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Depression

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NEWS
May 9, 2011
Depression is one of the most common illnesses young people face, and as Melissa Healy's article ("Depressed teens mostly struggle alone" April 29) highlighted, far too many teenagers with the illness never receive adequate treatment. While identifying young people who are suffering is an essential step, larger issues remain. There is a tremendous stigma associated with mental illness. With the emergence of education and awareness campaigns around depression, many people now understand the signs and symptoms of the illness, but the negative connotations that come with the diagnosis remain.
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NEWS
By René J. Muller | September 23, 2014
Suicide is an uncommon phenomenon. When you consider what people suffer because of medical illness, physical injury, the deprivations of old age, mental illness, personal failure and the betrayal by others, one wonders why more people don't choose to end their lives. Many are deterred from suicide by religious dictates, the social stigma associated with giving up in the face of hardship and the reluctance to abandon others by making this kind of exit. Even without these proscriptions, and under the most trying circumstances, life is often obstinately embraced until the very end. People just don't want to die. Many of us have thought about the possibility of taking our lives at some point, wondering what would happen if the steering wheel were turned just slightly to the left as an oncoming car approaches, or considering the consequences of jumping out of a window eight stories up. Most of us quickly reject the projected outcome of these actions.
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NEWS
November 9, 2010
I am appalled that The Baltimore Sun in its investigative zest has portrayed Baltimore Behavioral Health as a greedy, improperly diagnosing, non-caring and potentially criminal operation ( "Hooked on treatment," Nov. 7 and "Sheltered addicts, strained recovery," Nov. 8). What The Sun fails to realize is that when drug addicts finally seek treatment, they are desperate — they have ruined health and family life, job loss, financial crisis or criminal court order to be in treatment.
NEWS
August 25, 2014
As a person who lives with recurring clinical depression and also is the facilitator of a local Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance support group for people with mood disorders and their loved ones, I thank Mark Hanna for his eloquent description of depression and plea for public understanding of this disease and compassion for people living with it ( "Robin Williams' death holds lessons for the living," Aug. 18). Additionally, I thank Pastor Hanna for generously providing space for, and encouragement to, our support group.
NEWS
By Russell Baker | December 19, 1991
FUN GALORE, caterers to the avant-garde of chic, are happy to announce an entirely new party concept for our patrons. We call it the Depression Wingding and predict it will be the most exciting new thing to hit the fun scene since junk bonds.Be the first in your crowd to throw a Depression Wingding. Phone Fun Galore today for our amazingly low, low rates.Yes, low, low, low!Because remember, you'll be evoking the wonderful spirit of good old Depression days when men who had once built railroads actually stood on street corners, believe it or not, saying crazy things like, "Buddy, can you spare a dime?"
NEWS
By MIKE BOWLER | November 26, 1991
THANKSGIVING 1936.Fifty-five years ago, Nov. 26, 1936, Baltimore was reeling from the Depression. Unemployment was high. Across the Atlantic, Hitler's menace was sensed but not fully realized.Ruxton suits were reduced to $18 at Stewart's.Molly Picon was on stage at the Hippodrome. On the screen at the Hipp -- Irene Dunne, "who makes 'My Man Godfrey' and 'Mr. Deeds' both look like sissies," according to the Hipp ad. Dunne was starring in "Theodora Goes Wild."The Gas & Electric Co. was advertising the "1937" Zenith radio, "the radio a year ahead of its time," for $52.95.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2013
The season's second tropical depression formed Monday along the Mexican coast, nearly two weeks after Tropical Storm Andrea, but it's uncertain whether it will become Tropical Storm Barry. The system was bringing heavy rains to the Yucatan Peninsula, Belize and Guatemala -- as much as 6-8 inches in some areas by radar estimates, according to the Weather Underground. But it is not highly organized or packing strong winds, with maximum gusts of 30 mph, according to the National Hurricane Center.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 26, 1990
People who have experienced depression are especially vulnerable to nicotine addiction and have a particularly hard time quitting smoking, according to new research that suggests that many people use smoking as a form of "self-medication" against anxiety and pain.The findings are considered important because of the dire health consequences of smoking and the difficulties of smoking cessation. The research suggests that for some people, it may be unrealistic to expect to quit smoking without first being treated for depression.
FEATURES
October 4, 1998
Thursday is National Depression Screening Day, marked by various Baltimore-area health services offering free screenings for depression, which affects 16 million Americans. To find a screening near you, call 800-573-4433.The screenings, intended to gauge need for further evaluation, involves taking the following questionnaire, developed by Dr. Douglas G. Jacobs of Wellesley, Mass., director of National Depression Screening Day. It is designed to be used in conjunction with an evaluation by a health care professional.
