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By Rahul Mahajan | February 4, 2001
SOME OF THE armor-piercing, tank-killing depleted-uranium ammunition used in combat by the U.S. military was contaminated with highly radioactive substances, possibly including plutonium, according to a recent Swiss study. That simple scientific fact has serious political consequences for the United States. Large amounts of depleted-uranium shells were used during the Persian Gulf war and more recently in Kosovo. Peace activists and U.S. military scientists for some time have expressed concerns about the health effects even of "uncontaminated" depleted uranium, including claims of links to severe birth defects, leukemia and the mysterious Gulf War Syndrome in U.S. veterans.
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TOPIC
By Rahul Mahajan | February 4, 2001
SOME OF THE armor-piercing, tank-killing depleted-uranium ammunition used in combat by the U.S. military was contaminated with highly radioactive substances, possibly including plutonium, according to a recent Swiss study. That simple scientific fact has serious political consequences for the United States. Large amounts of depleted-uranium shells were used during the Persian Gulf war and more recently in Kosovo. Peace activists and U.S. military scientists for some time have expressed concerns about the health effects even of "uncontaminated" depleted uranium, including claims of links to severe birth defects, leukemia and the mysterious Gulf War Syndrome in U.S. veterans.
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By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | April 4, 2000
On the day Philip Berrigan and three companions went on trial in Towson for a protest action against depleted-uranium weapons, NATO confirmed for the first time the use of DU ammunition in Kosovo, and the United Nations warned that children should be kept away from old target zones. In December, these activists from the Plowshares movement hammered on A-10 Warthog warplanes at the Maryland Air National Guard base in Essex and poured blood over them in symbolic protest against military use of depleted uranium.
NEWS
January 17, 2001
Graziano's mistake offers chance to reach the gay community While it is tempting to remain focused on the attempt to remove city Housing Commissioner Paul T. Graziano for his deplorable behavior, it is more constructive for gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered Baltimoreans to look for ways to ensure such a debacle will never be repeated. The Baltimore Activists Coalition has submitted a plan to the mayor to do just that. If the mayor seizes the opportunity now, he can make a significant difference in the lives of the very people castigated by his housing commissioner.
TOPIC
By Carl Schoettler | January 14, 2001
THE BIBLICAL OBSERVATION about the prophet without honor in his own country has taken a sadly ironic turn for Philip F. Berrigan, Baltimore's immutable peace activist. Berrigan remains locked in a Maryland prison for protesting the use of depleted-uranium ammunition by American and NATO troops during the war in Kosovo. But last week health fears surged across Europe about possible depleted-uranium-caused cancers among soldiers serving as peacekeepers in Kosovo. Leaders of a half-dozen European countries demanded inquiries into the potential for cancer among their soldiers exposed to dust or debris from radioactive depleted-uranium anti-tank projectiles.
NEWS
April 14, 2000
Depleted uranium is always dangerous and should be banned Thanks to Carl Schoettler for his informative article "Battle over depleted-uranium arms" (Sun Journal, April 4). The caption on the accompanying photograph of a tank, however, was incorrect. The Abrams tank is plated with depleted uranium, not because it's denser than lead, but because it's harder than steel. Lead is denser than steel, but no one would use such a soft metal for armor plate. Hardness is the governing factor. The heavy weight of a uranium projectile, as well as its great hardness, causes it to penetrate just about any armor.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 10, 2001
LONDON - Nearly two years after the 78-day Yugoslav air war stretched the limits of NATO cooperation, the 19-nation alliance is facing a new struggle: a mounting European public relations disaster over "Balkan syndrome." Yesterday, Britain reversed its policy and joined other European countries offering voluntary medical tests for troops fearful they might have been exposed to depleted uranium in the Balkans, most prominently in ammunition used by U.S. forces in the 1999 Kosovo conflict.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2000
A Baltimore County Circuit Court judge denied yesterday a request by Philip F. Berrigan and three co-defendants to allow experts to testify at their trial on the legality of their arrests Dec. 19 at a Maryland Air National Guard base in Essex. Judge James T. Smith Jr. ruled that Berrigan, 76, of Baltimore; Susan Crane, 56, also of Baltimore; the Rev. Stephen Kelly, 50, a Jesuit priest from New York City; and Elizabeth Walz, 33, a Dominican nun from Philadelphia, may not have experts testify on laws regarding the use of depleted uranium in military weapons.
NEWS
January 11, 2001
NO ENEMY threatens the 19-member North Atlantic Treaty Organization. But some members' fears that their troops' health is endangered by other members could sow distrust and weaken the alliance from within. Much depends on whether NATO makes good on the promise by its secretary-general, Lord Robertson, to share all information about the effects of depleted uranium shells and missiles fired during Balkan campaigns in the 1990s. The United States, Britain and France used such ammunition.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2000
A prosecutor told the jury members they would hear evidence in a simple case involving trespassing and malicious destruction of property. But peace activist Philip F. Berrigan turned yesterday's case against him and three co-defendants on charges of damaging two jet fighters last December into a sermon about the perils of nuclear war and his commitment to world peace. Berrigan, 76, of Baltimore, is being tried with three other peace activists: Susan Crane, 56, also of Baltimore; the Rev. Stephen Kelly, 50, a Jesuit priest from New York City; and Elizabeth Waltz, 33, a Catholic Worker from Philadelphia.
