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Editorial from The Aegis | May 16, 2013
Harford County has had many big-time sports moments in its glorious history. Perhaps none were bigger, however, than the one that happened 30 years ago this week. That's when Harford County's own Deputed Testamony won the 1983 Preakness, bringing home the second of the three jewels of the Triple Crown of thoroughbred horse racing contested each year. The Triple Crown, for horse racing novices, is the Kentucky Derby on the first Saturday in May, the Preakness down the road at Pimlico in Baltimore on the third Saturday in May and the Belmont Park in Elmont, N.Y., on Long Island three Saturdays later.
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Editorial from The Aegis | May 16, 2013
Harford County has had many big-time sports moments in its glorious history. Perhaps none were bigger, however, than the one that happened 30 years ago this week. That's when Harford County's own Deputed Testamony won the 1983 Preakness, bringing home the second of the three jewels of the Triple Crown of thoroughbred horse racing contested each year. The Triple Crown, for horse racing novices, is the Kentucky Derby on the first Saturday in May, the Preakness down the road at Pimlico in Baltimore on the third Saturday in May and the Belmont Park in Elmont, N.Y., on Long Island three Saturdays later.
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SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | June 6, 1994
Jockey Edgar Prado slipped through along the rail and got up in the final strides with Sondra and Howard Bender's 3-year-old colt, Dixie Power, yesterday and defeated Cloud's Forty Four by a half-length in the $75,000 Deputed Testamony Stakes at Pimlico Race Course."
SPORTS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2013
Nicole Stall boarded the first plane to Maryland she could catch when she heard of Benjamin Boniface's death last June. She was there to grieve the death of a boy she had known since his birth. But also to work. In the days after the 20-year-old's death in an early-morning car accident on the farm, she went to the barns where she had fallen in love with horses as a teenager. “I was completely out of it,” said William K. Boniface, known to most as Billy. “She just went out to the stallion barn, kept it running.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | June 9, 1996
There were four Triple Crown nominees in the original field for the $75,000 Deputed Testamony Stakes, but none of them reached the wire first at Pimlico yesterday.That distinction belonged to Foolish Pole, ridden deftly by Herb McCauley to a 6 1/2 -length romp over 1 1/8 miles."My horse was full of run and placed himself perfectly," said McCauley, who came in from New Jersey to ride two winners and a runner-up in his three mounts. "We got the ideal trip."With the pace snail-like (25 seconds for the quarter and 48 3/5 for a half-mile)
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | February 21, 1999
Good Fellas Stables purchased Smart Guy as a yearling at the Timonium sales for $10,000. Obviously, he was a bargain.The Smarten colt returned the purchase price more than four-fold yesterday with a resounding victory in the $75,000 Deputed Testamony Stakes at 8-to-1 odds.A full brother to the accomplished Maragold Princess, Smart Guy "is not a very big horse," according to trainer Tim Ritchey. "But I liked the way he looked in the ring and the way he moved."With jockey David Appleby in the irons, Smart Guy stalked an honest pace for six furlongs, then exploded to the front and went on to win by 9 1/4 lengths over another long shot, Scootch.
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By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | June 8, 1998
Among the horses who have beaten Raghib are Coronado's Quest and Lil's Lad.So, it was no surprise that the New York invader was established as the favorite in yesterday's $75,000 Deputed Testamony Stakes at Pimlico Race Course.And the son of Phone Trick upheld his billing with a hard-earned length victory over P Day, who nosed out Farwell Look for the place.Raghib is trained by Kiaran McLaughlin, but assistant Bob Witham was here for the Maryland-bred stakes over 1 1/8 miles."He's growing up and getting better," said Witham of the winner, who covered the distance in 1 minute, 50 3/5 seconds over a fast track.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2012
The Boniface family of Bonita Farm in Darlington has been through a lot this year. Benjamin Boniface, 20, died when he lost control of his pickup truck on the private farm lane early one morning in June after "he failed to negotiate a curve," according to the Harford County Sheriff's Office. And Deputed Testamony, their home-bred who was the oldest living Triple Crown race winner and the last Maryland-bred horse to win the Preakness, passed away at age 32 in September. But the Boniface family, like their horses, is made of hardy stock.
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By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | October 20, 2000
On a slate-gray October day, with winter's gloom so near at hand, Horatius nibbles on clover from the palm of Cynthia McGinnes. On the opposite side of the Chesapeake Bay, Deputed Testamony accepts a pat on the shoulder from Bill Boniface. The tranquil scenes at far-flung horse farms defy the explosiveness of these two horses on the racetrack and their impact on Maryland racing in the breeding shed. The two stallions, distinguished senior citizens of the highest rank, stand apart from the state's more expensive, more fashionable sires.