NEWS
May 25, 1993
Quite apart from its long-term effects on the political scene in the District of Columbia, the suicide death last week of City Council President John Wilson has refocused attention on the debilitating and often deadly disorder known as clinical depression. Mr. Wilson's family suggested he had taken his own life as a result of a severe depression that began several months ago, the last of a series of such episodes that had plagued his life.Depression affects some 20 million Americans, according to medical experts, and accounts for as much as 80 percent of the suicides in this country.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | August 13, 2014
Among the heartfelt tributes, the death of Robin Williams has also drawn what is now a predictable response - people saying stupid and insensitive things about depression and suicide while babbling too long in front of the camera or posting intemperate outbursts on Twitter. Fox News host Shepard Smith ended a marathon broadcast by calling Williams a "coward," after inviting the audience to imagine raising three children as Williams did. "And yet, something inside you is so horrible or you're such a coward or whatever the reason that you decide that you have to end it. Robin Williams, at 63, did that today," he said.
FEATURES
By Arlene Karidis, For The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
A nimals have done it since the beginning of time. Women in Asia and Africa have done it for centuries. But lately, more women in Western cultures are turning to an ancient practice.  Following childbirth, they are ingesting their placenta - after it's been steamed, dehydrated and put into capsules.  These new mothers and some health practitioners say this tissue, which nourishes the baby in utero, can also nourish the mother. Limited published research suggests ingesting the placenta, or placentophagia, also helps with lactation and postpartum depression because of the hormones it contains.  The idea has gained popularity as celebrities share their experiences with placenta.
NEWS
April 26, 2014
Of course there is no real discourse or difference between the gubernatorial candidates for Maryland, for the press refuses to recognize parties other than the Democrats ( "Back seat bickering," April 22). This is what you get in a "one party state": six figure career politicians looking for a promotion. This would change if there were real reporting and examination of the current issues by the constitutionally delegated "free press. " As for the candidates, their advertisements prove everything.
NEWS
April 15, 2014
To say I was appalled by Richard Vatz's recent commentary on mental illness would be an understatement ( "Stigma can be a good thing," April 8). Mr. Vatz takes us back more than 50 years to psychiatrist and author Thomas Szasz' book, "The Myth of Mental Illness," while ignoring all the research and studies done since then. Mr. Vatz must lead a perfect life, with no depression, no thought disorder, no PTSD and no mood disorder, not even anxiety. So he's fine with stigmatizing all of the people he sees as having "fake" complaints who act out behaviors they "choose" to engage in. As he sees it, if you didn't seek help - and here I refer especially to what we know about Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans - it's your own fault, not because there is stigma.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
The man shot to death this week by Baltimore County police had approached officers with a knife before, according to court documents in a January incident that bears striking similarities to this week's case. The department identified the man killed Tuesday as 21-year-old Ryan Charles Deitrich, who they said charged at officers with a knife before at least one of them shot him multiple times. Investigators had flagged his home on Oakleigh Road in Parkville as a potential hazard, a spokeswoman said, and had taken him once for an emergency evaluation.
NEWS
January 28, 2014
Outgoing Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke, 60, probably won't win many popularity contests. He's frequently been vilified by the political left for doing too little and by the right for doing too much. Most Americans probably have no idea what he does - and, whether in full-blown crisis or too-slow growth, the U.S. economy, his chief responsibility as head of the nation's central bank since 2006, has been underwhelming for most of his tenure. But he will be remembered as being the right man for the times.
NEWS
By Richard W. Smith | December 11, 1991
IN ONE state capital after another, angry citizens are marching against their governors and legislators. If they are not waving placards proclaiming the vileness of tax increases, they are chanting against the unfairness of cuts in services. "Morning in America" is as dark as midnight, and it's not even lunchtime.But prosperity in America has had a long run. If you are under 55, you have no memories at all of the Depression. You have to be 65 to have spent your childhood in the '30s. You have to be 75 to remember trying to find a job at a time when young men thought themselves lucky to be in the Civilian Conservation Corps or the Works Progress Administration, two make-work programs of the '30s.
NEWS
By Catherine Foster | January 3, 2000
I suspect I have a different relationship with oranges than do most people. My father always placed one in the toe of our Christmas stockings, as was the old Depression-era custom. Then, an orange given for Christmas was a rare and wonderful gift -- a burst of sweetness in a grim diet of oatmeal. My father carried on this tradition and so our stockings would droop with the weight of this instructive gift. There were many such instructive gifts, and sometimes our shoulders drooped with the weight of them.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | January 6, 2014
Thirty-minute bouts of daily meditation can help ease symptoms of anxiety and depression, a new Johns Hopkins Medicine analysis has found. Researchers at Hopkins analyzed previous studies and found that meditation seemed to provide as much relief for people with mild anxiety and depression as antidepressants. The researchers looked at 47 clinical trials performed through June 2013 involving 3,515 patients. The studies focused on the impact of meditation on mental and physical health issues, including depression, anxiety, stress, insomnia, diabetes, heart disease, cancer and chronic pain.
NEWS
By Rada K. Dagher | October 9, 2013
Miriam Carey, a 34 year-old dental hygienist, created a media frenzy last week when she was shot and killed by Capitol police after ramming a White House barricade in her car while her one-year-old daughter was in the back seat. Why did she do it? What mental illness did she suffer from? Ms. Carey's mother said her daughter was diagnosed with postpartum depression after her baby was born, and months later she was hospitalized for feeling sick and depressed. Some media outlets took that to mean that postpartum depression was behind Ms. Carey's erratic behavior.
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