apart at the bottom of the bay. "Leave it kids to find a great solution for a serious problem," said Tony Friedrich, executive director of the Coastal Conservation Association of Maryland.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN REPORTER | October 5, 2007
It certainly wasn't the Ride the Ducks tour. Instead of the Inner Harbor or Camden Yards or any of Charm City's usual sights, a caravan of buses bearing more than 200 developers, real estate brokers, architects and planners rode past derelict and hard-at-work factories, boarded-up houses and huge swaths of vacant land. They surveyed parking lots with potential. They saw gleaming new offices and medical centers and apartments in buildings converted from something else. Most of all, they were on the lookout for opportunities.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun reporter | September 16, 2007
As a veteran diver and recreational fisherman, Skip Zinck is used to dodging junk that dots the surface of the Chesapeake Bay and the mouths of its rivers. But there's one kind of debris lurking below the surface that really spooks him: ghost pots. Tens of thousands of derelict crab pots - enough to fill every bleacher seat at Camden Yards for 23 games - litter the shallows of the main stem of the bay. The traps, usually set adrift by storms, are potential deathtraps for fish, terrapins and crabs - and a threat to the bay's fragile ecology.
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