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October 30, 2010
HAGERSTOWN — The state Department of Natural Resources says Maryland's bear hunt is closed. Sixty-seven bears were killed as of 9 p.m. on Friday and the hunt was closed. The season began on Monday. The hunt was limited to Allegany and Garrett counties.
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SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2013
Maryland's annual black bear hunt went into overtime Saturday, and some might look at the outcome as a moral victory for the hairy, soon-to-be hibernating creatures. For the first time since the hunt was revived in 2004 after a 51-year hiatus, hunters who spent part of the past six days in Garrett and Allegany counties failed to meet the quota set by the state Department of Natural Resources' Heritage and Wildlife Service. According to Harry Spiker, the state's bear biologist, 94 bears were killed as of Saturday night - one shy of a quota that had been raised from last year with hopes of taking between 95 and 130. A year ago, 92 bears were killed with the quota between 80 and 110. But Spiker considered the event a success, particularly for the fact that there was a "major increase" in the number of bears taken in Allegany County.
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SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2013
Since 1998, the Maryland Department of Natural Resources has taught more than 32,000 students in 1,200 classroom programs about the Chesapeake Bay, coastal and bay marine life, as well as the state's streams through its Teaching Environmental Awareness in Maryland (TEAM) program. DNR officials are looking for volunteers who want to learn about the program and then teach it to children in third through eighth grades in the state. Volunteers must be 18 years old and be able to provide their own transportation.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2013
William Jabine II, a former Evening Sun reporter and assistant city editor who later became spokesman for the old State Roads Commission and the Department of Natural Resources, died Wednesday of pneumonia at Catonsville Commons Nursing and Rehabilitation Center. The longtime Annapolis resident was 90. "Bill was a meticulous newsman. He was always checking up on reported facts to make certain they were accurate before he put them in a story," said Helen Delich Bentley, a former newsroom colleague who later became a congresswoman and federal maritime administrator.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2011
Joe Williams kneels on the deck and begins gingerly picking through Patuxent River muck, looking for signs of life. A wiggling here, a scuttling there brings a slight smile to his face. The census of blue crabs hibernating in the muddy bottom of the Chesapeake Bay will help state fisheries scientists determine what kind of recreational and commercial crabbing season Maryland is likely to have. If it's like last year, when the number of blue crabs skyrocketed 60 percent to their highest level since 1997, summer will seem a little sweeter.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2013
A 546-acre deer hunting area that opened in Anne Arundel County shortly after Thanksgiving and will close at the end of January has seen only seven deer taken so far, according to the deer project leader for the Maryland Department of Natural Resources. But the small number of deer killed by hunters at the Crownsville Cooperative Wildlife Management Area doesn't surprise Brian Eyler. "It normally takes a year or two for new areas to catch on," Eyler said. The hunting area in Crownsville opened Nov. 26, two days after the start of the deer firearm season, and will close when the bowhunting season ends Jan. 31. Deer hunting only is permitted there, and the program will follow the guidelines for bag limits in the 2012-2013 Guide to Hunting and Trapping in Maryland.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2013
Maryland's annual black bear hunt went into overtime Saturday, and some might look at the outcome as a moral victory for the hairy, soon-to-be hibernating creatures. For the first time since the hunt was revived in 2004 after a 51-year hiatus, hunters who spent part of the past six days in Garrett and Allegany counties failed to meet the quota set by the state Department of Natural Resources' Heritage and Wildlife Service. According to Harry Spiker, the state's bear biologist, 94 bears were killed as of Saturday night - one shy of a quota that had been raised from last year with hopes of taking between 95 and 130. A year ago, 92 bears were killed with the quota between 80 and 110. But Spiker considered the event a success, particularly for the fact that there was a "major increase" in the number of bears taken in Allegany County.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2013
William Jabine II, a former Evening Sun reporter and assistant city editor who later became spokesman for the old State Roads Commission and the Department of Natural Resources, died Wednesday of pneumonia at Catonsville Commons Nursing and Rehabilitation Center. The longtime Annapolis resident was 90. "Bill was a meticulous newsman. He was always checking up on reported facts to make certain they were accurate before he put them in a story," said Helen Delich Bentley, a former newsroom colleague who later became a congresswoman and federal maritime administrator.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | January 16, 1999
