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By Christian Berthelsen and Ned Parker and Christian Berthelsen and Ned Parker,Los Angeles Times | March 24, 2007
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Bombings wounded one of Iraq's two deputy prime ministers in his prayer room yesterday and killed nine people, the latest attack on Sunni Arabs perceived as collaborators because of their involvement with the U.S.-backed government. Salam al-Zubaie, a member of the largest Sunni bloc in parliament, was injured when a suicide bomber detonated an explosive belt in a small mosque at the politician's home during noon prayers. A car bomb went off outside at the same time. The attack wounded 14 other people.
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FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | May 22, 2007
Britain's deputy prime minister told a Baltimore audience yesterday that his country regretted its part in the African slave trade. He called on other nations to redouble efforts to combat modern forms of slavery. Deputy Prime Minister John Leslie Prescott made his remarks at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture, where a major exhibition about slavery in Maryland is on view. "We recognize the active role Britain played in the slave trade," Prescott said, noting that millions of African slaves were forcibly transported to British colonies in North America and the Caribbean during the 17th, 18th and early 19th centuries.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 14, 1999
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- The most liberal member of the Yugoslav government has sharply attacked the use of Serbian wartime patriotism for ideological and political ends, throwing down an indirect challenge to President Slobodan Milosevic and his nationalist and leftist allies, including Milosevic's wife.In two extraordinary statements over the last two days, Yugoslavia's Deputy Prime Minister Vuk Draskovic has become the only official to condemn both the murder Sunday of an opposition publisher, Slavko Curuvija, and proposals for Yugoslavia to form an alliance with Russia and Belarus.
NEWS
By Christian Berthelsen and Ned Parker and Christian Berthelsen and Ned Parker,Los Angeles Times | March 24, 2007
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Bombings wounded one of Iraq's two deputy prime ministers in his prayer room yesterday and killed nine people, the latest attack on Sunni Arabs perceived as collaborators because of their involvement with the U.S.-backed government. Salam al-Zubaie, a member of the largest Sunni bloc in parliament, was injured when a suicide bomber detonated an explosive belt in a small mosque at the politician's home during noon prayers. A car bomb went off outside at the same time. The attack wounded 14 other people.
NEWS
By BORZOU DARAGAHI AND LOUISE ROUG and BORZOU DARAGAHI AND LOUISE ROUG,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 14, 2005
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Two detainees may have been tortured to death at the hands of Iraqi security forces, the head of a commission investigating allegations of abuse at Iraqi jails said yesterday. But the precise cause of their deaths is unclear, Iraqi Deputy Prime Minister Rosh Shawais, who is heading the investigation, said in an interview. Detainees told investigators that the two detainees were tortured or starved to death, while prison officials say the pair died of natural causes. U.S. Ambassador Zalmay Khalilzad told reporters yesterday that at least 120 prisoners have allegedly been abused at the hands of Iraqi security forces, more than previously disclosed by the government of Iraqi Prime Minister Ibrahim al-Jaafari.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 16, 1998
MOSCOW -- An outspoken economic reformer reportedly has left the Russian government, removing one of the last strong voices for free-market reform in the team being put together by Prime Minister Yevgeny Primakov.The future of the official, Boris Fyodorov, a former finance minister who returned to the government in the spring to spearhead an aggressive tax collection drive, has been closely watched here and abroad as a sign of whether the Primakov government will represent a range of economic viewpoints or will tilt heavily toward policies favored by the Communists.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | May 22, 2007
Britain's deputy prime minister told a Baltimore audience yesterday that his country regretted its part in the African slave trade. He called on other nations to redouble efforts to combat modern forms of slavery. Deputy Prime Minister John Leslie Prescott made his remarks at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture, where a major exhibition about slavery in Maryland is on view. "We recognize the active role Britain played in the slave trade," Prescott said, noting that millions of African slaves were forcibly transported to British colonies in North America and the Caribbean during the 17th, 18th and early 19th centuries.
NEWS
August 14, 1995
F. Romuald Spasowski, 74, once an ardent Polish Communist and Poland's ambassador in Washington who then defected dramatically at the height of the Solidarity crisis in 1981, died of cancer Wednesday at his home in Oakton, Va. He was a diplomat for 37 years, and also had been Poland's ambassador to India and a deputy foreign minister.Gijs van Aardenne, 65, who served as Holland's economic affairs minister from 1977 to 1981 and from 1982 until 1986, also serving as deputy prime minister during his second term, died of a degenerative muscle disease Thursday in Dordrecht, Netherlands.
NEWS
July 5, 1996
IT IS REASSURING that one of Necmettin Erbakan's first actions as prime minister of Turkey was to promise continuing good relations with the U.S. to a high-ranking American delegation that happened by. The doughty crusader for a more Islamic Turkey had, by the turn of the political wheel, put the relationship in question. But having been a deputy prime minister before, his record is for pragmatism in action contrasting with flaming rhetoric on the stump.Mr. Erbakan's Welfare Party came in first in the December elections, thanks to divisions in the center-left and center-right.
BUSINESS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau | April 24, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Western financial leaders warned Russia yesterday that any retreat from radical economic reform could throw possible financial aid into jeopardy.At the same time, Germany and Japan were urged to adopt growth packages to help underpin a world economic recovery and help the West ease the former Soviet republics and Eastern Europe into the capitalist world.The two initiatives set the major agendas for a series of international financial meetings here this weekend.They also preceded the arrival here of Yegor Gaidar, the Russian deputy prime minister and economic "czar," who will address both the policy-making interim committee of the International Monetary Fund and the finance ministers of the Group of Seven, the seven most powerful industrial democracies in the world.
