Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDerek Walcott
IN THE NEWS

Derek Walcott

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | March 22, 1993
Uneasy lies the crown when you're a Nobel laureate. Derek Walcott can attest to that.Mr. Walcott, the Caribbean-born poet/playwright/painter, was in Baltimore last Friday to attend a showing of one of his plays, "Pantomime," at Villa Julie College, and also to give two talks to students there.But although he was by all accounts a smash hit with students and faculty alike, showing a genuine humility and disarming sense of humor, the winner of the most recent Nobel Prize in literature acknowledged the honor can bring out strange responses from others.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 28, 2005
In her fourth year leading the Naval Academy's Masqueraders theater troupe, Christy Stanlake again is offering extraordinary theatrical fare with Hannah Cowley's 18th-century romantic comedy, The Belle's Stratagem, opening tonight in the academy's Mahan Hall. Stanlake, 33, has established a reputation for her exceptional theatrical choices of works not often done. In her first year with the Masqueraders, Stanlake brought George Bernard Shaw's St. Joan to the overwhelmingly male academy because, she said, she wanted "to get students thinking of theater as reflective of their lives, with a military leader connected to her troops leading in battle but serving her people."
Advertisement
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 28, 2005
In her fourth year leading the Naval Academy's Masqueraders theater troupe, Christy Stanlake again is offering extraordinary theatrical fare with Hannah Cowley's 18th-century romantic comedy, The Belle's Stratagem, opening tonight in the academy's Mahan Hall. Stanlake, 33, has established a reputation for her exceptional theatrical choices of works not often done. In her first year with the Masqueraders, Stanlake brought George Bernard Shaw's St. Joan to the overwhelmingly male academy because, she said, she wanted "to get students thinking of theater as reflective of their lives, with a military leader connected to her troops leading in battle but serving her people."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jean Thompson and By Jean Thompson,Sun Staff | April 2, 2000
"Tiepolo's Hound," by Derek Walcott. Farrar Straus & Giroux. 163 pages. $30. Since light was simply particles in air, and shadow shared the spectrum, strokes of paint are phrases that haphazardly cohere around a point to build an argument It is no secret that Derek Walcott paints with words. The Nobel laureate who prefers to write in couplets has been called a contemporary Homer. His latest poem reveals yet another talent: He knows his way around a palette. Doubly blessed is doubly cursed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jean Thompson and By Jean Thompson,Sun Staff | April 2, 2000
"Tiepolo's Hound," by Derek Walcott. Farrar Straus & Giroux. 163 pages. $30. Since light was simply particles in air, and shadow shared the spectrum, strokes of paint are phrases that haphazardly cohere around a point to build an argument It is no secret that Derek Walcott paints with words. The Nobel laureate who prefers to write in couplets has been called a contemporary Homer. His latest poem reveals yet another talent: He knows his way around a palette. Doubly blessed is doubly cursed.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Daily News | October 20, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- Two weeks ago, Rush Limbaugh and Jimmy Buffett -- pop culture icons, both -- topped the New York Times hardcover best-seller lists. Two weeks ago, Derek Walcott won the Nobel Prize for literature. A famous face or high media profile can obviously be used to jump-start book sales. But does literary acclaim also result in dollars at the bookstore? "It certainly has some impact," said Helene Atwan, associate publisher for Farrar, Straus & Giroux. Ms. Atwan has firsthand experience with the question: FSG publishes both Mr. Walcott and last year's Nobel laureate, Nadine Gordimer.
FEATURES
By Thomas Swick and Thomas Swick,Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | May 10, 1992
Since cruise ships don't have the equivalent of an in-flight magazine, here's a suggestion for forward-thinking captains: Put copy of Bim in every cabin.It makes perfect sense. Most ships visit the Caribbean, and Bim is the literary journal of the Caribbean. It provides infinitely more stimulating reading than Danielle Steel. And this year it is celebrating its golden anniversary.Barely. The journal that began in Barbados in 1942 is hurting financially and today often opens with an apology for the time that has elapsed between issues.
