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By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | September 10, 1993
Remember when synthesizers were so new that they were treated virtually as a kind of novelty instrument? Back then, synth rock was just blip-and-bleep music, an almost laughable attempt at pop futurism that even at its best sounded vaguely robotic. At the time,it seemed unlikely that anyone would ever consider the synthesizer a rock and roll instrumentNow.of course,synths are almost as common as guitars, and have largely replaced pianos and organs on stage and in the studio. But as Depeche Mode songwriter Martin Gore sees it, the ubiquity of synthesizers hasn't done much to change the way pop listeners look at synth bands.
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By GLENN GAMBOA and GLENN GAMBOA,NEWSDAY | May 18, 2006
No matter how much singer David Gahan likes to take off his shirt, Depeche Mode, known for its black celebrations, blasphemous rumors and personal Jesuses, is not exactly a band meant for the outdoors. Martin Gore, the band's other singer and chief songwriter and multi-instrumentalist, agrees. "Generally, I do prefer being indoors," he said, calling from a tour stop in San Francisco. "It captures the sound better. It feels better, works better with things. It's a bit of a different vibe just being outdoors, especially for us. But it's summer and it's nice to get out."
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By J. Doug Gill and J. Doug Gill,Contributing Writer | September 13, 1993
As the last full year of media hype has reminded us, the "new" Depeche Mode is as warm and fuzzy as an A.A. Milne character. Quite a feat, when you consider the Mode made their reputation on icebergs of Arctic-cold synthesizers.So, in spite of the user-friendly nature of the band's latest album, "Songs of Faith and Devotion," I approached the USAir Arena (formerly the Capital Centre) with more than just a hint of skepticism.Could these pioneers of keyboard squawks and honks successfully transfer their electronic vision to a low-tech environment?
ENTERTAINMENT
By TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | March 16, 2006
Some news tidbits from the video game front: Love 'em or hate 'em, Depeche Mode have signed on to redo their tune "Suffer Well" in Simlish, that garbled nonsense language familiar to any Sims fan, for Open for Business, the third expansion pack for The Sims 2. Eighties hit-makers Howard Jones ("Things Can Only Get Better") and Kajagoogoo ("Too Shy") also get converted to Simlish. The "language" is actually based on fractured Ukrainian and Tagalog, the language of the Philippines. Midway Games and Vin Diesel's Tigon Studios are teaming up to bring a film version of the hit game Wheelman to the big screen.
ENTERTAINMENT
By TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | March 16, 2006
Some news tidbits from the video game front: Love 'em or hate 'em, Depeche Mode have signed on to redo their tune "Suffer Well" in Simlish, that garbled nonsense language familiar to any Sims fan, for Open for Business, the third expansion pack for The Sims 2. Eighties hit-makers Howard Jones ("Things Can Only Get Better") and Kajagoogoo ("Too Shy") also get converted to Simlish. The "language" is actually based on fractured Ukrainian and Tagalog, the language of the Philippines. Midway Games and Vin Diesel's Tigon Studios are teaming up to bring a film version of the hit game Wheelman to the big screen.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | March 23, 1993
It's amazing how long some cliches seem to linger. Even though more than a decade has passed since all-synth bands like Depeche Mode proved that rock could be made without guitars or drums, there are still those who equate synthesizers with soulless, empty pop music.Never mind that synths can be heard everywhere these days, from jazz bands to jeans commercials; the perception holds. As far as some pop fans are concerned, synth bands are cold and robotic, while guitar bands are the epitome of warmth and humanity.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2005
The '80s electronic popsters Depeche Mode are back with a new album -- Playing the Angel -- and the band has hit the road to promote it. Tomorrow night at 8, they're at the Patriot Center, George Mason University, Fairfax, Va. Tickets are $49.50-$75. To purchase, call 410-547-SEAT or 703-993-3000 or go to ticketmaster.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
By GLENN GAMBOA and GLENN GAMBOA,NEWSDAY | May 18, 2006
No matter how much singer David Gahan likes to take off his shirt, Depeche Mode, known for its black celebrations, blasphemous rumors and personal Jesuses, is not exactly a band meant for the outdoors. Martin Gore, the band's other singer and chief songwriter and multi-instrumentalist, agrees. "Generally, I do prefer being indoors," he said, calling from a tour stop in San Francisco. "It captures the sound better. It feels better, works better with things. It's a bit of a different vibe just being outdoors, especially for us. But it's summer and it's nice to get out."
ENTERTAINMENT
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 8, 2005
Talib Kweli Right About Now: The Official Sucka Free CD [Koch Records] * * (2 stars) Brooklyn-born MC Talib Kweli is a hip-hop rarity: a conscious rapper who enjoys commercial success and significant, unquestioned underground credibility. That's one of the reasons hip-hop fans from the 'hood to the 'burbs and everywhere in between have been eagerly anticipating his latest release. The former member of Black Star has made a name for himself by rapping in compelling, realistic and human terms about topics all but played out by mainstream rappers: poverty, violence, individual struggle.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | December 10, 1993
THE SIGNAce of Base (Arista 18740) Vocally, Ace of Base comes on as a sort of latter-day ABBA, with two pert-voiced women handling the lead work while the two guys stay in the background. Where this Swedish foursome parts company with its predecessor is in its devotion to the beat, as every melody on "The Sign" is grounded in some form of dance music, be it the lithe, reggae-inflected pulse of "All That She Wants" or the techno-tinged groove of "Young and Proud." And even though the songs tend to be a touch on the frothy side, the blend of melody and rhythm in songs like "All That She Wants" or "Happy Nation" is all but irresistible.