NEWS
By KIM MURPHY and KIM MURPHY,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 18, 2006
LONDON -- Amid plummeting public support in Britain for backing America's policy in the war on terrorism, Deputy Prime Minister John Prescott denied yesterday that he called President Bush a "cowboy with his Stetson hat" whose progress on a Middle East peace plan was "crap." The tempest over Prescott's purported remarks in a private meeting with fellow Labor Party lawmakers underscored growing misgivings within the government of Prime Minister Tony Blair, who until now has been Bush's strongest ally on Iraq, Afghanistan and, more recently, Lebanon.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 25, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Nobody in Saddam Hussein's inner circle was more tirelessly reverential toward Iraq's former ruler while he was in power than Tariq Aziz, the one-time deputy prime minister, so much so that one former aide to Aziz claimed after Hussein's overthrow that he used to salute the telephone when calls from Hussein came in. So there was little surprise yesterday when Aziz became the first senior member of the old ruling elite to testify for...
NEWS
By JOHN MURPHY and JOHN MURPHY,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | January 6, 2006
JERUSALEM -- Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon remained in an induced coma early today and battling for his life, hospital officials said, after more than eight hours of surgery to stop severe bleeding in his brain from the stroke he suffered Wednesday night. Israelis offered prayers for the recovery of Sharon, 77, but there was growing awareness that his larger-than-life career as one of the country's foremost military and political leaders was drawing to a close. Doctors at Hadassah-Ein Kerem Hospital, where Sharon underwent the surgery, said he was in serious but stable condition and would remain in the drug-induced coma for up 72 hours to "recover from severe trauma."
NEWS
By BORZOU DARAGAHI AND LOUISE ROUG and BORZOU DARAGAHI AND LOUISE ROUG,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 14, 2005
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Two detainees may have been tortured to death at the hands of Iraqi security forces, the head of a commission investigating allegations of abuse at Iraqi jails said yesterday. But the precise cause of their deaths is unclear, Iraqi Deputy Prime Minister Rosh Shawais, who is heading the investigation, said in an interview. Detainees told investigators that the two detainees were tortured or starved to death, while prison officials say the pair died of natural causes. U.S. Ambassador Zalmay Khalilzad told reporters yesterday that at least 120 prisoners have allegedly been abused at the hands of Iraqi security forces, more than previously disclosed by the government of Iraqi Prime Minister Ibrahim al-Jaafari.
NEWS
By Liz Sly and Liz Sly,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 9, 2005
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- An explosion of insurgent violence in Iraq killed seven U.S. service members over the weekend even as Iraq's National Assembly approved six more ministers to the new Iraqi government. But one of the ministers, Hashim al Shibli, immediately rejected the job, saying he had not been asked whether he wanted it. He said he first learned he was appointed Iraq's human rights minister when he turned on the TV news yesterday morning, shortly after a majority of the delegates attending the National Assembly session approved his candidacy.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | August 30, 2003
LONDON - Prime Minister Tony Blair's influential communications director announced yesterday that he will step down as his boss grapples with the toughest political challenge of his rule amid allegations that the government hyped intelligence on Iraqi weapons to justify war. The resignation of Alastair Campbell, 46, leaves Blair without the services of his closest and most trusted aide. The two have worked together since 1994, three years before Blair became prime minister. Campbell's resignation comes as a judicial inquiry is examining the possibility that government pressure may have contributed to the apparent suicide of David Kelly, a government scientist and weapons expert.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | August 30, 2003
LONDON - Prime Minister Tony Blair's influential communications director announced yesterday that he will step down as his boss grapples with the toughest political challenge of his rule amid allegations that the government hyped intelligence on Iraqi weapons to justify war. The resignation of Alastair Campbell, 46, leaves Blair without the services of his closest and most trusted aide. The two have worked together since 1994, three years before Blair became prime minister. Campbell's resignation comes as a judicial inquiry is examining the possibility that government pressure may have contributed to the apparent suicide of David Kelly, a government scientist and weapons expert.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 30, 1996
The man at the center of Turkey's political earthquake is considerably less militant than he was 20 years ago, but he has not abandoned his Islamic and anti-Western beliefs.Necmettin Erbakan, the Islamic party leader who on Friday put together a coalition that made him prime minister of a resolutely secular country, has a grandfatherly manner and a broad, reassuring smile.During the campaign leading up to a parliamentary election in December, in which his party won slightly more than 21 percent of the vote, he often plunged into crowds after speaking and spent hours shaking hands, kissing babies and listening to personal complaints.
NEWS
July 23, 2003
The 55 most wanted Iraqis and their status, according to U.S. Central Command: No. 1: Saddam Hussein, president. No. 2: Qusai Saddam Hussein, Hussein's son. Killed July 22. No. 3: Odai Saddam Hussein, Hussein's son. Killed July 22. No. 4: Abid Hamid Mahmud al-Tikriti, presidential secretary, Hussein's cousin. Taken into custody June 17. No. 5: Ali Hassan al-Majid, presidential adviser, Revolutionary Command Council member. Also known as "Chemical Ali." Possibly killed. No. 6: Izzat Ibrahim al-Douri, RCC vice chairman, longtime Hussein confidant.
NEWS
By William Safire | September 3, 2002
WASHINGTON - Let me see if I can write this column without getting sued. It has to do with my old pal Lee Kuan Yew, who prefers to be called "senior minister" rather than dictator of Singapore, and whose family members have been doing exceedingly well lately. In kowtowing to the Lee family, the Bloomberg News Service- the feisty, aggressive newcomer to coverage of global finance on cable and computers - has just demeaned itself and undermined the cause of a free online press. Early last month, Patrick Smith, a Bloomberg columnist, dared to take note of the elevation of Ho Ching, the senior minister's daughter-in-law, to head Temesek, the powerful state-owned investment company.
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