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By Dr. Genevieve Matanoski and Dr. Genevieve Matanoski,Medical Tribune News Service | April 26, 1994
Tomorrow is Secretaries' Day. Across the country, men and women will make a particular effort to thank the people who make up their support staffs. But while secretaries are being thanked, let's also take a minute to look at their attitudes toward their work and the impact it may have on their total sense of well-being.Several years ago, William Eaton, Ph.D., professor of mental hygiene at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, published a study on the prevalence of depression in different occupations.
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By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | April 26, 1995
Martha Manning had long rejected electroconvulsive therapy -- "shock treatments" -- as a cruel relic of a less sophisticated era. She developed that bias in the 1970s while training to become a psychologist.Her opposition began to crumble five years ago when talk therapy and medications failed to rescue her from a major depression that seemed to be pulling her inexorably toward death. She said she never planned to kill herself -- her commitment to her teen-age daughter was too strong -- but found herself fantasizing about the relief that could come from speeding cars and guns.
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By Susan Gilbert and Susan Gilbert,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 18, 1997
There is a perception in some circles that everyone either is taking an anti-depressant or knows someone who is taking one. Prozac and Zoloft are household words, and the sales of these drugs have soared to the point where the global market for all anti-depressants is estimated at $6 billion a year.But at the same time a panel of experts recently concluded that depression is still being under-diagnosed and under-treated.For most people with clinical depression, the disorder is either undiagnosed or misdiagnosed, the panel reports in last month's issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.
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By Dr. Genevieve Matanoski and Dr. Genevieve Matanoski,Contributing Writer | September 8, 1992
Unlike many physical illnesses, depression in women goes largely undiagnosed and untreated. An estimated 7 million women suffer from depression, which is about twice the rate for men.Popular theory suggests that women are diagnosed more because they are more willing to seek help. However, research suggests the circumstances in women's lives contribute to the higher incidence of major depression. Women are at higher risk because they are likely to experience less power in their jobs and homes, physical and sexual abuse, discrimination and stresses from childbearing and child-rearing.
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By Dr. Genevieve Matanoski and Dr. Genevieve Matanoski,Contributing Writer | March 23, 1993
Last week's column was about the things that make it more likely for a woman to get depressed -- conditions such as aging, poverty, unemployment, marital status or loss of a loved one. Because one out of 12 women shows signs of depression, a lot of women are interested in this information.Q: What are "precipitating" or serious life events that can bring on depression?A: Serious life events generally involve a loss that throws a person's life into turmoil. The death of a loved one, job loss, divorce or breaking up are among the most difficult losses.
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By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Evening Sun Staff | April 18, 1991
Depression made Mike Wallace's arms ache and his legs tingle.It made his head swim; it eroded his confidence; it came between the interviewer and his next question.Depression made Wallace "feel like a fraud and a fake and like everything that had been good in my life had been blind luck. I really began to feel lower than a snake's belly," said the veteran CBS News reporter and correspondent on "60 Minutes."Wallace came to Baltimore yesterday to share his insights on depression with more than 500 mental health professionals at the Mood Disorders Research/Education Symposium at Johns Hopkins Hospital.
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By SUSAN BRINK and SUSAN BRINK,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 26, 2006
"Wear a smile and you have friends; wear a scowl and you have wrinkles." - George Eliot Inspired by age-old literary wisdom, countless song lyrics and the 1872 musings of Charles Darwin, a very 2006 theory to treat depression has emerged. Why not turn that frown upside down - with a shot of Botox? By preventing the physical act of frowning, the muscle-paralyzing toxin just might ease depression. A small-scale pilot trial, published in the May 15 journal Dermatologic Surgery, found that Botox injected into frown lines around the mouth or in forehead furrows of 10 women eliminated depression symptoms in nine of them and reduced symptoms in the 10th.
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By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Special to The Sun | December 20, 1994
Q: I have always heard that fat people are supposed to be jolly. Well, my wife has been fat for many years, and she has been depressed, not jolly.Are fat people depressed more often than normal weight people?A: In general, overweight people are more likely to be depressed then normal weight people. Distressing features of being overweight frequently include the negative attitude of others toward obese individuals and the view in this country that "thin is beautiful."At the worst, these attitudes lead to subtle discrimination in hiring for jobs.
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By Holly Selby | September 13, 2007
Depression affects more than 6.5 million of the 35 million Americans who are 65 years or older, according to the National Alliance on Mental Illness. But often the symptoms of depression, which can include fatigue, overall sadness and loss of interest in activities, go unidentified or ignored among the elderly, says Veronica Poklemba, a clinical nurse specialist at Levindale Hebrew Geriatric Center and Hospital in Baltimore. Why is it of particular importance to identify and treat depression in the elderly?
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