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NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau | February 24, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Maryland's biggest welfare program supports dependent children. But a Baltimore County legislator thinks there should be limits on how many children the state should support.Del. Richard Rynd, a Pikesville Democrat, is pushing a bill that would deny, or at least limit, additional benefits to women who have additional children after they're on welfare.It would cut in half the extra payment mothers now receive under the Aid to Families with Dependent Children program when they give birth to another child.
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NEWS
May 19, 1996
FORGET ABOUT AFDC. There's a new acronym in town, FIP. Under a bill signed into law this week by Gov. Parris Glendening, Aid to Families with Dependent Children -- better known as "welfare" -- is being replaced by the Family Investment Program. The difference is stark. AFDC encourages dependency through welfare; FIP stresses self-sufficiency through work.Thus, Maryland joins 36 other states revamping their public assistance programs. So far, the nationwide movement away from traditional welfare seems to be working: Nearly 1.3 million Americans have left the rolls in just three years.
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NEWS
May 19, 1996
FORGET ABOUT AFDC. There's a new acronym in town, FIP. Under a bill signed into law this week by Gov. Parris Glendening, Aid to Families with Dependent Children -- better known as "welfare" -- is being replaced by the Family Investment Program. The difference is stark. AFDC encourages dependency through welfare; FIP stresses self-sufficiency through work.Thus, Maryland joins 36 other states revamping their public assistance programs. So far, the nationwide movement away from traditional welfare seems to be working: Nearly 1.3 million Americans have left the rolls in just three years.
NEWS
By Robert Rector | July 20, 1995
IN THE battle over welfare reform, the blame game already has started. The White House stands ready to point the accusing finger at Congress, if lawmakers dare to take the tough steps that are needed, while Congress cowers in fear at the thought of being blamed for "lacking compassion."But hope springs eternal. Just in case Washington decides it wants to forget politics, here are a few of the steps it can take to get welfare spending under control and break the cycle of dependency:* The growth of total welfare spending must be capped at 3 percent per year.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau | February 24, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Maryland's biggest welfare program supports dependent children. But a Baltimore County legislator thinks there should be limits on how many children the state should support.Del. Richard Rynd, a Pikesville Democrat, is pushing a bill that would deny, or at least limit, additional benefits to women who have additional children after they're on welfare.It would cut in half the extra payment mothers now receive under the Aid to Families with Dependent Children program when they give birth to another child.
NEWS
May 23, 1994
A LETTER from a long-time reader provides some historical perspective on the current debate about welfare reform. He writes as follows:"I was a social worker in a county welfare department in the late 1930s when the ADC [Aid to Dependent Children] program, as it was then identified, saw the light of day. Why ADC? Simply because assistance was provided exclusively for children: $18 for the first child, $12 for each additional, on the basis of eligibility of course. Supplemental payments came from the locally financed General Public Assistance program -- in very limited amounts.
NEWS
By Robert Rector | July 20, 1995
IN THE battle over welfare reform, the blame game already has started. The White House stands ready to point the accusing finger at Congress, if lawmakers dare to take the tough steps that are needed, while Congress cowers in fear at the thought of being blamed for "lacking compassion."But hope springs eternal. Just in case Washington decides it wants to forget politics, here are a few of the steps it can take to get welfare spending under control and break the cycle of dependency:* The growth of total welfare spending must be capped at 3 percent per year.
NEWS
By CAL THOMAS | December 9, 1994
Washington -- A revival of the 1960s musical ''Oliver'' is underway in London, and it may come to America.To listen to some of the political rhetoric of recent days, one would think that the new Republican congressional majority is preparing to revive the worst of the orphanages that are depicted in the musical, which is based on a Charles Dickens novel, as a cure for what ails the increasingly dysfunctional American family.In the Republican ''Contract with America,'' the orphanage is simply one of many options, not requirements, that would be given to states considering which approaches work best to address the problems of illegitimacy, delinquency and other social ills.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | June 16, 1994
IT WOULD be easy "to end welfare as we know it," as President Clinton promised to. It's primarily just a matter of defining our terms."Welfare" is shorthand for the program known as Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC).The first thing I would do if I were president is to write into the U.S. Code a non-cash definition of "Aid." Henceforth, the poor would get a credit card that entitled them to buy all the things that they needed for their "welfare," which would also be defined in the Code:"the state of faring well or doing well: thriving or successful progress in life"Thus one could buy -- or, rather, acquire -- milk, but not beer, for example.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 17, 1995
WASHINGTON -- In a fierce reaction to a measure that would drop hundreds of thousands of people from federal welfare rolls, House Democrats yesterday dismissed Republican welfare reform proposals as something out of "fiscal fantasy land.""Beneath all the tough talk, the Republican proposal does absolutely nothing to reform welfare," said House Minority Leader Richard A. Gephardt of Missouri, at a Capitol Hill news conference.As for the GOP proposal to roll some 50 welfare programs -- including the main one, Aid to Families with Dependent Children -- into block grants to the states, Mr. Gephardt said: "The Republicans just want to change the logos on the checks, cross their fingers and hope the problem goes away."