ROCKVILLE -- Mess with Ruth Hanessian's frogs, mess with Ruth Hanessian.The state Natural Resources Police went undercover last year and ticketed the Rockville pet shop owner for allegedly selling native frogs without a $25 permit.The state says the frogs are as Maryland as William Donald Schaefer.Hanessian says that unless her supplier snatched the tree frogs from a swamp here, smuggled them to Shanghai, China, then brought them to Maryland and charged her $2 apiece, the DNR is all wet.Actually, she uses much stronger language.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | May 26, 1999
Water chestnuts, not the ones you get at a Chinese restaurant, but noxious plants with spiked seed pods that can cut through a flip-flop, have reappeared in Chesapeake Bay tributaries, threatening to choke off the waterways.The plants, believed to have been introduced to the United States from Eurasia in the late 1800s and first seen in the Potomac River in the 1920s, have nearly covered Owens Creek off the Bird River in Baltimore County and Lloyds Creek off the Sassafras River on the Eastern Shore, according to John Surrick, spokesman for the state Department of Natural Resources.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2013
Since 1998, the Maryland Department of Natural Resources has taught more than 32,000 students in 1,200 classroom programs about the Chesapeake Bay, coastal and bay marine life, as well as the state's streams through its Teaching Environmental Awareness in Maryland (TEAM) program. DNR officials are looking for volunteers who want to learn about the program and then teach it to children in third through eighth grades in the state. Volunteers must be 18 years old and be able to provide their own transportation.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2013
A 546-acre deer hunting area that opened in Anne Arundel County shortly after Thanksgiving and will close at the end of January has seen only seven deer taken so far, according to the deer project leader for the Maryland Department of Natural Resources. But the small number of deer killed by hunters at the Crownsville Cooperative Wildlife Management Area doesn't surprise Brian Eyler. "It normally takes a year or two for new areas to catch on," Eyler said. The hunting area in Crownsville opened Nov. 26, two days after the start of the deer firearm season, and will close when the bowhunting season ends Jan. 31. Deer hunting only is permitted there, and the program will follow the guidelines for bag limits in the 2012-2013 Guide to Hunting and Trapping in Maryland.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 25, 2011
Albert Laurence "Larry" Bartlett II, a retired salesman who with his wife restored the historic Gittings-Baldwin House in Baltimore County, died Tuesday of heart failure at Genesis Cromwell Center in Parkville. The Baldwin resident was 85. The son of a dentist and a homemaker, Mr. Bartlett was born in Pittsburgh and raised in Clarksburg, W.Va., Shepherdstown, W.Va., and Columbus, Ga., where he graduated in 1944 from high school. He served in the Army Air Forces during the waning days of World War II and remained a reservist for the next two decades, attaining the rank of captain.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2011
Joe Williams kneels on the deck and begins gingerly picking through Patuxent River muck, looking for signs of life. A wiggling here, a scuttling there brings a slight smile to his face. The census of blue crabs hibernating in the muddy bottom of the Chesapeake Bay will help state fisheries scientists determine what kind of recreational and commercial crabbing season Maryland is likely to have. If it's like last year, when the number of blue crabs skyrocketed 60 percent to their highest level since 1997, summer will seem a little sweeter.
NEWS
October 30, 2010
HAGERSTOWN — The state Department of Natural Resources says Maryland's bear hunt is closed. Sixty-seven bears were killed as of 9 p.m. on Friday and the hunt was closed. The season began on Monday. The hunt was limited to Allegany and Garrett counties.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2003
Leaning over the edge of a motorboat on the Severn River yesterday, the four fisheries biologists grappled with the weight of their catch -- hundreds of shining perch squirming in a large, black net. Then, instead of rejoicing in the harvest, the men knelt silently by the flopping fish and began releasing them, dropping some over the boat's edge and throwing others over their shoulders into the water. The final count for the harvest: 64 yellow perch, 360 white perch and a smattering of catfish and pumpkinseed sunfish.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | September 14, 2001
THE EXPOSED picture hooks made the bare walls of Sarah Taylor-Rogers' spacious, top-floor office look even starker. Her personal stuff had all been carted out a few days earlier, after one of Gov. Parris N. Glendening's staff told her, without warning or explanation, that she was finished after two years as secretary of the Department of Natural Resources. Wearing one of her jaunty, trademark hats - a broad-brimmed straw number trimmed with a broad, black ribbon - Taylor-Rogers sat at a mostly empty desk, accepting calls of condolence and support; she was also checking on suddenly important details like her retirement status in the state system.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1999
ABOARD THE MISS KAY -- In a steady rain, crew members sort through the pile of oysters on a washboard, separating "markets" and "smalls," "spat" and "boxes" and recording their findings as part of the state Department of Natural Resources fall survey.They started three weeks ago near Poole's Island, about 18 miles north of the Bay Bridge, and have been working their way south dredging on the Eastern and Western shores to get a picture of the oyster population.So far, they have found fewer boxes -- the empty shells of oysters killed by Dermo or MSX -- than they had feared.
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