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By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff writer | August 25, 1991
When Donald W. Hindenlang was hired as a patrol deputy at the countySheriff's Office in January, he thought his would be a job of tracking down burglars, robbers and rapists.But the 23-year-old deputy last week found himself trying to identify the guilty party in a routine traffic accident.Hindenlang is one of 77 deputies who have been trained to take over accident investigations on county roads from the state police under an agreement signed by Harford and state administrators two weeks ago. The state police will continue to investigate accidents on state roads and Interstate 95.Deputies like Hindenlang should get plenty of experience at the task.
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NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff writer | March 1, 1992
Thirteen non-union deputies of the Harford Sheriff's Office have sued the state, seeking back pay they say is owed to them for coming into work 15 minutes early every day for roll calls.The deputies sayin the suit, filed Monday in Harford Circuit Court, that the state has violated Maryland's wage laws, which requires employers to providewages for hours worked."The deputies conferred a benefit to the state by working and providing services to the state, and have not been compensated for theirefforts," the suit says.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 12, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- A mentally disturbed man who was killed last month by Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies was shot nine times in the back, with several of the bullets apparently striking his body as he lay "against the pavement or concrete in a face-down position," according to a copy of the sealed autopsy report obtained yesterday by the Los Angeles Times.The county coroner's report also shows that 33-year-old Keith Hamilton suffered head, mouth, elbow, and knee injuries, indicating deputies struck Mr. Hamilton with batons, his family's attorney says.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Richard Irwin,SUN STAFF | August 30, 2002
Two Prince George's County sheriff's deputies were shot to death last night while attempting to serve psychiatric commitment papers and take into custody one of two men in a house in Adelphi, authorities said. The names of the deputies - a man and a woman - were not immediately divulged. State police said the deputies were hit by a shotgun blast. The man was pronounced dead inside the house in the 9300 block of Lynmont Drive, near Route 212. The woman was rushed by ambulance to Prince George's Hospital Center in Cheverly, where she died a short time later, authorities said.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff Writer | August 29, 1992
John M. Staubitz Jr., the former state health official convicted of skimming thousands of dollars in the State Games scandal and who was on the lam for nearly a month before his arrest last week in Las Vegas, said last night that he had fled to avoid sentencing because he was "confused" and "scared.""It was a foolhardy thing to do," Staubitz said as Baltimore sheriff's deputies escorted him through Baltimore-Washington International Airport. "I guess I was just confused and a little scared.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Bruce Reid contributed to this article | January 15, 1995
The Harford County sheriff's sniper who shot a man during a standoff in Norrisville Tuesday was given several days off to cope with the emotional strain of the job, a sheriff's spokesman said."
NEWS
By JUSTIN FENTON and JUSTIN FENTON,SUN REPORTER | July 9, 2006
Turmoil continued to shake the Harford County Sheriff's Office last week as a captain suspected of making allegations of electioneering against the sheriff's second-in-command was demoted and a deputy who made public claims of morale problems within the agency was suspended, each for alleged work-related infractions. The developments come on the heels of Sheriff R. Thomas Golding's recent announcement that state prosecutors decided not to bring criminal charges against his undersheriff, Col. Howard Walter.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | September 27, 2002
Several of Baltimore's Hispanic leaders demanded an apology yesterday from the city Sheriff's Department for the alleged beating of a member of their community who was mistaken for a bank robber and shot with stun guns. Rolando Sanchez, a Salvadoran construction worker who speaks little English, claims he was taking a lunch break at Lexington Market on Sept. 18 when at least 10 deputies attacked and humiliated him, then left him injured without calling an ambulance. "This did not just happen to Rolando, it happened to the community," Hispanic activist Angelo Solera said at a rally in the rain in front of Courthouse East.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Evening Sun Staff | November 6, 1990
Two Howard County sheriff's deputies are contending that fellow deputies brought charges of neo-Nazi behavior against them to drum them out of the department.During an administrative trial board yesterday, Maj. Donald Pruitt also charged that disgruntled deputies sent him books and literature on Nazi Germany and photographed them in his office to make it appear he was a Nazi."I was getting these books and getting these papers. Then, all of a sudden, I'm in the newspapers," he said under direct examination by his attorney, Michael Marshall.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | May 18, 2000
Anne Arundel County deputy sheriffs are expected to vote tonight on the county's latest contract offer, the third in six weeks. The vote will come less than a day before a fact-finder is to issue contract recommendations. The newest offer is not much different from the last three-year pact that deputies rejected. That one would have crunched the pay scale so that workers would reach the top in 10 years instead of 22, offered an average 7 percent pay hike stretched over three years and phased in a gun and clothing allowance of about $650.
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