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By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | March 22, 2003
Roger Langsdale, a retired federal government worker who spent the last several months living aboard his 44-foot ketch Star Baby at Annapolis' City Dock, died Thursday on his boat of colon cancer. He was 57. Mr. Langsdale, a Pittsburgh native, and his wife, Nancy, came to Annapolis for the U.S. Sailboat Show in October. Here, Mr. Langsdale learned that he had advanced cancer and became too sick to leave. As word spread of his condition, local residents, city employees and fellow boaters began to visit and extend help to the couple.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
Maryland received a roughly $400,000 bonus Monday for its crackdown on businesses that misclassify workers, part of more than $2 million the state won in federal grants. It is the first time the U.S. Department of Labor has focused funding on efforts to combat worker misclassification. The bonus is a portion of nearly $100 million in grants the U.S. Department of Labor announced Monday. About $1.14 million of the funding is to help Maryland adopt new technologies in unemployment insurance programs.
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BUSINESS
By Carrie Mason-Draffen | August 1, 2004
I work for a large bank that pays us "half time" when we work more than 40 hours in a week. But I thought the law required them to pay time and a half. Although it feels as if you've been cheated, the difference may simply be semantic. Let's say you make $9 an hour and are entitled to overtime pay when you work more than 40 hours in a week. Federal law says the overtime rate must at least be 1 1/2 times your regular rate, or $13.50 in this case. In other words, it's your regular rate, which is $9, plus the half-time premium, or $4.50.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2013
Loretta Dumas-Turner, a retired U.S. Department of Labor economist and world traveler, died April 18 from complications of diabetes at Baltimore Washington Medical Center. The longtime Pasadena resident was 57. The daughter of a factory worker and homemaker, the former Loretta Marie Dumas was born and raised in Macon, Ga., where she graduated from public schools. Mrs. Dumas-Turner was a 1977 summa cum laude graduate of Fisk University in Nashville, Tenn., where she earned a bachelor's degree in political science and was a member of Phi Beta Kappa.
BUSINESS
February 3, 1999
The names of candidates who passed the most recent Maryland Certified Public Accountants Examination are now available through SunFax.To use this service you must have access to a fax machine. To retrieve the list, call 410-332-6123 and enter code 5800 when the automated attendant answers.The results are also available on the Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation Web site. Point your Web browser to http: //www.dllr.state.md.us/.Pub Date: 2/03/99
NEWS
By From Staff Reports | August 4, 1995
Eight people -- most of them male retail clerks, taxi drivers and supervisors -- died by violence while on the job in the Baltimore area last year, the U.S. Department of Labor reported yesterday.The area, which includes the city and six surrounding counties, tallied one fewer violent on-the-job death in 1994 than the previous year, and had a lower violent death rate than cities such as Washington, where more than three-fourths of workplace deaths were caused by violence, said Alan Paisner, spokesman for the department's Bureau of Labor Statistics.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | October 15, 1993
&TC Carroll County's School to Work program will be presented as a model for the state during the "Maryland's Workforce Strategies for the '90s" conference in Baltimore next week.Diane Massey, head of the county Job Training Partnership Administration, has been invited to speak about the Carroll County program, which guides "at-risk" students through high school and into employment.Ms. Massey, along with Katherine Myers and Gayla Martin of the JTPA office, will also offer what local officials have learned during the four years the School to Work program has been used in Carroll County.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | August 13, 1991
SHATTERING the "glass ceiling" in corporate America should be even more of a national priority now that an authoritative Bush administration study has shown that women and minorities face barriers in their careers at a far earlier stage than previously believed.The Department of Labor study disclosed that women and minorities are blocked by subtle corporate practices at much lower management levels than heretofore thought. And the careers of minorities were found to plateau much earlier than those of white women, according to Secretary of Labor Lynn Martin.
NEWS
December 18, 1990
Business and labor leaders in Maryland are being urged to allow their employees to volunteer for the U.S. Department of Labor workforce quality program.The program matches volunteer role models, or mentors, with disadvantaged or at-risk youths. The goal is to motivate the youths to stay in school and acquire basic skills needed to survive in a competitive workplace.In the Baltimore area, information on youth mentoring programs is available fom Kalman Hettleman of the Baltimore Mentoring Institute, at 301-685-8316.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | August 26, 2000
A worker who leaves his job voluntarily for another one is not entitled to unemployment compensation from his former employer if the new job doesn't work out, the Maryland Court of Appeals ruled yesterday. The 4-3 ruling could have wide implications for workers across the state as they seek better jobs and pay. The decision reversed rulings by Montgomery County Circuit Court and the Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation, which administers the compensation law. The case involves Gary C. Miller, a manager for one year at Total Audio-Visual Systems Inc., who joined a competitor that offered an $8,000-a-year pay raise and a higher percentage of profits.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2012
Hundreds of workers laid off from the Sparrows Point steel mill will receive job retraining and other services under a $3 million U.S. Department of Labor grant announced Monday. The funding will expand job-related services under the National Emergency Grant program to 885 workers affected by the closure. Mill owner RG Steel LLC, which filed for bankruptcy protection in May, is in the midst of laying off nearly 2,000 workers, almost all of its workforce at Sparrows Point. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, who had pushed for the grant along with Sen. Ben Cardin, called the funding "a critical lifeline" for the workers.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2010
If you don't know how much you are paying for your 401(k), you're in the company of millions. "The average participant has no idea what they are paying," says Rick Meigs, president of 401khelpcenter.com. Even employers, he says, don't quite know. But that's about to change. Last week, the Department of Labor announced new regulations on fee disclosures that will affect about 72 million workers in 401(k)s. The goal is to provide enough information about fees and investments in an easy-to-understand format so workers can make better decisions.