FEATURES
May 3, 1992
Some of the critics scoffed. If Billy Boniface wasn't careful, Deputed Testamony might be delayed in traffic -- and not on the turn for home at Pimlico. Boniface's intention was to avoid much of the pre-Preakness commotion in 1983. So, in a grand plan, he would keep the colt at Bonita Farm (then in Creswell, Md.) and take it on a leisurely trip to Pimlico Race Course the morning of the race.It was a tactic favored by trainers in England. Boniface, while in the Marines, accumulated leave and used the time to visit New Market, where he observed the British method for conditioning and handling racing stock.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2012
The Boniface family of Bonita Farm in Darlington has been through a lot this year. Benjamin Boniface, 20, died when he lost control of his pickup truck on the private farm lane early one morning in June after "he failed to negotiate a curve," according to the Harford County Sheriff's Office. And Deputed Testamony, their home-bred who was the oldest living Triple Crown race winner and the last Maryland-bred horse to win the Preakness, passed away at age 32 in September. But the Boniface family, like their horses, is made of hardy stock.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2012
After six months off to recover from the wear and tear of a North American record 22 straight victories, Rapid Redux will be retired next week to Kentucky Horse Park, his owner Robert Cole and trainer David Wells said. "He's perfect right now and we want him to stay that way," said Cole, a Towson native. "Why risk having him get beat. " Located outside of Lexington, Kentucky Horse Park is home to many famous horses, including Cigar, Da Horse and Funny Cide. John Henry, who was a resident, is buried there.
SPORTS
By Sun Staff reports | May 21, 2011
Katherine Sancuk's No Brakes rallied from next to last to win $25,000 Deputed Testamony Starter Handicap, the first of nine stakes on Preakness Day. Xavier Perez rode the 6-year-old gelding, who finished fifth in the race last year and was claimed for $5,000 by his present connections in March, pulled ahead near the 16th marker and narrowly beat Money For Love to the finish. "I claimed this horse specifically for this race," said Sancuk, the owner and trainer. "He runs hard every time.
NEWS
By Ron Fritz, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2011
Bill Boniface of Bonita Farms in Darlington won the 1983 Preakness with Deputed Testamony. He remembers the buzz his horse created during the week leading into the race and after the victory. He can't wait for the 2011 Preakness in two weeks now that trainer Graham Motion's Animal Kingdom, a horse based in Fair Hill, Md., won the Kentucky Derby Saturday. "I think it will be a plus for Maryland, and, as you well know, we need some good news," Boniface said Saturday. "It's going to add excitement for the local trainers.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | May 18, 2008
Edgar Prado was supposed to be the one riding overwhelming favorite Big Brown in his quest for the Triple Crown yesterday. That's what he wanted, and that's what trainer Rick Dutrow wanted. Instead, Prado climbed aboard Riley Tucker to try for an upset of the Kentucky Derby winner. Asked if the experience would be bittersweet, he said, "Definitely." An injury cost Prado his chance to ride Big Brown in the horse's debut in September. But Dutrow had his favorite jockey, Prado, aboard the colt for winter workouts in Florida.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,Sun Reporter | May 16, 2008
His back is swayed like a Nike swoosh. His shaggy coat, a sign of age, would warm a woolly mammoth. At 28 - ancient for horses - Deputed Testamony looks like he should live at Charlestown. The retirement community, not the racetrack. Yet there he was, at 8 a.m., cavorting like a youngster in a grassy 2 1/2 -acre paddock at Bonita Farm in Darlington. In a nearby paddock, another stallion ambled nearer. In a flash, Deputed Testamony crested his neck in defiance and gave the interloper the stink eye. Hardly the spirit you'd expect of the oldest surviving Preakness winner.
SPORTS
By Brad Snyder and Brad Snyder,Sun Staff Writer | May 21, 1995
Bill Boniface Jr. stuck with superstition at yesterday's Preakness, and it almost led another one of his Maryland-bred horses to victory.His horse, Oliver's Twist, finished second, a half-length behind Timber Country and a half-length away from being the first Maryland-bred winner of the Preakness since Boniface's Deputed Testamony in 1983.The Harford County trainer was pleased that he followed the same pre-race routine with Oliver's Twist as he did with Deputed Testamony."I'm not superstitious," Boniface said, "but it doesn't hurt to be careful."
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,Sun Reporter | May 16, 2008
His back is swayed like a Nike swoosh. His shaggy coat, a sign of age, would warm a woolly mammoth. At 28 - ancient for horses - Deputed Testamony looks like he should live at Charlestown. The retirement community, not the racetrack. Yet there he was, at 8 a.m., cavorting like a youngster in a grassy 2 1/2 -acre paddock at Bonita Farm in Darlington. In a nearby paddock, another stallion ambled nearer. In a flash, Deputed Testamony crested his neck in defiance and gave the interloper the stink eye. Hardly the spirit you'd expect of the oldest surviving Preakness winner.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN REPORTER | May 17, 2007
In 30 years working with horses, Sykesville trainer Nancy Alberts had come about as close to the Preakness as most Marylanders. She'd watched the race on television. "I never dreamed I'd be in a big race like that," she said. But the talk in early 2002 said that no horse had emerged as a Triple Crown front-runner. And she had a medium-sized bay gelding named Magic Weisner who seemed to run a little better every time out. When she announced plans to saddle him in the Preakness, some local thoroughbred watchers told her she shouldn't lest she embarrass herself and the horse.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2005
Legal Control battled foot problems and Preakness runner Malibu Moonshine in his most recent efforts and didn't fare well. Both experiences were behind him yesterday and the son of Thunder Gulch returned to front-running form, holding off Monster Chaser and It's Time to Smile to win the $50,000 Deputed Testamony Stakes at Pimlico Race Course. With Luis Garcia replacing regular rider Jozbin Santana, Legal Control needed sound hooves to prevail by a head over Monster Chaser, who was a neck in front of It's Time to Smile.
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