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Depo Provera

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By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 26, 1995
When I heard about Depo-Provera, it sounded like the no-muss, no-fuss, long-acting contraceptive I had been wishing for. But shortly after the shot my sex drive disappeared.I guess it's no wonder women don't get pregnant if they all feel like I do. How long will this go on?The natural hormone progesterone can depress libido, and the ingredient in Depo-Provera, medroxyprogesterone, can have a similar effect.Some people are more susceptible to this side effect than others, and it sounds as if you are sensitive to this reaction.
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NEWS
By Megan Kennedy and Megan Kennedy,contributing writer | February 21, 1999
After giving birth, a 19-year-old Baltimore resident headed to Planned Parenthood and got her first injection of the contraceptive Depo-Provera. One year later, she "likes Depo because I don't have time to remember to take the pill."This young mother is one of the many teens who are finding Depo-Provera a more convenient, more reliable method of birth control. In fact, family planning counselors say the reason teen pregnancy rates have dropped in both Baltimore and the nation is due, in part, to Depo-Provera.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | October 30, 1992
The Food and Drug Administration swept away decades of controversy yesterday by approving the drug Depo Provera for use as an injectable contraceptive for women that gives three months of birth control with each shot.Family planning doctors hailed the action, predicting that it will be embraced by hundreds of thousands of U.S. women eager for a long-term contraceptive that requires no maintenance except a new injection every 90 days."I think it's a tremendous step forward," said Dr. Edward Wallach, chairman of obstetrics and gynecology at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 26, 1995
When I heard about Depo-Provera, it sounded like the no-muss, no-fuss, long-acting contraceptive I had been wishing for. But shortly after the shot my sex drive disappeared.I guess it's no wonder women don't get pregnant if they all feel like I do. How long will this go on?The natural hormone progesterone can depress libido, and the ingredient in Depo-Provera, medroxyprogesterone, can have a similar effect.Some people are more susceptible to this side effect than others, and it sounds as if you are sensitive to this reaction.
NEWS
By Marlene Cimons and Marlene Cimons,Los Angeles Times | June 20, 1992
WASHINGTON -- A federal advisory panel recommended yesterday that the government approve Depo-Provera, a highly effective but controversial contraceptive that provides three months of protection with a single injection.The drug, manufactured by the Upjohn Co. of Kalamazoo, Mich., is already marketed in more than 90 countries -- including the Britain, Germany, France, New Zealand, and Sweden -- and has been used by an estimated 30 million women worldwide.But it has repeatedly failed to win approval in the United States for the past 25 years because of concerns, raised in animal studies, that the drug increased the risk of cancers of the cervix, liver and breast.
NEWS
By Megan Kennedy and Megan Kennedy,contributing writer | February 21, 1999
After giving birth, a 19-year-old Baltimore resident headed to Planned Parenthood and got her first injection of the contraceptive Depo-Provera. One year later, she "likes Depo because I don't have time to remember to take the pill."This young mother is one of the many teens who are finding Depo-Provera a more convenient, more reliable method of birth control. In fact, family planning counselors say the reason teen pregnancy rates have dropped in both Baltimore and the nation is due, in part, to Depo-Provera.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | October 30, 1992
The Food and Drug Administration swept away decades of controversy yesterday by approving the drug Depo Provera for use as an injectable contraceptive that gives three months of birth control with each shot.Immediately, family planning doctors hailed the action, predicting that it will be embraced by hundreds of thousands of U.S. women eager for a long-term contraceptive that requires no maintenance except a new injection every 90 days."I think it's a tremendous step forward," said Dr. Edward Wallach, chairman of obstetrics and gynecology at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.
NEWS
November 7, 1992
"Pro choice" has been the great rallying cry for abortion rights, but in reality American women have had relatively few choices when it comes to reproductive freedom. In recent years, at least one promising new form of birth control has gotten tangled up in the abortion debate -- RU-486, the French pill that prevents a fertilized egg from implanting in the womb. But the greater dampening effect on the development and marketing of new contraceptives came after women won multimillion-dollar judgments for damages suffered from Dalkon Shields, a defective brand of IUD, or intra-uterine device.
FEATURES
By Fawn Vrazo and Fawn Vrazo,Knight-Ridder News Service | November 14, 1994
Women call it The Shot.Like its predecessor, The Pill, it promises freedom from pregnancy. But there is a big difference -- one that has women by the thousands flocking to ob-gyn offices, public clinics and student health centers across the country.Women have to remember to take The Pill daily. They have to get The Shot just once every three months.That difference seems to account for the growing and unexpected popularity of injectable Depo-Provera, approved as a contraceptive two years ago by the Food and Drug Administration.