NEWS
November 1, 1996
Thursday's Live section listed the wrong number to call for information on a reading Nov. 6 by Nobel-Prize winning writer Derek Walcott at the University of Maryland Baltimore County's University Center Ballroom, 5401 Wilkens Ave. in Catonsville. The correct number to call for information on the 7: 30 p.m. reading is (410) 455-6798.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 11/01/96
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | March 6, 1998
"The Capeman," Paul Simon's Broadway musical, will close March 28. The $11 million musical, which marked Simon's Broadway debut, had been greeted by scorching reviews.The musical had net receipts of $404,690, out of a potential of $784,593, for the week ending last Sunday, according to Variety. It will have played 68 regular performances and 59 previews when it closes.The high number of previews was symptomatic of the show's troubles, which included a postponed opening and a total of four directors.
NEWS
October 9, 1995
In awarding the 1995 Nobel Prize for Literature to Seamus Heaney, the Swedish Academy acknowledged the importance of Ireland to English letters, but struck a blow for poetry.It is a small island of some 5 million souls, but this is Ireland's third Nobel Prize for Literature after the poet-playwright William Butler Yeats (1923) and the playwright Samuel Beckett (1969), the fourth if the playwright-essayist George Bernard Shaw (1925) is credited to the country of his birth. Ireland's contribution of talent that glorified the English more than the Irish language for centuries is immense.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | March 22, 1993
Uneasy lies the crown when you're a Nobel laureate. Derek Walcott can attest to that.Mr. Walcott, the Caribbean-born poet/playwright/painter, was in Baltimore last Friday to attend a showing of one of his plays, "Pantomime," at Villa Julie College, and also to give two talks to students there.But although he was by all accounts a smash hit with students and faculty alike, showing a genuine humility and disarming sense of humor, the winner of the most recent Nobel Prize in literature acknowledged the honor can bring out strange responses from others.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Daily News | October 20, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- Two weeks ago, Rush Limbaugh and Jimmy Buffett -- pop culture icons, both -- topped the New York Times hardcover best-seller lists. Two weeks ago, Derek Walcott won the Nobel Prize for literature. A famous face or high media profile can obviously be used to jump-start book sales. But does literary acclaim also result in dollars at the bookstore? "It certainly has some impact," said Helene Atwan, associate publisher for Farrar, Straus & Giroux. Ms. Atwan has firsthand experience with the question: FSG publishes both Mr. Walcott and last year's Nobel laureate, Nadine Gordimer.
FEATURES
By Thomas Swick and Thomas Swick,Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | May 10, 1992
Since cruise ships don't have the equivalent of an in-flight magazine, here's a suggestion for forward-thinking captains: Put copy of Bim in every cabin.It makes perfect sense. Most ships visit the Caribbean, and Bim is the literary journal of the Caribbean. It provides infinitely more stimulating reading than Danielle Steel. And this year it is celebrating its golden anniversary.Barely. The journal that began in Barbados in 1942 is hurting financially and today often opens with an apology for the time that has elapsed between issues.
NEWS
October 24, 1992
"Yet do I marvel at this curious thing," the American poet Countee Cullen wrote in the 1920s, "to make a poet black and bid him sing!" For West Indian poet Derek Walcott, there was cause to rejoice this month when the Swedish academy awarded him the Nobel Prize for Literature.Mr. Walcott, who teaches writing and literature at Boston University, has been compared to the Greek poets of antiquity for his luminous language and majestic narratives. His poems both celebrate the rich cultural diversity of his native West Indies and evoke the darkness of colonialism, slavery and exile.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman | October 10, 1994
Writers who desire great honors -- the Nobel, poet laureate for the United States, or the world's richest poetry prize -- may want to try this incantation: HoCoPoLitSo, HoCoPoLitSo, HoCoPoLitSo.That's the accepted shorthand for the Columbia-based Howard County Poetry and Literature Society, which seems to have an uncanny knack for bringing good fortune to its speakers.The society, which celebrates its 20th anniversary next month, snared W. S. Merwin for this weekend's residency. Last month, he was awarded the first-ever Tanning Prize, a $100,000 bequest.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.