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 17, 1995
WASHINGTON -- In a fierce reaction to a measure that would drop hundreds of thousands of people from federal welfare rolls, House Democrats yesterday dismissed Republican welfare reform proposals as something out of "fiscal fantasy land.""Beneath all the tough talk, the Republican proposal does absolutely nothing to reform welfare," said House Minority Leader Richard A. Gephardt of Missouri, at a Capitol Hill news conference.As for the GOP proposal to roll some 50 welfare programs -- including the main one, Aid to Families with Dependent Children -- into block grants to the states, Mr. Gephardt said: "The Republicans just want to change the logos on the checks, cross their fingers and hope the problem goes away."
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | January 1, 1995
In 1958, Maurice Sendak, who would become a legendary writer and illustrator of children's books, teamed with Sesyle Joslin to create a charming guide to social behavior for children called "What Do You Say, Dear?"Soon to be followed by "What Do You Do, Dear?" these books described awkward situations right out of a child's imagination and then suggested a polite response.TCFor instance: "You are picking dandelions and columbines outside the castle. Suddenly a fierce dragon appears and blows red smoke at you, but just then a brave knight gallops up and cuts off the dragon's head.
NEWS
By CAL THOMAS | December 9, 1994
Washington -- A revival of the 1960s musical ''Oliver'' is underway in London, and it may come to America.To listen to some of the political rhetoric of recent days, one would think that the new Republican congressional majority is preparing to revive the worst of the orphanages that are depicted in the musical, which is based on a Charles Dickens novel, as a cure for what ails the increasingly dysfunctional American family.In the Republican ''Contract with America,'' the orphanage is simply one of many options, not requirements, that would be given to states considering which approaches work best to address the problems of illegitimacy, delinquency and other social ills.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,SUN STAFF GRAPHICWashington Bureau of The Sun | December 1, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The Social Security Administration acknowledged yesterday that it is sending as much as $60,000 a year in tax-free disability benefits into some households across the country, nearly double the nation's median household income.The Woodlawn agency also said 8.5 percent of the 6 million people collecting benefits live in households that receive at least two checks, an increase of 30 percent in the last 9 years.This was the second agency study this year of its troubled disability program, known as Supplemental Security Income.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | June 16, 1994
IT WOULD be easy "to end welfare as we know it," as President Clinton promised to. It's primarily just a matter of defining our terms."Welfare" is shorthand for the program known as Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC).The first thing I would do if I were president is to write into the U.S. Code a non-cash definition of "Aid." Henceforth, the poor would get a credit card that entitled them to buy all the things that they needed for their "welfare," which would also be defined in the Code:"the state of faring well or doing well: thriving or successful progress in life"Thus one could buy -- or, rather, acquire -- milk, but not beer, for example.
NEWS
May 23, 1994
A LETTER from a long-time reader provides some historical perspective on the current debate about welfare reform. He writes as follows:"I was a social worker in a county welfare department in the late 1930s when the ADC [Aid to Dependent Children] program, as it was then identified, saw the light of day. Why ADC? Simply because assistance was provided exclusively for children: $18 for the first child, $12 for each additional, on the basis of eligibility of course. Supplemental payments came from the locally financed General Public Assistance program -- in very limited amounts.
NEWS
By ALEX JONES | August 15, 1993
President Clinton has promised an end to "welfare as we know it." But what does the average person really know about welfare? Many believe they know a lot, based on what they have heard about "somebody's situation."The truth is most people know very little. For instance, some people think of unemployment benefits as welfare, even though it is an insurance program with the premiums paid by the employer. Others consider food stamps as welfare, even though the program was designed to stimulate sales of U.S. farm products and is funded by the Department of Agriculture.
NEWS
By Robert Rector | June 15, 1992
THE PUBLIC'S current fixation on how to help America's poor since the Los Angeles riots is long overdue.Today's welfare policy is hopelessly misguided because it focuses almost exclusively on raising the living standards of the poor -- defined for a family of four in 1991 as having an income of $12,675 -- while ignoring the breakdown in values that lead to the formation of healthy families, stable individuals and self-sufficiency.There has been no shortage of federal spending on welfare: Total federal, state, and local welfare spending now tops $220 billion -- about $6,500 for every poor person in America.
NEWS
By ALEX JONES | August 15, 1993
President Clinton has promised an end to "welfare as we know it." But what does the average person really know about welfare? Many believe they know a lot, based on what they have heard about "somebody's situation."The truth is most people know very little. For instance, some people think of unemployment benefits as welfare, even though it is an insurance program with the premiums paid by the employer. Others consider food stamps as welfare, even though the program was designed to stimulate sales of U.S. farm products and is funded by the Department of Agriculture.
NEWS
By Robert Rector | June 15, 1992
THE PUBLIC'S current fixation on how to help America's poor since the Los Angeles riots is long overdue.Today's welfare policy is hopelessly misguided because it focuses almost exclusively on raising the living standards of the poor -- defined for a family of four in 1991 as having an income of $12,675 -- while ignoring the breakdown in values that lead to the formation of healthy families, stable individuals and self-sufficiency.There has been no shortage of federal spending on welfare: Total federal, state, and local welfare spending now tops $220 billion -- about $6,500 for every poor person in America.
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