BUSINESS
By Michael Oneal and Michael Oneal,Tribune Newspapers | August 8, 2009
Losses in the job market are finally showing real signs of moderating. But as with most other economic data these days, Friday's employment report sent mixed messages, suggesting that while the economy may be bottoming out, recovery will likely be slow, fitful and frustrating. The Department of Labor reported that the U.S. economy lost 247,000 jobs in July while the unemployment rate dipped to 9.4 percent from 9.5 percent. That was the smallest monthly decline in jobs since last August and provided clear evidence that the longer-term pace of job erosion is slowing markedly.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman | March 14, 2009
Maryland's Labor Secretary Thomas E. Perez has been tapped to run the Civil Rights Division of the U.S. Department of Justice, President Barack Obama announced yesterday. Perez's move, which had been widely rumored for weeks, means he will rejoin an agency where he worked as a federal prosecutor in the 1990s. As head of Maryland's Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation, Perez helped to craft the state's response to the foreclosure crisis. His political career in Maryland also included a stint as the first Latino elected to the Montgomery County Council and a campaign for state attorney general that he abandoned after being disqualified for lacking the required legal experience in the state.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | November 14, 2008
A memorial service for Nancy Erwin, a former Maryland Department of Labor official who had worked in consumer affairs in the Jimmy Carter administration, will be held at 11 a.m. Nov. 22 at the Episcopal Church of the Redeemer, 5603 N. Charles St., where she was a member. The Tuscany-Canterbury resident died Nov. 2 of complications from cancer at Johns Hopkins Hospital. She was 62. Born Nancy Smick in Cleveland, she earned an English literature degree at Purdue University and a master's degree in consumer economics at the University of Maryland, College Park.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA and LAURA VOZZELLA,laura.vozzella@baltsun.com | November 9, 2008
M ichael Phelps, you've won another medal. Created by acclaimed Austrian artist Franz West, it's in a vault at the Baltimore Museum of Art. That's the good news. The bad: It's a turquoise Plasticine disc the size of a salad plate, with lumpy, pink, vaguely hemorrhoidal blobs on both sides. Which isn't to say the piece doesn't rank up there with other works by West, whose first American retrospective is on display at the BMA. West is all about blobs and body parts and bubble-gum pink, and for some reason, people who know a whole lot about art seem to like that.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 3, 1991
The workplace is changing so drastically that schools should expand the three R's to include teamwork, leadership, communication and a range of other skills prized by the global economy, or millions of young people face a dismal future, a U.S. Department of Labor commission report says."
NEWS
October 21, 1990
The Salvation Army, appropriately enough, has been given a reprieve that will permit it to go about its good works through the Christmas season without fear of being put in the dock by the Department of Labor. All of which proves the bureaucratic mind can be made to see reason, provided sufficient political pressure is applied.What has enflamed federal functionaries is a "three hots and a cot" program for drug and alcohol abusers who have long turned to the Salvation Army not for a job but for help.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,gadi.dechter@baltsun.com | September 17, 2008
Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown announced yesterday about $600,000 in federal funds for projects designed to ease the impact of the military base realignment process known as BRAC. Funding includes $94,000 for a new construction technology center at Baltimore City Community College; $100,000 for Towson University to bring an "elementary engineering" program to Harford County public schools; and $100,000 for Monster Government Solutions to create a Web site for Maryland military families. The funds are part of a $4 million BRAC-related grant to Maryland's labor department from the U.S. Department of Labor.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown | September 21, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The Pentagon has given the state another $4 million to help plan for the arrival of new residents coming with the expansion of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Fort Meade, the National Naval Medical Center and other military facilities in the state. "[The Base Realignment and Closure process] will bring tremendous benefits to Maryland, but only with significant planning and new development," Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski said yesterday in a statement. "This funding will lay the groundwork essential to the implementation of the BRAC recommendations."
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