ENTERTAINMENT
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 8, 2005
Talib Kweli Right About Now: The Official Sucka Free CD [Koch Records] * * (2 stars) Brooklyn-born MC Talib Kweli is a hip-hop rarity: a conscious rapper who enjoys commercial success and significant, unquestioned underground credibility. That's one of the reasons hip-hop fans from the 'hood to the 'burbs and everywhere in between have been eagerly anticipating his latest release. The former member of Black Star has made a name for himself by rapping in compelling, realistic and human terms about topics all but played out by mainstream rappers: poverty, violence, individual struggle.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2005
The '80s electronic popsters Depeche Mode are back with a new album -- Playing the Angel -- and the band has hit the road to promote it. Tomorrow night at 8, they're at the Patriot Center, George Mason University, Fairfax, Va. Tickets are $49.50-$75. To purchase, call 410-547-SEAT or 703-993-3000 or go to ticketmaster.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jonathan Pitts and By Jonathan Pitts,Sun Staff | December 16, 2001
On a hillside slash of verdant green 30 minutes west of Washington, two modest gray barns adjoin in silence. It's peaceful here. This might be a good place to stable horses, keep a few head of cattle. Step inside, though, and you get it right away. The burnished golden timbers - the flooring, the walls, the rafters, the 352-seat theater - say, "Hush and listen; go back in time." The Barns of Wolf Trap, now 200 years old, were moved 20 years ago from their home in upstate New York to Vienna, Va., and reconstructed using 18th-century techniques.
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By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 19, 2001
With Strange Little Girls, Tori Amos' cover-girl power takes center stage as she seizes classics and not-so-classics and makes them uniquely, strangely her own. The album of remakes, some relatively faithful, others just plain weird, will be a slight disappointment to rabid fans hungering for new Tori tunes since 1999's To Venus and Back. But she infuses the covers, from artists as diverse as Lou Reed and Depeche Mode, with spiritual, typically Tori attitude that not only brings out previously undiscovered elements of the original songs, but also shows her respect for her inspirations and influences on a scale that makes you want to go out and sing karaoke with her. Amos has always been a master of diverse covers, though her most impressive, including the Rolling Stones' "Angie," Fleetwood Mac's "Landslide" and Nirvana's "Smells Like Teen Spirit," are normally relegated to single B-sides, hard-to-find bootleg albums or concert performances.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | November 5, 1998
98," but don't take that to mean the band itself is interested only in the same old same-old.98," call Sundial at 410-783-1800 and enter the code 6197. For other local numbers, see the directory on Page 2B.Pub Date: 11/05/98
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | April 15, 1997
With gossip being one of the entertainment industry's most popular byproducts, it's hard to separate what a singer does on record from what he or she does in real life. These days, most everyone assumes that singers write what they know -- literally.So when Depeche Mode fans sit down with "Ultra" (Warner Bros. 46522, arriving in stores today), the band's first studio album in four years, many will wonder how much of the album has to do with singer David Gahan's drug problems. Gahan, remember, went into cardiac arrest last spring after overdosing on heroin and cocaine, a brush with death that nearly broke up the band.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | April 15, 1997
With gossip being one of the entertainment industry's most popular byproducts, it's hard to separate what a singer does on record from what he or she does in real life. These days, most everyone assumes that singers write what they know -- literally.So when Depeche Mode fans sit down with "Ultra" (Warner Bros. 46522, arriving in stores today), the band's first studio album in four years, many will wonder how much of the album has to do with singer David Gahan's drug problems. Gahan, remember, went into cardiac arrest last spring after overdosing on heroin and cocaine, a brush with death that nearly broke up the band.
FEATURES
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 19, 2001
With Strange Little Girls, Tori Amos' cover-girl power takes center stage as she seizes classics and not-so-classics and makes them uniquely, strangely her own. The album of remakes, some relatively faithful, others just plain weird, will be a slight disappointment to rabid fans hungering for new Tori tunes since 1999's To Venus and Back. But she infuses the covers, from artists as diverse as Lou Reed and Depeche Mode, with spiritual, typically Tori attitude that not only brings out previously undiscovered elements of the original songs, but also shows her respect for her inspirations and influences on a scale that makes you want to go out and sing karaoke with her. Amos has always been a master of diverse covers, though her most impressive, including the Rolling Stones' "Angie," Fleetwood Mac's "Landslide" and Nirvana's "Smells Like Teen Spirit," are normally relegated to single B-sides, hard-to-find bootleg albums or concert performances.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | December 10, 1993
THE SIGNAce of Base (Arista 18740) Vocally, Ace of Base comes on as a sort of latter-day ABBA, with two pert-voiced women handling the lead work while the two guys stay in the background. Where this Swedish foursome parts company with its predecessor is in its devotion to the beat, as every melody on "The Sign" is grounded in some form of dance music, be it the lithe, reggae-inflected pulse of "All That She Wants" or the techno-tinged groove of "Young and Proud." And even though the songs tend to be a touch on the frothy side, the blend of melody and rhythm in songs like "All That She Wants" or "Happy Nation" is all but irresistible.
FEATURES
By J. Doug Gill and J. Doug Gill,Contributing Writer | September 13, 1993
As the last full year of media hype has reminded us, the "new" Depeche Mode is as warm and fuzzy as an A.A. Milne character. Quite a feat, when you consider the Mode made their reputation on icebergs of Arctic-cold synthesizers.So, in spite of the user-friendly nature of the band's latest album, "Songs of Faith and Devotion," I approached the USAir Arena (formerly the Capital Centre) with more than just a hint of skepticism.Could these pioneers of keyboard squawks and honks successfully transfer their electronic vision to a low-tech environment?
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