NEWS
By Arthur Caplan | February 9, 1993
THE pharmaceutical industry in the United States is getting away with extortion.The latest example of how drug companies rip off the public is the Upjohn Co.'s decision to jack up the price of Depo-Provera.Depo-Provera has been on the market for some time as a cancer drug. It cost $12 a dose. Last October the Food and Drug Administration cleared Depo-Provera for use as an injectable contraceptive. Upjohn quickly raised the price to $34 a dose.Since a woman using Depo-Provera as a method of contraception needs to get an injection about once every three months, that works out to a yearly cost of about $134.
FEATURES
By Fawn Vrazo and Fawn Vrazo,Knight-Ridder News Service | November 14, 1994
Women call it The Shot.Like its predecessor, The Pill, it promises freedom from pregnancy. But there is a big difference -- one that has women by the thousands flocking to ob-gyn offices, public clinics and student health centers across the country.Women have to remember to take The Pill daily. They have to get The Shot just once every three months.That difference seems to account for the growing and unexpected popularity of injectable Depo-Provera, approved as a contraceptive two years ago by the Food and Drug Administration.
NEWS
By Arthur Caplan | April 15, 1994
IF YOU are a woman and thinking about using birth control, do you know what costs $21.97, $29.50 or $18.30 -- depending on who is paying?If you said a single shot of Depo-Provera, I'd be flabbergasted, but you would be right.But whether or not you solved this puzzle, the different prices being charged for this newly available contraceptive reveal a lot about some of the problems facing women who want to use this or other long-term forms of birth control.Depo-Provera is a contraceptive for women that is taken by injection.
NEWS
By Arthur Caplan | February 9, 1993
THE pharmaceutical industry in the United States is getting away with extortion.The latest example of how drug companies rip off the public is the Upjohn Co.'s decision to jack up the price of Depo-Provera.Depo-Provera has been on the market for some time as a cancer drug. It cost $12 a dose. Last October the Food and Drug Administration cleared Depo-Provera for use as an injectable contraceptive. Upjohn quickly raised the price to $34 a dose.Since a woman using Depo-Provera as a method of contraception needs to get an injection about once every three months, that works out to a yearly cost of about $134.
NEWS
November 7, 1992
"Pro choice" has been the great rallying cry for abortion rights, but in reality American women have had relatively few choices when it comes to reproductive freedom. In recent years, at least one promising new form of birth control has gotten tangled up in the abortion debate -- RU-486, the French pill that prevents a fertilized egg from implanting in the womb. But the greater dampening effect on the development and marketing of new contraceptives came after women won multimillion-dollar judgments for damages suffered from Dalkon Shields, a defective brand of IUD, or intra-uterine device.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | October 30, 1992
The Food and Drug Administration swept away decades of controversy yesterday by approving the drug Depo Provera for use as an injectable contraceptive that gives three months of birth control with each shot.Immediately, family planning doctors hailed the action, predicting that it will be embraced by hundreds of thousands of U.S. women eager for a long-term contraceptive that requires no maintenance except a new injection every 90 days."I think it's a tremendous step forward," said Dr. Edward Wallach, chairman of obstetrics and gynecology at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | October 30, 1992
The Food and Drug Administration swept away decades of controversy yesterday by approving the drug Depo Provera for use as an injectable contraceptive for women that gives three months of birth control with each shot.Family planning doctors hailed the action, predicting that it will be embraced by hundreds of thousands of U.S. women eager for a long-term contraceptive that requires no maintenance except a new injection every 90 days."I think it's a tremendous step forward," said Dr. Edward Wallach, chairman of obstetrics and gynecology at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.
NEWS
By Arthur Caplan | April 15, 1994
IF YOU are a woman and thinking about using birth control, do you know what costs $21.97, $29.50 or $18.30 -- depending on who is paying?If you said a single shot of Depo-Provera, I'd be flabbergasted, but you would be right.But whether or not you solved this puzzle, the different prices being charged for this newly available contraceptive reveal a lot about some of the problems facing women who want to use this or other long-term forms of birth control.Depo-Provera is a contraceptive for women that is taken by injection.
NEWS
August 23, 2004
Depo Provera raises risk for two STDs among women The contraceptive Depo Provera appears to increase a woman's risk of contracting two sexually transmitted diseases, scientists announced today. Women using the contraceptive, which is injected four times a year, had more than three times the risk of developing chlamydia and gonorrhea than women not using a hormonal contraceptive. The study, funded bytwo federal agencies, involved 819 women recruited from two health clinics in Baltimore and Towson.
NEWS
By Marlene Cimons and Marlene Cimons,Los Angeles Times | June 20, 1992
WASHINGTON -- A federal advisory panel recommended yesterday that the government approve Depo-Provera, a highly effective but controversial contraceptive that provides three months of protection with a single injection.The drug, manufactured by the Upjohn Co. of Kalamazoo, Mich., is already marketed in more than 90 countries -- including the Britain, Germany, France, New Zealand, and Sweden -- and has been used by an estimated 30 million women worldwide.But it has repeatedly failed to win approval in the United States for the past 25 years because of concerns, raised in animal studies, that the drug increased the risk of cancers of the cervix, liver and breast.
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