TOPIC
By Carl Schoettler | January 14, 2001
THE BIBLICAL OBSERVATION about the prophet without honor in his own country has taken a sadly ironic turn for Philip F. Berrigan, Baltimore's immutable peace activist. Berrigan remains locked in a Maryland prison for protesting the use of depleted-uranium ammunition by American and NATO troops during the war in Kosovo. But last week health fears surged across Europe about possible depleted-uranium-caused cancers among soldiers serving as peacekeepers in Kosovo. Leaders of a half-dozen European countries demanded inquiries into the potential for cancer among their soldiers exposed to dust or debris from radioactive depleted-uranium anti-tank projectiles.
NEWS
January 11, 2001
NO ENEMY threatens the 19-member North Atlantic Treaty Organization. But some members' fears that their troops' health is endangered by other members could sow distrust and weaken the alliance from within. Much depends on whether NATO makes good on the promise by its secretary-general, Lord Robertson, to share all information about the effects of depleted uranium shells and missiles fired during Balkan campaigns in the 1990s. The United States, Britain and France used such ammunition.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 10, 2001
LONDON - Nearly two years after the 78-day Yugoslav air war stretched the limits of NATO cooperation, the 19-nation alliance is facing a new struggle: a mounting European public relations disaster over "Balkan syndrome." Yesterday, Britain reversed its policy and joined other European countries offering voluntary medical tests for troops fearful they might have been exposed to depleted uranium in the Balkans, most prominently in ammunition used by U.S. forces in the 1999 Kosovo conflict.
NEWS
April 14, 2000
Depleted uranium is always dangerous and should be banned Thanks to Carl Schoettler for his informative article "Battle over depleted-uranium arms" (Sun Journal, April 4). The caption on the accompanying photograph of a tank, however, was incorrect. The Abrams tank is plated with depleted uranium, not because it's denser than lead, but because it's harder than steel. Lead is denser than steel, but no one would use such a soft metal for armor plate. Hardness is the governing factor. The heavy weight of a uranium projectile, as well as its great hardness, causes it to penetrate just about any armor.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | April 4, 2000
On the day Philip Berrigan and three companions went on trial in Towson for a protest action against depleted-uranium weapons, NATO confirmed for the first time the use of DU ammunition in Kosovo, and the United Nations warned that children should be kept away from old target zones. In December, these activists from the Plowshares movement hammered on A-10 Warthog warplanes at the Maryland Air National Guard base in Essex and poured blood over them in symbolic protest against military use of depleted uranium.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2000
A prosecutor told the jury members they would hear evidence in a simple case involving trespassing and malicious destruction of property. But peace activist Philip F. Berrigan turned yesterday's case against him and three co-defendants on charges of damaging two jet fighters last December into a sermon about the perils of nuclear war and his commitment to world peace. Berrigan, 76, of Baltimore, is being tried with three other peace activists: Susan Crane, 56, also of Baltimore; the Rev. Stephen Kelly, 50, a Jesuit priest from New York City; and Elizabeth Waltz, 33, a Catholic Worker from Philadelphia.
NEWS
January 17, 2001
Graziano's mistake offers chance to reach the gay community While it is tempting to remain focused on the attempt to remove city Housing Commissioner Paul T. Graziano for his deplorable behavior, it is more constructive for gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered Baltimoreans to look for ways to ensure such a debacle will never be repeated. The Baltimore Activists Coalition has submitted a plan to the mayor to do just that. If the mayor seizes the opportunity now, he can make a significant difference in the lives of the very people castigated by his housing commissioner.
NEWS
By Kurt Streeter and Kurt Streeter,SUN STAFF | December 20, 1999
Longtime peace activist Philip Berrigan and three others were arrested yesterday after they sprayed two jet fighters with what they said was their own blood and beat on one with hammers at the Maryland Air National Guard base at Martin State Airport.According to Maj. Robert Gould, an Air National Guard spokesman, the activists used bolt cutters to get through a fence at the Middle River facility about 4 a.m.They hammered on the exterior of an A-10 Thunderbolt jet fighter, Gould said, and splashed blood on two of the aircraft, which cost about $8 million each.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2000
A Baltimore County Circuit Court judge denied yesterday a request by Philip F. Berrigan and three co-defendants to allow experts to testify at their trial on the legality of their arrests Dec. 19 at a Maryland Air National Guard base in Essex. Judge James T. Smith Jr. ruled that Berrigan, 76, of Baltimore; Susan Crane, 56, also of Baltimore; the Rev. Stephen Kelly, 50, a Jesuit priest from New York City; and Elizabeth Walz, 33, a Dominican nun from Philadelphia, may not have experts testify on laws regarding the use of depleted uranium in military weapons.
NEWS
By Kurt Streeter and Kurt Streeter,SUN STAFF | December 20, 1999
Longtime peace activist Philip Berrigan and three others were arrested yesterday after they sprayed two jet fighters with what they said was their own blood and beat on one with hammers at the Maryland Air National Guard base at Martin State Airport.According to Maj. Robert Gould, an Air National Guard spokesman, the activists used bolt cutters to get through a fence at the Middle River facility about 4 a.m.They hammered on the exterior of an A-10 Thunderbolt jet fighter, Gould said, and splashed blood on two of the aircraft, which cost about $8 million each.
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